Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-5dv6l Total loading time: 0.148 Render date: 2021-06-18T03:23:24.940Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Body composition of goat kids during sucking. Voluntary feed intake

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

M. R. Sanz Sampelayo
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), Departamento de Fisiologia Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
I. Ruiz
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), Departamento de Fisiologia Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
F. Gil
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), Departamento de Fisiologia Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
J. Boza
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidin (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), Departamento de Fisiologia Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

The body composition of thirty-eight Granadina goat kids was measured. Six animals were slaughtered at birth while the remainder were kept individually at an environmental temperature of 24±2° and a relative humidity of 60±5%. They were given goat's milk or a milk-substitute at two planes of nutrition until 15 or 30 d of age and then slaughtered. The goat's milk and milk-substitute contained 260.4 and 222.0 g digestible protein/kg and 23.23 and 20.85 MJ metabolizable energy/kg respectively. Voluntary feed intake as metabolizable energy was a function of metabolic body-weight (kg W0.75), equivalent to 2.42 and 2.44 times the energy requirement for maintenance for goat's milk- and milk-substitute-fed animals respectively. There was a high degree of correlation between the empty-body concentration of dry matter, fat and energy and empty-body-weight (P < 0.001) or animal age (P < 0.001), and between body-weight and animal age (P < 0.001). The relationships between empty-body composition and empty-body-weight were independent of type of milk or plane of nutrition. In contrast relationships between empty-body composition or empty-body-weight and animal age were affected by the type of milk and, over all, by the plane of nutrition. All these results show that in these animals any body-weight will have a similar composition, but it will be reached earlier or later depending on dietary regimen and always with the limitation of voluntary intake.

Type
Diet and Development
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1990

References

Agricultural Research Council (1980). The Nutrient Requirements of Ruminant Livestock. Slough: Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux.Google Scholar
Bas, P. (1988). Influence of weaning age on growth, body composition and lipid metabolism of Alpine male kids. PhD. Thesis, University of Paris.Google Scholar
Campbell, R. G. & Dunkin, A. C. (1983). The effects of energy intake and dietary protein on nitrogen retention, growth performance, body composition and some aspects of energy metabolism of baby pigs. British Journal of Nutrition 49, 221230.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fraga, M. J., Torres, A., Pérez, E., Galvez, J. F. & De Blas, J. C. (1978). Body composition in suckling rabbits. Journal of Animal Science 47, 166175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gall, C. (1982). Carcass composition. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Goat Production and Disease pp. 472487. Tucson: Dairy Goat Journal Publishing Co.Google Scholar
Hodge, R. W. (1974). Efficiency of food conversion and body composition of the preruminant lamb and the young pig. British Journal of Nutrition 32, 113126.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jagusch, K. T., Duganzich, D. M., Kido, G. T. & Church, S. M. (1983). Efficiency of goat milk utilisation by milkfed kids. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 26, 443445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morand-Fehr, P., Rouzeau, A. & Hervieu, J. (1985). Development of characteristics of adipose deposits in male kids during growth from birth to weaning. Animal Production 41, 349357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norton, B. W., Jagusch, K. T. & Walker, D. M. (1970). Body composition studies with the milk fed lamb. III. The effect of the protein and energy intake on the composition of the live weight gain. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 75, 287292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanz Sampelayo, M. R., Muñoz, F. J., Lara, L., Gil Extremera, F. & Boza, J. (1987). Factors affecting pre- and post-weaning growth and body composition in kid goats of the Granadina breed. Animal Production 45, 233238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanz Sampelayo, M. R., Muñoz, F. J., Guerrero, J. E., Gil Extremera, F. & Boza, J. (1988). Energy metabolism of the Granadina breed goat kid. Use of goat milk and a milk replacer. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 59, 19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spencer, S. A. & Hull, D. (1984). The effect of over-feeding of newborn rabbits on somatic and visceral growth, body composition and long-term growth potential. British Journal of Nutrition 51, 389402.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ternouth, J. H., Stobo, I. J. F., Roy, J. H. B. & Beattie, A. W. (1985). The effect of milk substitute concentration upon the intake, digestion and growth of calves. Animal Production 41, 151159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vermorel, M. (1975). Le métabolisme énergétique du veau et de I'agneau préruminants. Les industries de l'Alimentation Animale 1, 926.Google Scholar
Vermorel, M., Bouvier, J. C. & Geay, Y. (1979). Energy utilization by growing calves: effects of age, milk intake and feeding level. In Energy Metabolism, pp. 4953 (Mount, L. E., editor). London: Butterworths.Google Scholar
Walker, D. M. (1986) Body composition of animals during sucking and the immediate post-weaning period. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 45, 8189.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walker, D. M. & Norton, B. N. (1970). The utilization of energy by the milk-fed lamb. In Energy Metabolism, pp. 125128 (Schurch, A. and Wenk, C., editors), Zurich: Jüris Orion-Verlag.Google ScholarPubMed
You have Access
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Body composition of goat kids during sucking. Voluntary feed intake
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Body composition of goat kids during sucking. Voluntary feed intake
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Body composition of goat kids during sucking. Voluntary feed intake
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *