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Intersection Conductance and Canonical Alternating Paths: Methods for General Finite Markov Chains

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

RAVI MONTENEGRO*
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA (e-mail: ravi_montenegro@uml.edu)

Abstract

We extend the conductance and canonical paths methods to the setting of general finite Markov chains, including non-reversible non-lazy walks. The new path method is used to show that a known bound for the mixing time of a lazy walk on a Cayley graph with a symmetric generating set also applies to the non-lazy non-symmetric case, often even when there is no holding probability.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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