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Effects of meal consumption on whole body leucine and alanine kinetics in young adult men

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2008

Leonard J. Hoffer
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Human Nutrition and Clinical Research Center, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
Russell D. Yang
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Human Nutrition and Clinical Research Center, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
Dwight E. Matthews
Affiliation:
Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
Bruce R. Bistrian
Affiliation:
The Cancer Research InstituteNew England Deaconess Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA
Dennis M. Bier
Affiliation:
Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
Vernon R. Young
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Human Nutrition and Clinical Research Center, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
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Abstract

1. The effects of meal consumption on plasma leucine and alanine kinetics were studied using a simultaneous, primed, continuous infusion of L-[I-13C]leucine and L-[3,3,3-2H3]alanine in four healthy, young, adult male subjects. The study included an evaluation of the effect of sampling site on plasma amino acid kinetics, with blood being drawn simultaneously from an antecubital and dorsal heated hand vein.

2. In comparison with the postabsorptive state, the ingestion of small hourly meals resulted in a 35% increase in plasma leucine flux and a 77% increase in leucine oxidation. Calculated entry of leucine into the plasma compartment from endogenous sources decreased by 65%. Plasma alanine flux more than doubled, indicating a significant enhancement in de now alanine synthesis. 13C enrichment of leucine in venous and arterialized plasma did not differ significantly, but alanine flux calculated from isotopic measurement in venous plasma was substantially greater than that based on analysis of arterialized blood plasma.

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1985

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Effects of meal consumption on whole body leucine and alanine kinetics in young adult men
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