Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-gctlb Total loading time: 0.379 Render date: 2022-07-02T06:27:36.906Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Substrates available for colonic fermentation from oat, barley and wheat bread diets. A study in ileostomy subjects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Ågot Lia
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden
Birgitta Sundberg
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden
Per Åman
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden
Göran Hallmans
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden
Henrik Andersson
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Nutrients not absorbed in the small bowel will form substrates for microbial growth in the colon which may have implications for the development of colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether fibre-rich oat and barley diets increase the excretion of energy-supplying nutrients from the small bowel compared with a low-fibre wheat diet, and whether a possible. increase could be related to the β-glucan content. Nine ileastomy subjects were served four types of bread together with a low-fibre basal diet (12 g dietary fibre/d). The breads were based on either wheat flour (W diet, 7 g dietary fibre/d), oat bran (OB diet, 29 g dietary fibre/d), the same amount of oat bran with addition of β-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) (OBE diet, 19 g dietary fibre/d) or a fibre-rich barley fraction (B diet, 35 g dietary fibre/d). An increased ileal excretion of starch was observed with the barley diet but no effect of the oat β-glucan on starch recovery was found. The NSP + Klason lignin in the ileostomy effluents accounted only for 24, 31, 24 and 35% of the gross energy excretion in the W, OB, OBE and B diet periods respectively. A large part of the dry weight and energy (30, 21, 28 and 27%, in the W, OB, OBE and B diets respectively) in the effluents could not be identified as fat, protein, total starch or NSP + Klason lignin. This unidentified part was probably made up of oligosaccbarides, endogenous losses and nutrient complexes. Methods for identifying and analysing these components should be developed and their role as substrates for colonic fermentation and colon cancer development ought to be investigated.

Type
Human and Clinical Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

References

Altman, D. (1991). Practical Statistics for Medical Research, p. 535. London: Chapman and Hall.Google Scholar
Åman, P. & Graham, H. (1987). Analysis of total and insoluble mixed-linked (1 → 3), (1 → 4)-β-D-glucans in barley and oats. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 35, 704709.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Åman, P., Pettersson, D., Zhang, J.-X., Tidehag, P. & Hallmans, G. (1995). Starch and dietary fiber components are excreted and degraded to variable extents in ileostomy subjects consuming mixed diets with wheat or oat bran bread. Journal of Nutrition 125, 23412347.Google ScholarPubMed
Åman, P., Westerlund, E. & Theander, O. (1994). Determination of starch using a thermostable α-amylase. In Methods in Carbohydrate Chemistry, pp. 111115 [BeMiller, J.Manners, D. and Surgeon, R. editors]. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.Google Scholar
Andersson, H., Bosaeus, I., Ellegård, L., Hallgren, B., Hultén, L. & Magnusson, O. (1984 a). Comparison of an elemental and two polymeric diets in colectomized patients with and without intestinal resection. Clinical Nutrition 3, 183189.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andersson, H., Hultén, L., Magnusson, O. & Sandström, B. M. (1984 b). Energy and mineral utilization from a peptide-based elemental diet and a polymeric enteral diet given to ileostomists in the early postoperative course. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 8, 497500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Asp, N. G., Johansson, C. G., Hallmer, H. & Siljeström, M. (1983). Rapid enzymatic assay of insoluble and soluble dietary fiber. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 31, 476482.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bach Knudsen, K. E. & Hessov, I. (1995). Recovery of inulin from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in the small intestine of man. British Journal of Nutrition 74, 101113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bosaeus, I. & Andersson, H. (1987). Short-term effect of two cholesterol-lowering diets on sterol excretion in ileostomy subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, 5459.Google Scholar
Braaten, J. T., Wood, P. J., Scott, F. W., Riedel, K. D., Poste, L. M. & Collins, M. W. (1991). Oat gum lowers glucose and insulin after an oral glucose load. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53, 14251430.Google Scholar
