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Article contents

Asenapine in Clinical Practice: Responders Vs Non-responders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

A. Rossi
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
M.C. Rizza
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
I. Coppola
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
E. Gambaro
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
E. Gattoni
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
S. Di Marco
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
E. Grossini
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Lab. Physiology and Experimental Surgery, Novara, Italy
C. Gramaglia
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
P. Zeppegno
Affiliation:
Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy

Abstract

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Introduction

Asenapine is a second-generation antipsychotic approved in Europe for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes.

Objective

To describe the clinical features of Asenapine responders and non-responders.

Methods

A naturalistic, observational study is ongoing in patients treated with Asenapine. We have already recruited 37 manic patients with a lifetime diagnosis of Bipolar I (BDI) or Schizoaffective Disorder referring to our Psychiatric Ward. Patients are assessed with the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) at baseline (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 4 weeks (T2) of treatment. According to YMRS scores, patients are classified as responders and non-responders.

Results

The preliminary results highlight a significant improvement of the YMRS score from T0 to T2 in most patients. Asenapine seems particularly effective in patients with less severe manic symptoms, and responders are more likely to have lower baseline YMRS score. No correlation has currently emerged between responder status and diagnosis. Non-responders in our sample are females sharing some clinical features: early onset BDI diagnosis, several previous treatments (antipsychotics, mood stabilizers), initial cognitive impairment confirmed with the Mini Mental State Examination, Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale and neuroimaging.

Conclusions

Elderly manic patients with neurological impairment and/or dementia may have poorer therapeutic outcomes and poorer response to pharmacological treatment, which may prove effective in reducing agitation but not mania ratings. Diagnosis (BDI or schizoaffective disorder) does not seem to have a significant impact on Asenapine efficacy. The further recruitment and assessment of patients is expected to support the results described above.

Type
Article: 1606
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2015
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