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Association of green tea consumption with prediabetes, diabetes and markers of glucose metabolism in rural Vietnam: a cross-sectional study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2024

Ami Fukunaga*
Affiliation:
Department of Community and Global Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Masamine Jimba
Affiliation:
Department of Community and Global Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Thuy Thi Phuong Pham
Affiliation:
Department of Non-communicable Disease Control and Nutrition, Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Chau Que Nguyen
Affiliation:
Department of Non-communicable Disease Control and Nutrition, Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Dong Van Hoang
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Tien Vu Phan
Affiliation:
Medical Service Center, Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Aki Yazawa
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston MA, USA
Danh Cong Phan
Affiliation:
Department of Non-communicable Disease Control and Nutrition, Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Masahiko Hachiya
Affiliation:
Bureau of International Health Cooperation, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Huy Xuan Le
Affiliation:
Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Hung Thai Do
Affiliation:
Pasteur Institute in Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam
Tetsuya Mizoue
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Yosuke Inoue
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
*
*Corresponding author: Ami Fukunaga, email ami4693jm@gmail.com

Abstract

The literature on green tea consumption and glucose metabolism has reported conflicting findings. This cross-sectional study examined the association of green tea consumption with abnormal glucose metabolism among 3000 rural residents aged 40–60 years in Khánh Hòa province in Vietnam. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of green tea consumption (0, < 200, 200–< 400, 400–< 600 or ≥ 600 ml/d) with prediabetes and diabetes (based on the American Diabetes Association criteria). Linear regression analysis was performed to examine the association between green tea consumption and the log-transformed homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (a marker of insulin resistance) and the log-transformed homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) (a marker of insulin secretion). The OR for prediabetes and diabetes among participants who consumed ≥ 600 ml/d v. those who did not consume green tea were 1·61 (95 % CI = 1·07, 2·42) and 2·04 (95 % CI = 1·07, 3·89), respectively. Higher green tea consumption was associated with a higher level of log-transformed HOMA-IR (Pfor trend = 0·04) but not with a lower level of log-transformed HOMA-β (Pfor trend = 0·75). Higher green tea consumption was positively associated with the prevalence of prediabetes, diabetes and insulin resistance in rural Vietnam. The findings of this study indicated prompting the need for further research considering context in understanding the link between green tea consumption and glucose metabolism, especially in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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