Carlsson, N. G., Karlsson, H. & Sandberg, A. S. (1992). Determination of oligosaccharides in foods, diets, and intestinal contents by high-temperature gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 40, 24042412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cassidy, A., Bingham, S. A. & Cummings, J. H. (1994). Starch intake and colorectal cancer risk: an international comparison. British Journal of Cancer 69, 937942.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chacko, A. & Cummings, J. H. (1988). Nitrogen losses from the human small bowel: obligatory losses and the effect of physical form of food. Gut 29, 809815.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chapman, R. W., Sillery, J. K., Graham, M. M. & Saunders, D. R. (1985). Absorption of starch by healthy ileostomates: effect of transit time and of carbohydrate load. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 41, 12441248.Google ScholarPubMed
Cummings, J. H., Bingham, S. A., Heaton, K. W. & Eastwood, M. A. (1992). Fecal weight, colon cancer risk, and dietary intake of nonstarch polysaccharides (dietary fiber). Gastroenterology 103, 17831789.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cummings, J. H., Pomare, E. W., Branch, W. J., Naylor, C. P. E. & Macfarlane, G. T. (1987). Short chain fatty acids in human large intestine, portal, hepatic and venous blood. Gut 28, 12211227.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Drasar, B. S. & Hill, M. J. (1974). Human Intestinal Flora, pp. 3643. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Dubois, M., Gilles, K. A., Hamilton, J. K., Reben, P. A. & Smith, F. (1956). Colorimetric method for determination of sugars and related substances. Analytical Chemistry 28, 350356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Englyst, H. N. & Cummings, J. H. (1985). Digestion of the polysaccharides of some cereal foods in the human small intestine. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 42, 778787.Google ScholarPubMed
Englyst, H. N. & Cummings, J. H. (1987). Digestion of polysaccharides of potato in the small intestine of man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, 423431.Google Scholar
Englyst, H. N., Kingman, S. M. & Cummings, J. H. (1992). Classification and measurement of nutritionally important starch fractions. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 46, S33–S50.Google Scholar
Finegold, S. M., Sutter, V. L., Boyle, J. D. & Shimada, K. (1970). The normal flora of ileostomy and transverse colostomy effluents. Journal of Infectious Diseases 122, 376381.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hill, G. L. (1976). Ileostomy, Surgery, Physiology, and Management. New York: Grune and Stratton.Google ScholarPubMed
Holgate, A. M. & Read, N. W. (1983). Relationship between small bowel transit time and absorption of a solid meal. Influence of metoclopramide, magnesium sulfate, and lactulose. Digestive Diseases and Sciences 28, 812819.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Howe, G. R., Benito, E., Castelleto, R., Cornée, J., Estève, J., Gallagher, R. P., Iscovich, J. M., Deng-ao, J., Kaaks, R., Kune, G. A., Kune, S., L'Abbé, K. A., Lee, H. P., Miller, A. B., Peters, R. K., Potter, J. D., Riboli, E., Slattery, M. L., Trichopoulos, D., Tuyns, A., Tzonou, A., Whittlemore, A. S., Wu-Williams, A. H. & Zheng, S. (1992). Dietary intake of fiber and decreased risk of cancer of the colon and rectum: evidence from the combined analysis of 13 case-control studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 84, 18871896.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, Y. S., Tsao, D., Siddiqui, B., Whitehead, J. S., Arnstein, P., Bennett, J. & Hicks, J. (1980). Effects of sodium butyrate and dimethylsulfoxide on biochemical properties of human colon cancer cells. Cancer 45, 11851192.3.0.CO;2-W>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lia, Å., Hallmans, G., Sandberg, A. S., Sundberg, B., Åman, P. & Andersson, H. (1995). Oat β-glucan increases bile acid excretion and a fibre-rich barley fraction increases cholesterol excretion. A study in ileostomy subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 62, 12451251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Livesey, G. (1991). Calculating the energy values of foods: towards new empirical formulae based on diets with varied intakes of unavailable complex carbohydrates. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, 112.Google ScholarPubMed
Livesey, G., Wilkinson, J. A., Roe, M., Faulks, R., Clark, S., Brown, J. C., Kennidy, H. & Elia, M. (1995). Influence of the physical form of barley grain on the digestion of its starch in the human small intestine and implications for health. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 61, 7581.Google Scholar
Macfarlane, G. T. & Cummings, J. H. (1991). The colonic flora, fermentation, and large bowel digestive function. In The Large Intestine: Physiology, Pathophysiology and Disease, pp. 5191 [Philips, S. F.Pemberton, J. H. and Shorter, R. G. editors]. New York: Raven Press, Ltd.Google Scholar
MacGregor, A. W. & Batty, R. S. (1993). Barley, Chemistry and Technology. St Paul, MN: American Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc.Google Scholar
McNeil, N. I. (1984). The contribution of the large intestine to energy supplies in man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 39, 338342.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pomeranz, Y. (1988). Wheat Chemistry and Technology. St Paul, MN: American Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc.Google Scholar
