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Expression of NF-κB, MCP-1 and MMP-9 in a Cerebral Aneurysm Rabbit Model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2014

Yan fei Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Mudu People's Hospital of Suzhou, Suzhou
Yongqiang Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Hebei Province Corps of Chinese Armed Police Force, Shijiazhuang city, Hebei
Dawei Dai
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Changzheng Hospital of Shanghai, the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, PR China
Zheng Xu*
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Mudu People's Hospital of Suzhou, Suzhou
*
Department of Neurosurgery, Changzheng Hospital of Shanghai, the Second Military Medical University, No.415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, China. Email: zhengxu9988@126.com
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Abstract

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Objective:

We explored the early expression of NF-κB, MCP-1 and -MMP 9 in a rabbit carotid aneurysm model, and investigated the possible mechanism of aneurysm.

Methods:

twenty four adult new Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups. normal control (group a); rabbits received elastase induction for 1, 2 3 weeks (group b, C and d respectively); hematoxylin-eosin stains were performed for observation. the mrna and protein expression of NF-κB, MCP-1 and MMP-9 were analyzed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods.

Results:

the expression of NF-κB and MCp-1 reached their peaks after induction for one week, then decreased. their expression in week 1 and week 2 had no statistical difference. the expression of MMP-9 increased after induction. We observed the highest expression at week 3. as the induction time increased, the number of smooth muscles reduced. endothelial cells were damaged; the aneurysm wall elastic layer was damaged.

Conclusion:

activation of NF-κB may be one of the initiating factors contributing to the occurrence and development of cerebral aneurysm. MCP-1 induced macrophage adhesion and infiltration in the artery wall of cerebral aneurysms, and contributed to the occurrence and development of brain aneurysm. damage to elastic fibers is one of the key factors for aneurysm formation. increased infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of MMP-9 are the main reasons for elastic fiber damage.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2014

References

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