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Trace nutrients

5*. Minerals and vitamins in the British household food supply

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Janet Lewis
Affiliation:
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, 65 Romney Street, London SWIP 3RD
David H. Buss
Affiliation:
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, 65 Romney Street, London SWIP 3RD
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Abstract

1. The amounts of magnesium, copper, zinc, phosphorus, manganese, potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin E and dietary fibre in the British household diet were calculated by applying appropriate values from recent analytical studies to the amounts of foods recorded in the National Food Survey during 1986.

2. National average intakes were (mg/person per d): Mg 247, Cu 1.25, Zn 9.0, P 1249, Mn 3.43, K 2694, vitamin B6 1.73, vitamin B12 6.33μg, folate 230μg, pantothenic acid 6.07, biotin 35μg, vitamin E 8.4. Regional and income-group differences were estimated, and found to be small. Additional contributions from alcoholic drinks and confectionery were also determined.

3. Dietary fibre was estimated both as unavailable carbohydrate and as non-starch polysaccharide. The national average intakes were 21.8 and 12.9 g/d respectively.

4. Intakes were compared with Canadian (Department of National Health and Welfare, 1983) and American (National Research Council, 1980) recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). With the exception of biotin, the Canadian RDAs were met by the household diet but the much higher American RDAs were only met for vitamin B12 and pantothenic acid.

Type
Clinical and Human Nutrition papers: Studies in Man
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1988

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