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Competence and the Three A's: Autonomy, Authenticity, and Aging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2010

David Checkland
Affiliation:
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Michel Silberfeld
Affiliation:
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Résumé

Les concepts de compétence, d'autonomie et d'authenticité sont examinés. Diverses définitions du terme « autonomie » sont distinguées, et les auteurs prétendent que deux d'entre elles n'englobent aucun concept différent de la compétence mentale (la capacité de prendre des décisions) et de l'authenticité. L'accent est mis sur la distinction des questions de capacité et de compétence, et sur des cas où une intervention salutaire est justifiée.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 1993

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