Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-q7wkk Total loading time: 0.129 Render date: 2022-06-30T05:28:54.607Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Richard Wollheim Painting as an Art. The A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, 1984; Bollingen Series 34.33. Princeton: Princeton University Press 1987. Pp.384.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Francis Sparshott*
Affiliation:
Victoria College, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaM5S 1K7

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Critical Notice
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 For the scientific status of psychoanalysis, see for instance Grünbaum, Adolf, ‘The Role of the Case Study Method in the Foundations of Psychoanalysis,Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1988), 623-58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

2 Danto, Arthur C., The State of the Art (New York: Prentice Hall Press 1987), 122Google Scholar

3 Bell, Clive, Art (London: Chatto and Windus 1914)Google Scholar. Bell does not suggest, as Wollheim seems to, that the appreciation of art requires any large expenditures.

4 Cavell, Stanley, Must We Mean What We Say? (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1969)Google Scholar

5 Krauss, Rosalind, ‘Only Project,New Republic 3845-6 (Sept. 12-19, 1988), 33-8Google Scholar

6 Leroi-Gourhan, André, The Dawn of European Art (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press 1983), 62Google Scholar

7 Wollheim concedes that his interpretations in this passage are speculative. They are indeed remarkable. He argues that Manet ‘used the undifferentiated ground .. .in order to wrap around the central figure the kind of indefinite space into which an internal spectator could vanish to good effect,’ a purpose also served (as we have seen) by the ‘cluttered’ grounds of such pictures as Mademoiselle V. This equivalence between cluttered and undifferentiated ground also holds within nocturnal dreams. Manet is thus ‘mobilizing our memories of what nightly goes on in our heads’ (not in my head, I protest; but then, as we have seen, I am incapacitated in this regard). Wollheim then asks why Manet is ‘concerned’ that we should make this connection between painting and dream. But I cannot see what grounds Wollheim has for supposing that the possibility of any such connection ever entered Manet's head. (Incidentally, should it not be possible for an empirical psychologist to devise an experiment to test this aspect of Freudian theory? If Wollheim is right, there should be observable differences between the ways blank-background paintings are interpreted by breast-fed people and by bottle-fed people.)

8 Sartre, J.-P., L'Imaginaire: Psychologie phenomenologique de l'imagination (Paris: Gallimard 1940)Google Scholar

9 Anscombe, G.E.M., Intention (Oxford: Blackwell 1958)Google Scholar; Goldman, Alvin I., A Theory of Human Action (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall 1970)Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Richard Wollheim Painting as an Art. The A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, 1984; Bollingen Series 34.33. Princeton: Princeton University Press 1987. Pp.384.
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Richard Wollheim Painting as an Art. The A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, 1984; Bollingen Series 34.33. Princeton: Princeton University Press 1987. Pp.384.
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Richard Wollheim Painting as an Art. The A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, 1984; Bollingen Series 34.33. Princeton: Princeton University Press 1987. Pp.384.
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *