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The importance of the body's need for zinc in determining Zn availability in food: a principle demonstrated in the rat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Göran Hallmans
Affiliation:
Biophysics Laboratory, University of Umeå, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Ulf Nilsson
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Rolf Sjöström
Affiliation:
Department of Oral Roentgenology, University of Umeå, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Lars Wetter
Affiliation:
Department of PathologyUniversity of Umeå, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Kenneth Wing
Affiliation:
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Umeå, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
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Abstract

1. The hypothesis that the availability of zinc in a food is limited by factors in the food was tested against the hypothesis that Zn absorption is homeostatically regulated by the body according to its need for Zn.

2. The experimental model used was the short-term administration to rats of a parenteral nutrition solution with no added Zn in an attempt to increase their need for Zn in an anabolic phase.

3. The absorption and retention of 65Zn from a piece of endosperm-wheat crisp-bread in rats injected intraperitoneally with the parenteral nutrition solution was more than 40% higher than that in a control group injected with physiological saline (9 g sodium chloride/l).

4. The results indicate that the availability of Zn in the bread is not fixed but variable and dependent on the body's need for Zn.

Type
Clinical and Human Nutrition papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1987

References

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