Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-pgkvd Total loading time: 0.458 Render date: 2022-08-09T23:24:23.984Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Syllabic patterns in the early vocalizations of Quichua children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2011

CHRISTINA E. GILDERSLEEVE-NEUMANN*
Affiliation:
Portland State University
BARBARA L. DAVIS
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
PETER F. MACNEILAGE
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
*
ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Christina Gildersleeve-Neumann, Speech and Hearing Sciences Department, P.O. Box 751, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97207-0751. E-mail: cegn@pdx.edu

Abstract

To understand the interactions between production patterns common to children regardless of language environment and the early appearance of production effects based on perceptual learning from the ambient language requires the study of languages with diverse phonological properties. Few studies have evaluated early phonological acquisition patterns of children in non-Indo-European language environments. In the current study, across- and within-syllable consonant–vowel co-occurrence patterns in babbling were analyzed for a 6-month period for seven Ecuadorean Quichua learning children who were between 9 and 17 months of age at study onset. Their babbling utterances were compared to the babbling of six English-learning children between 9 and 22 months of age. Child patterns for both languages were compared with Quichua and English ambient language patterns. Babbling output was highly similar for the child groups: Quichua and English children's babbling demonstrated similar predicted within-syllable (coronal-front vowel, labial-central vowel, dorsal-back vowel) patterns, and across-syllable manner variegation patterns for consonants. These patterns were observed at significantly greater rates in the child groups than in the respective adult language input patterns, suggesting production system influences common to children across languages rather than ambient language perceptual learning effects during these children's babbling period.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Acevedo, M. A. 1993). Development of Spanish consonants in preschool children. Journal of Childhood Communication Disorders, 15, 915.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boysson-Bardies, B. (1993). Ontogeny of language-specific syllabic productions. In Boysson-Bardies, B., Schonen, D. S., Jusczyk, P., MacNeilage, P., & Morton, J. (Eds.), Developmental neurocognition: Speech and face processing in the first year of life (pp. 353363). Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boysson-Bardies, B., & Vihman, M. (1991). Adaptation to language: Evidence from babbling and first words in four languages. Language, 67, 297319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bush, C. N., Edwards, M. L., Luckau, J. M., Stoel, C. M., Macken, M. A., & Peterson, J. D. (1973). On specifying a system for transcribing consonants in child language. Stanford, CA: Stanford University, Stanford Child Language Project.Google Scholar
Cerrón-Palomino, R. (1987). Lingüística Quechua. Cuzco, Perú: Centro de Estudios Rurales Andinos “Bartolomé de las Casas.”Google Scholar
Chen, L., & Kent, R. D. (2005). Consonant-vowel co-occurrence patterns in Mandarin-learning infants. Journal of Child Language, 32, 507534.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (1990). The acquisition of vowels: a case study. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 33, 1627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (1994). Organization of babbling: A case study. Language and Speech, 37, 341355.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (1995). The articulatory basis of babbling. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 38, 11991211.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davis, B. L., MacNeilage, P. F., & Matyear, C. L. (2002). Acquisition of serial complexity in speech production: A comparison of phonetic and phonological approaches to first word production. Phonetica, 59, 75107.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dolata, J. K., Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (2008). Characteristics of the rhythmic organization of babbling: Implications for an amodal linguistic rhythm. Infant Behavior and Development, 31, 422431.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garcés, L. F. (1996). Notas sobre la fonología del quichua ecuatoriano. Quito, Ecuador: Universidad Politécnica Salesiana.Google Scholar
Gildersleeve-Neumann, C. E., Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (2000). Contingencies governing the production of fricatives, affricates, and liquids in babbling. Applied Psycholinguistics, 21, 341363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hess, C. G. (1992). La racionalidad de una economía agropecuaria. Quito, Ecuador: Abya Yala.Google Scholar
Jakielski, K. J. (1998). Motor organization in the acquisition of consonant clusters. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of Texas, Austin.Google Scholar
Kent, R. D., & Bauer, H. R. (1985). Vocalizations of one year olds. Journal of Child Language, 12, 491526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kern, S., & Davis, B. L. (2009). Emergent complexity in early vocal acquisition: Cross-linguistic comparisons of canonical babbling. In Chitoran, I., Coupé, C., Marsico, E., & Pellegrino, F., (Eds.), (Approaches to phonological complexity, phonology and phonetics series (pp. 353376). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Kern, S., Davis, B., & Zink, I. (2009). From babbling to first words in four languages: Common trends, cross language and individual differences. In Hombert, J. M. & d'Errico, F. (Eds.), Becoming eloquent (pp. 205232). Cambridge: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ladefoged, P. (2006). A course in phonetics (5th ed.). Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt College Javanovich.Google Scholar
Lee, S., Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (2007). “Frame dominance” and the serial organization of babbling and first words in Korean-learning infants. Phonetic, 64, 217236.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, S., Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (2008). Segmental properties of input to infants: A study of Korean. Journal of Child Language, 35, 591617.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, S., Davis, B. L., & MacNeilage, P. F. (2009). Universal production patterns and ambient language influences in babbling: A cross-linguistic study of Korean- and English-learning infants. Journal of Child Language, 37, 293318.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Locke, J. L. (1983). Phonological acquisition and change. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Lombeida-Naranjo, E. B. (1976). Ecuadorean highland Quechua phonology. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of Texas, Austin.Google Scholar