Roediger, W. E. W. (1980). Role of anaerobic bacteria in the metabolic welfare of the colonic mucosa in man. Gut 21, 793798.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sandberg, A. S., Ahderinne, R., Andersson, H., Hallgren, B. & Hultén, L. (1983). The effects of citrus pectin on the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 37C, 429440.Google Scholar
Sandberg, A. S., Andersson, H., Hallgren, B., Hasselblad, K. & Isaksson, B. (1981). Experimental model for in vivo determination of dietary fibre and its effect on the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine. British Journal of Nutrition 45, 283294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scheppach, W., Bach, M., Bartram, P., Christl, S., Bergthaller, W. & Kasper, H. (1991). Colonic fermentation of potato starch after a freeze-thaw cycle. Digestive Diseases and Sciences 36, 16011605.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scheppach, W., Fabian, C., Sachs, M. & Kasper, H. (1988). Effect of starch malabsorption on fecal SCFA excretion in man. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 23, 755759.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schweizer, T. F., Andersson, H., Langkilde, A. M., Reimann, S. & Torsdottir, I. (1990). Nutrients excreted in the ileostomy effluents after consumption of mixed diets with bread and potatoes. II. Starch, dietary fibre and sugars. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 44, 567575.Google ScholarPubMed
Siegel, S. & Castellan, N. J. (1988). Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, 2nd ed. Singapore: McGraw-Hill Book Co.Google Scholar
Southgate, D. A. T. & Durnin, J. V. G. A. (1970). Calorie conversion factors. An experimental reassessment of the factors used in the calculaJion of the energy value of human diets. British Journal of Nutrition 24, 517535.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sundberg, B., Pettersson, D. & Åman, P. (1995). Nutritional properties of fibre-rich barley products fed to broiler chickens. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 67, 469476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swallow, K. W. & Low, N. H. (1990). Analysis and quantitation of the carbohydrates in honey using high-performance liquid chromatography. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 38, 18281832.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Systat (1992). Systat for Windows: Statistics, Version 5 Edition. Evanston, IL: Systat, Inc.Google ScholarPubMed
Theander, O., Åman, P., Westerlund, E., Andersson, R. & Pettersson, D. (1995). Total dietary fiber determined as neutral sugar and uronic acid residues, and lignin (the Uppsala method): collaborative study. Journal of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists 78, 10301044.Google ScholarPubMed
Tornqvist, H., Rissanen, A. & Andersson, H. (1986). Balance studies in patients with intestinal resection. British Journal of Nutrition 56, 1116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trock, B., Lanza, E. & Greenwald, P. (1990). Dietary fiber, vegetables, and colon cancer: critical review and meta-analyses of the epidemiologic evidence. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 82, 650661.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Webster, F. H. (editor) (1986). Oats, Chemistry and Technology. St Paul, MN: American Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc.Google Scholar
Westerlund, E., Theander, O., Andersson, R. & Åman, P. (1989). Effects of baking on polysaccharides in white bread fractions. Journal of Cereal Science 10, 149156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolever, T. M. S., Cohen, Z., Thompson, L. U., Thorne, M. J., Jenkins, M. J. A., Prokipchuk, E. J. & Jenkins, D. J. A. (1986). Ileal loss of available carbohydrate in man: comparison of a breath hydrogen method with direct measurement using a human ileostomy model. American Journal of Gastroenterology 81, 115122.Google ScholarPubMed
Wood, P. J. (editor) (1993). Oat Bran. St Paul, MN: American Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc.Google Scholar
Wood, P. J., Braaten, J. T., Scott, F. W., Riedel, D. K., Wolynetz, M. S. & Collins, M. W. (1994). Effect of dose and modification of viscous properties of oat gum on plasma glucose and insulin following an oral glucose load. British Journal of Nutrition 72, 731743.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
World Health Organization (1985). Energy and Protein Requirements. WHO Technical Report Series no. 124. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
You have Access
21
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Substrates available for colonic fermentation from oat, barley and wheat bread diets. A study in ileostomy subjects
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Substrates available for colonic fermentation from oat, barley and wheat bread diets. A study in ileostomy subjects
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Substrates available for colonic fermentation from oat, barley and wheat bread diets. A study in ileostomy subjects
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *