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Genetic sensitivity to the environment, across lifetime

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2012

Judith R. Homberg
Affiliation:
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Centre for Neuroscience, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 EZ Nijmegen, The Netherlands. j.homberg@cns.umcn.nl
Corresponding
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Abstract

The target article by Charney convincingly argues that genomic plasticity perinatally induced by the environment creates a complication in determining which parts of behavior are attributed to nature and which to nurture. I argue that real life is even more complex because (1) genotype influences sensitivity to environmental stimuli, and (2) the genome continues to be modified throughout life.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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