MacNeilage, P. F., & Davis, B. L. (1990). Acquisition of speech production: The achievement of segmental independence. In Hardcastle, W. J. & Marchal, A. (Eds.), Speech production and speech modelling (pp. 5566). Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacNeilage, P. F., & Davis, B. L. (1999). Evolution of the form of spoken words. Evolution of Communication, 3, 320.Google Scholar
MacNeilage, P. F., & Davis, B. L. (2000). On the origin of internal structure of word forms. Science, 288, 527531.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MacNeilage, P. F., Davis, B. L., Kinney, A., & Matyear, C. L. (2000). The motor core of speech: A comparison of serial organization patterns in infants and languages. Child Development, 71, 153163.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maddieson, I. (1984). Patterns of sounds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Masaquiza, F. C., & Marlett, S. A. (2008). Salasaca Quichua. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 38, 223227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCullagh, O., & Nelder, J. A. (1989). Generalized linear models (2nd ed.). London: Chapman & Hall.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menard, L., Schwartz, J.-L., Boe, L.-J., & Aubin, J. (2006). Articulatory–acoustic relationships during vocal tract growth for French vowels: Analysis of real data and simulations with an articulatory model. Journal of Phonetics, 35, 119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, P. R., & Kent, R. D. (1990). Phonetic variation in multisyllabic babbling. Journal of Child Language, 17, 247265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moya, R. (1987). Principios de lingüística quichua (Vol. 5). Quito, Ecuador: Centro de documentación e información de los movimientos sociales del Ecuador (CEDIME).Google Scholar
Nathani, S., Ertmer, D. J., & Stark, R. E. (2006). Assessing vocal development in infants and toddlers. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 20, 351369.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oller, D. K., & Delgado, R. (2000). Logical International Phonetics Program (Version 2.02) [Computer software]. Miami, FL: Intelligent Hearing Systems.Google Scholar
Oller, D. K. (2000). The emergence of the speech capacity. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Oller, D. K., & Eilers, R. E. (1982). Similarity of babbling in Spanish- and English-learning babies. Journal of Child Language, 9, 565577.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oller, D. K., & Lynch, M. P. (1992). Child vocalizations & innovations in infraphonology: Toward a broader theory of development and disorders. In Ferguson, C. A., Menn, L., & Stoel-Gammon, C. (Eds.), Phonological development: Models, research, implications (pp. 509536). Timonium, MD: York Press.Google Scholar
Oller, D. K., & Steffans, M. L. (1993). Syllables and segments in child vocalizations and young child speech. In Yavas, M. M. (Ed.), First and second language phonology (pp. 4562). San Diego, CA: Singular Press.Google Scholar
Orr, C. (1978). Dialectos quichua del Ecuador (Vol. 2). Quito, Ecuador: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano.Google Scholar
Porter, J. H., & Hodson, B. W. (2001). Collaborating to obtain phonological acquisition data for local schools. Language, Speech, & Hearing Services in the Schools, 32, 162171.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Redford, M. A., MacNeilage, P. F., & Davis, B. L. (1997). Perceptual and motor influences on final consonant inventories in babbling. Phonetica, 54, 172186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rousset, I. (2003). From lexical to syllabic organization: Favored and disfavored co-occurrences. Paper presented at the 15th International Congress of Phonetics, Autonomous University of Barcelona.Google Scholar
Rvachew, S., Alhaidary, A., Mattock, K., & Polka, L. (2008). Emergence of the corner vowels in the babble produced by infants exposed to Canadian English or Canadian French. Journal of Phonetics, 36, 564577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saffran, J. R., Aslin, R. N., & Newport, E. L. (1996). Statistical learning by 8 month old infants. Science, 274, 19261928.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smit, A., Hand, L., Frelinger, J., Bernthal, J., & Byrd, A. (1990). The Iowa articulation norms project and its Nebraska replication. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 55, 779798.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stoel-Gammon, C. (1985). Phonetic inventories, 15–24 months: A longitudinal study. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 28, 505512.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Swingley, D. (2008). The roots of the early vocabulary in infants' learning from speech. Psychological Science, 17, 308312.Google ScholarPubMed
Torero, A. (1972). Lingüística e historia de la sociedad andina. In Escobar, A. (Ed.), El reto del multilingüismo en el Perú (pp. 51106). Lima: IEP.Google Scholar
Torero, A. (1983). La familia lingüística quechua. In Pottier, B. (Ed.), America latina en sus lenguas indígenas (pp. 6192). Caracas: UNESCO–Monte Avila.Google Scholar
Vihman, M., Ferguson, C., & Elbert, M. (1986). Phonological development from babbling to speech: Common tendencies and individual differences. Applied Psycholinguistics, 7, 340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vihman, M. M. (1992). Early syllables and the construction of phonology. In Ferguson, C. A., Menn, L., & Stoel-Gammon, C. (Eds.), Phonological development: Models, research, implications (pp. 393421). Timonium, MD: York Press.Google Scholar
Vihman, M. M., & McCune, L. (1994). When is a word a word? Journal of Child Language, 21, 517542.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yoshida, K., Fennell, C., Swingley, D., & Werker, J. F. (2009). Fourteen-month-old infants learn similar sounding words. Developmental Science, 12, 412418.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zmarich, C., & Lanni, R. A. (1999). Phonetic and acoustic study of babbling in an Italian child. Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing.Google Scholar
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Syllabic patterns in the early vocalizations of Quichua children
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Syllabic patterns in the early vocalizations of Quichua children
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Syllabic patterns in the early vocalizations of Quichua children
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *