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Failure to find association between childhood abuse and cognition in first-episode psychosis patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

L. Sideli
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
H.L. Fisher
Affiliation:
MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
M. Russo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
R.M. Murray
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
S.A. Stilo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
B.D.R. Wiffen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
J.A. O’Connor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
M. Aurora Falcone
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
S.M. Pintore
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
L. Ferraro
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
A. Mule’
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
D. La Barbera
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
C. Morgan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
M. Di Forti
Affiliation:
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
Corresponding
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Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between severe childhood abuse and cognitive functions in first-episode psychosis patients and geographically-matched controls. Reports of any abuse were associated with lower scores in the executive function domain in the control group. However, in contrast with our hypothesis, no relationships were found amongst cases.

Type
Short communication
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS

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