Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5cfd469876-d8lm2 Total loading time: 0.199 Render date: 2021-06-25T14:33:13.986Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

AS06-04 - White Matter in Bipolar Disorder: Relevance to Pathophysiology and Treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

T. Kieseppä
Affiliation:
National Institute for Health and Welfare Psychiatric Clinic, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland

Abstract

Introduction

Converging evidence from neuroimaging studies indicates that white matter abnormalities may be involved in bipolar disorder (BP). One most consistent finding, though not universal, has been the increased occurrence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in BP patients. The role of hyperintensities in the pathogenesis, and treatment of mood disorders remains unclear. However, the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has expanded somewhat our understanding of white matter in BP.

Aims

During this presentation I will give the overview of the white matter pathology in BP. In addition, I will introduce the results of our study concerning WMH, affective disorders, and neuropsychological functioning.

Methods

We have studied 13 BPI, 15 BPII, 16 major depressive patients, and 21 controls at baseline, and at 5-year follow-up. Besides clinical interviews, further detailed investigation comprised a neuropsychological test battery and structural brain imaging with DTI. WMH were calculated manually, and DTI will be analyzed using tract based statistical methods.

Results

BPI patient group had increased risk for DWMH contrary to BPII and MDD patients when compared to controls. Increased DWMH grade together with age and BDI score predicted decreased capability of visual attention measured by visual span forward subtest of the WMS-R.

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2012
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

AS06-04 - White Matter in Bipolar Disorder: Relevance to Pathophysiology and Treatment
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

AS06-04 - White Matter in Bipolar Disorder: Relevance to Pathophysiology and Treatment
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

AS06-04 - White Matter in Bipolar Disorder: Relevance to Pathophysiology and Treatment
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *