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The Student Counselling Centre at the University of Crete, Greece

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Panos Bitsios
Affiliation:
Medical School, University of Crete, Greece, email bitsiosp@uoc.gr
Evangelos Karademas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
Angeliki Mouzaki
Affiliation:
Department of Primary Education, University of Crete, Greece
George Manolitsis
Affiliation:
Department of Preschool Education, University of Crete, Greece
Ourania Kapellaki
Affiliation:
Student Counselling Centre, University of Crete, Greece
Anastasia Diacatou
Affiliation:
Student Counselling Centre, University of Crete, Greece
Arianna Archontaki
Affiliation:
Student Counselling Centre, University of Crete, Greece
George Mamalakis
Affiliation:
Student Counselling Centre, University of Crete, Greece
Theodoros Giovazolias
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
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Abstract

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This report describes the Student Counselling Centre (SCC) at the University of Crete. The SCS was established in 2003. Its main areas of activity are individual and group psychological support, crisis intervention, research, prevention, volunteering and awareness. Emphasis is also put on the support provided to students with special needs, which is now the second core service of the SCC.

Type
Special Paper
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2017

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