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Critical notice of Words and Contents, by Richard Vallée

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2021

Robert J. Stainton*
Affiliation:
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Arthur Sullivan
Affiliation:
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada
*
*Corresponding author. Email: rstainto@uwo.ca

Abstract

Section I gives an overview of the contents of “Words and Contents”, and lays out the plan for this Critical Notice. Section II expounds Vallée’s Perry-inspired Pluri-Propositional semantic framework, and Section III is an in-depth case study, focused on complex demonstratives. In Sections IV-V we develop some criticisms, and in Section VI we suggest a solution to these difficulties, which builds on Vallée’s innovative work.

Type
Critical Notice
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Canadian Journal of Philosophy

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References

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