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Simulation of prospective phytosterol intake in Germany by novel functional foods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2007

Karolin Kuhlmann
Affiliation:
University of Applied Sciences Münster, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Corrensstrasse 25, D-48149, Münster, Germany
Oliver Lindtner
Affiliation:
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Nutritional Medicine, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195, Berlin, Germany
Almut Bauch
Affiliation:
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Nutritional Medicine, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195, Berlin, Germany
Guido Ritter
Affiliation:
University of Applied Sciences Münster, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Corrensstrasse 25, D-48149, Münster, Germany
Brigitte Woerner
Affiliation:
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Nutritional Medicine, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195, Berlin, Germany
Birgit Niemann
Affiliation:
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Nutritional Medicine, Thielallee 88-92, D-14195, Berlin, Germany
Corresponding
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Abstract

A blood cholesterol-lowering margarine containing plant sterolesters was the first functional food placed on the European food market pursuant to the regulation (EC) 258/97. In the following years nine further applicants submitted the request to add plant sterol compounds to dairy products, cheeses, bakery products, sausages, plant oils and other products. The European Scientific Committee on Food (SCF) declared a precautionary intake limit of 3 g plant sterols per d by multiple dietary sources. Using the consumption data of the German National Food Consumption Study, carried out from 1985 to 1988 with 23 209 participants, we hypothetically added 0·3–2 g plant sterols to usual daily servings of ten different food products, selected from the novel food applications. We calculated the prospective plant sterol intake regarding each kind of enriched food and by stepwise accumulation of different functional foods in three enrichment scenarios. Within our enrichment context we find a phytosterol intake satiation, if multiple plant sterol-enriched foods are eaten. An enrichment amount of 2 g plant sterols per proposed food serving size results in an intake maximum of 13 g/d.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2005

References

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