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Sugar-beet fibre increases cholesterol and reduces bile acid excretion from the small bowel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2007

Anna Maria Langkilde
Affiliation:
Dept of Clinical Nutrition, The University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, S-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden
Henrik Andersson
Affiliation:
Dept of Clinical Nutrition, The University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, S-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden
Ingvar Bosaeus
Affiliation:
Dept of Clinical Nutrition, The University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, S-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden
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Abstract

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The effect of addition of sugar-beet fibre to the diet on sterol excretion from the small intestine was studied in nine ileostomy subjects. A constant low-fibre diet was given in two 3 d periods with and without 32 g sugar-beet fibre/d in random order. Care was taken to minimize bacterial alteration of the ileostomy contents. The addition of sugar-beet fibre increased net cholesterol excretion by 52 (SE 9)%(P < 0·01), from 294 (SE 99) to 451 (SE 124) mg/d, and decreased bile acid excretion by 26 (SE 15)% (P < 0·01), from 764 (SE 118) to 567 (SE 96) mg/d. The increased cholesterol and decreased bile acid excretion found with sugar-beet fibre addition is different from the pattern associated with fibre sources such as pectin and oat fibre. The interaction between dietary fibre and sterol metabolism may be mediated, therefore, by different mechanisms depending on the fibre source.

Type
Complex Carbohydrates and Lipid Metabolism
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1993

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