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Comparative analysis of suicidality in two Bulgarian regions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

K. Stoychev
Affiliation:
Medical University, Psychiatry, Pleven, Bulgaria
V. Nakov
Affiliation:
National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Mental Health, Sofia, Bulgaria
D. Dekov
Affiliation:
Medical University, Forensic Medicine, Pleven, Bulgaria
M. Baltov
Affiliation:
Medical University, Forensic Medicine, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
R. Dinolova-Hodzhadzhikova
Affiliation:
National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Mental Health, Sofia, Bulgaria
K. Ivanov
Affiliation:
University Hospital “Dr G. Stranski”, Psychiatry, Pleven, Bulgaria
M. Stoimenova
Affiliation:
Medical University, Psychiatry, Pleven, Bulgaria
P. Chumpalova
Affiliation:
Medical University, Psychiatry, Pleven, Bulgaria

Abstract

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Introduction

Suicidality is still an understudied problem in Bulgaria especially on a subnational (regional) level.

Objectives

To collect data on suicidality in two major regions of Bulgaria with a population over 250,000 each (Plovdiv and Pleven) for a six years period (2009–2015).

Aims

To analyze demographic, health-related and other characteristics associated with suicidal behavior as well as motives and methods of suicide.

Methods

Data were extracted from relevant documentation (medical records, public health reports, etc.) and statistically processed upon collection.

Results

Majority of suicide victims were males between 45 and 64 years while most suicide attempts occurred among 18–29 years old females.

Leading method of suicide was hanging, followed by jumping from high places and use of firearm.

Prevailing suicidal motives were psychotic symptoms, serious somatic illnesses and family problems. Depression accounted for 25% of all suicide cases and in another 25% motivation could not be identified because of insufficient data.

The proportion of unemployed among suicide committers was not significantly higher than that of employed and retired.

Conclusions

Severe mental disorders are a major trigger of suicidal behavior.

Personal relationships should be targeted by suicide prevention interventions.

Somatic illnesses are increasingly important suicide risk factor driven by the ongoing process of population aging.

Frontline healthcare professionals should be trained to explore underlying suicidal motives and actively probe for depression in each case of suicidal behavior.

Unemployment related suicide risk is most likely mediated through an adaptation crisis mechanism induced by the abrupt change of social status.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-Poster Walk: Suicidology and suicide prevention – Part 2
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
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