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Medication Use in Patients Presenting to a Rural and Remote Memory Clinic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2014

Trevor A Steve
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Andrew Kirk*
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Margaret Crossley
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Debra Morgan
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Carl D'Arcy
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Jay Biem
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
Dorothy Forbes
Affiliation:
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
Norma Stewart
Affiliation:
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
*
Royal University Hospital, Dept of Medicine (Neurology), 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 0W8. Canada.
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Abstract

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Type
Peer Reviewed Letter
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2008

References

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