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The effect of carbohydrate and fat variation in euenergetic diets on postabsorptive free fatty acid release

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Peter H. Bisschop*
Affiliation:
Departments of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
Mariëtte T. Ackermans
Affiliation:
Clinical Chemistry, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Erik Endert
Affiliation:
Clinical Chemistry, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
An F. C. Ruiter
Affiliation:
Clinical Chemistry, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Alfred J. Meijer
Affiliation:
Biochemistry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Folkert Kuipers
Affiliation:
Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Academic Hospital Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands
Hans P. Sauerwein
Affiliation:
Departments of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Johannes A. Romijn
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
*
*Corresponding author:Dr Peter H. Bisschop, fax +31 20 6917682, email P.H.Bisschop@amc.uva.nl
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Abstract

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Diet composition and energy content modulate free fatty acid (FFA) release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose–response effects of euenergetic variations in dietary carbohydrate and fat content on postabsorptive FFA release. The rate of appearance (Ra) of palmitate was measured by infusion of [2,2-2H2]palmitate after an overnight fast in six healthy men on three separate occasions, i.e. after 7 d on euenergetic control, high-carbohydrate and high-fat diets. The protein content and composition was identical for each diet. Postabsorptive plasma fatty acid concentrations were not different between the high-carbohydrate and control diets (0·36 (SE 0·07) V. 0·43 (se 0·04) mmol/l), but were increased after the high-fat diet (0·75 (se 0·09) mmol/l, (P<0·01 compared with the other diets). Ra palmitate was not different between the high-carbohydrate and control diets (1·36 (se 0·20) v. 1·47 (se 0·15) μmol/kg per min). However, Ra palmitate was increased to 2·36 (se 0·26) μmol/kg per min after the high-fat diet (P<0·01 compared with the other diets). The fatty acid flux and whole-body fat oxidation were not affected by the high-carbohydrate diet compared with the control diet, but were increased by 67 and 47 % respectively, on the high-fat diet (P<0·01 compared with the other diets). A euenergetic high-fat diet results in increased postabsorptive FFA release and fat oxidation, whereas a euenergetic high-carbohydrate diet does not affect these variables of fat metabolism.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2002

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