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En route to disentangle the impact and neurobiological substrates of early vocalizations: Learning from Rett syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2014

Peter B. Marschik
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Research Unit iDN – Interdisciplinary Developmental Neuroscience, Medical University of Graz Austria, 8010 Graz, Austria. peter.marschik@medunigraz.at christa.einspieler@medunigraz.at www.medunigraz.at/physiologie/pbmarschik www.medunigraz.at/physiologie/ceinspieler
Walter E. Kaufmann
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115. walter.kaufmann@childrens.harvard.edu http://www.iddrc.org/childrens-hospital-boston/index.php/investigators/details/walter_e._kaufmann_md
Sven Bölte
Affiliation:
Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Solna 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.bolte@ki.se www.ki.se/kind
Jeff Sigafoos
Affiliation:
School of Educational Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6012, New Zealand. jeff.sigafoos@vuw.ac.nz http://www.victoria.ac.nz/education/about/staff/ed-psy-ped-staff/jeff-sigafoos
Christa Einspieler
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Research Unit iDN – Interdisciplinary Developmental Neuroscience, Medical University of Graz Austria, 8010 Graz, Austria. peter.marschik@medunigraz.at christa.einspieler@medunigraz.at www.medunigraz.at/physiologie/pbmarschik www.medunigraz.at/physiologie/ceinspieler

Abstract

Research on acoustic communication and its underlying neurobiological substrates has led to new insights about the functioning of central pattern generators (CPGs). CPG-related atypicalities may point to brainstem irregularities rather than cortical malfunctions for early vocalizations/babbling. The “vocal pattern generator,” together with other CPGs, seems to have great potential in disentangling neurodevelopmental disorders and potentially predict neurological development.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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