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DHA supplementation in infants born preterm and the effect on attention at 18 months’ corrected age: follow-up of a subset of the N3RO randomised controlled trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2020

Erandi Hewawasam
Affiliation:
Food and Nutrition Research Group, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia
Carmel T. Collins
Affiliation:
SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia Adelaide Medical School, Discipline of Paediatrics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Beverly S. Muhlhausler
Affiliation:
Food and Nutrition Research Group, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
Lisa N. Yelland
Affiliation:
SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia
Lisa G. Smithers
Affiliation:
School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, SA 5005, Australia Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia
John Colombo
Affiliation:
Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies and Department of Psychology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
Maria Makrides
Affiliation:
SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia Adelaide Medical School, Discipline of Paediatrics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Andrew J. McPhee
Affiliation:
SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia Neonatal Medicine, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia
Jacqueline F. Gould
Affiliation:
SAHMRI Women and Kids, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia Adelaide Medical School, Discipline of Paediatrics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia School of Psychology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Infants born preterm miss out on the peak period of in utero DHA accretion to the brain during the last trimester of pregnancy which is hypothesised to contribute to the increased prevalence of neurodevelopmental deficits in this population. This study aimed to determine whether DHA supplementation in infants born preterm improves attention at 18 months’ corrected age. This is a follow-up of a subset of infants who participated in the N3RO randomised controlled trial. Infants were randomised to receive an enteral emulsion of high-dose DHA (60 mg/kg per d) or no DHA (soya oil – control) from within the first days of birth until 36 weeks’ post-menstrual age. The assessment of attention involved three tasks requiring the child to maintain attention on toy/s in either the presence or absence of competition or a distractor. The primary outcome was the child’s latency of distractibility when attention was focused on a toy. The primary outcome was available for seventy-three of the 120 infants that were eligible to participate. There was no evidence of a difference between groups in the latency of distractibility (adjusted mean difference: 0·08 s, 95 % CI –0·81, 0·97; P = 0·86). Enteral DHA supplementation did not result in improved attention in infants born preterm at 18 months’ corrected age.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Authors 2020

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DHA supplementation in infants born preterm and the effect on attention at 18 months’ corrected age: follow-up of a subset of the N3RO randomised controlled trial
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