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Sexual dysfunction and central obesity in patients with first episode psychosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

C. Theleritis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
S. Bonaccorso
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
N. Habib
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
D. Stahl
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, De Crespigny Park, King's College, London, UK
F. Gaughran
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
S. Vitoratou
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, De Crespigny Park, King's College, London, UK
Z. Atakan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
A. Kolliakou
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
P. Gardner Sood
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
P. Dazzan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
T.R. Marques
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
P. McGuire
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
K. Greenwood
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
J. Eberhard
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
J. Breedvelt
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
S. Ferracuti
Affiliation:
University of Rome « La Sapienza », Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy
M. Di Forti
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
R.M. Murray
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
S. Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK
Corresponding
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Abstract

Background

In recent years the association between sexual dysfunction (SD) and obesity in the general population has drawn major attention. Although sexual dysfunction is common in psychosis, its relationship with weight gain and obesity remains unclear.

Aims

To investigate the association between sexual dysfunction and obesity in a cohort of patients with first episode psychosis.

Method

Sexual function was assessed in a cohort of patients with first episode psychosis using the Sexual Function Questionnaire (SFQ). Anthropometric measures, including weight, BMI, waist, waist–hip ratio were investigated. Additionally, leptin and testosterone were investigated in male patients.

Results

A total of 116 patients (61 males and 55 females) were included. Of these 59% of males and 67.3% of females showed sexual dysfunction (SD) according to the SFQ. In males, higher SFQ scores were significantly correlated with higher BMI (Std. β = 0.36, P = 0.01), higher leptin levels (Std. β = 0.34, P = 0.02), higher waist–hip ratio (Std. β = 0.32, P = 0.04) and lower testosterone levels (Std. β = −0.44, P = 0.002). In contrast, in females, SFQ scores were not associated with any of these factors.

Conclusions

While sexual dysfunction is present in both female and male patients with their first episode of psychosis, only in males is sexual dysfunction associated with increased BMI and waist–hip ratio. The association between SD, BMI, low levels of testosterone and high levels of leptin suggest that policies that lead to healthier diets and more active lifestyles can be beneficial at least, to male patients.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017

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Footnotes

1

The first two authors have contributed equally to the manuscript and share the first position.

References

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