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  • ISSN: 0267-1905 (Print), 1471-6356 (Online)
  • Editor: Alison Mackey Georgetown University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Annual Review of Applied Linguistics publishes research on key topics in the broad field of applied linguistics. Each issue is thematic, providing a variety of perspectives on the topic through research summaries, critical overviews, position papers and empirical studies. Being responsive to the field, some issues are tied to the theme of that year's annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. Also, at regular intervals an issue will take the approach of covering applied linguistics as a field more broadly, including coverage of critical or controversial topics. ARAL provides cutting-edge and timely articles on a wide number of areas, including language learning and pedagogy, second language acquisition, sociolinguistics, language policy and planning, language assessment, and research design and methodology, to name just a few.

The role of race in Applied Linguistics

AAAL is pleased to present the recording of a webinar in collaboration with the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics in which we highlight 3 articles from the latest volume that consider race, racial justice and Indigenous language revitalization in Applied Linguistics.

Links to the 3 articles from the 2020 volume of ARAL can be found below:

African Americans in World Language Study: The Forged Path and Future Directions
Uju Anya

Indigenous Language Revitalization and Applied Linguistics: Parallel Histories, Shared Futures?
Onowa McIvor

Is an Antiracist and Decolonizing Applied Linguistics Possible?
Suhanthie Motha

Other applied linguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize
  • 04 May 2021, Jen Malat
  • The Journal of the International Phonetic Association is delighted to announce the winner of the inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize, as voted Congratulations to all the authors of Kalasha (Bumburet variety)! Congratulations also to the authors of the other shortlisted Illustrations: Ambel Kejom (Babanki) Zhushan Mandarin These Illustrations represent languages spoken in Pakistan, Indonesia (West Papua), Cameroon . . . → Read More: Inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize...
  • Cambridge at AAAL 2021
  • 19 March 2021, Jen Malat
  • We’re sorry that we won’t be able to meet in person at the AAAL conference this year and invite you to visit our virtual exhibit table, including a discount Plus, AAAL delegates can join our editor Rebecca Taylor at the panel session on 23 March at 11am talking all things publishing in applied linguistics!   What’s new in applied linguistics from Cambridge? Journals Cambridge is working to open up the scholarship published in our journals. If there’s an agreement in place between CUP and your university, you may be able to publish in our applied linguistics journals Open Access and free . . . → Read More: Cambridge at AAAL 2021...
  • An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!
  • 18 December 2020, Dan Iredale
  • Written by James Stratton, author of A Diachronic Analysis of the Adjective Intensifier well from Early Modern English to Present Day English in the Canadian If you want to convince someone that the book you just read is worth reading, you can intensify your speech. Intensifiers are linguistic devices which allow speakers to impress, praise, persuade, and generally influence a listener’s understanding of a message. A sentence like “the book was so interesting” is clearly more convincing than just “the book was interesting”. However, specific intensifiers can go stale over time if they are overused, which means that different intensifiers are favored at different points in time. In Present Day English, the three most frequently used intensifiers are so, really, and very, . . . → Read More: An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!...