Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-wg55d Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-13T04:34:05.161Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Brain Resuscitation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2015

Enrique C.G. Ventureyra
Affiliation:
Division of Neurosurgery, Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa Ontario, Canada. 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L1
Leslie P. Ivan
Affiliation:
Division of Neurosurgery, Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa Ontario, Canada. 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L1
Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Extract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

All those related to the medical profession are familiar with the term “resuscitation” which usually means restoration of normal cardio-respira-tory activity in someone who has suffered from the effects of severely impaired functions of these two organs.

The concept of “brain resuscitation” has emerged during the past few years and to the best of our knowledge the term was probably first coined by SAFAR (1977). This term is used more freely by anesthetists. Neuro-surgeons, when they relieve otherwise fatal herniations of the brain, are not in the habit of calling the effort resuscitation. Since, in our opinion, the term brain resuscitation focuses attention on a set of measures in an acute catastrophic situation, we would like to support its use.

Type
Special Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation 1979

References

Brucw, D.A., Schut, L., Bruno, L.A., Wood, J. H., Sutton, L. N., (1978). Outcome Following Severe Head Injuries in Children, J. Neurosurg: 48, 679688Google Scholar
Safar, P., (1977). Brain Resuscotation Critical Care Medicine, Las Vegas, Nevads, February 20, 1997.Google Scholar