Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-gcfkn Total loading time: 0.228 Render date: 2021-09-20T03:19:45.468Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

A computational study of creativity in design: The role of society

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2005

RICARDO SOSA
Affiliation:
Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
JOHN S. GERO
Affiliation:
Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

Studies of creativity have tended to focus on isolated individuals, under the assumption that it can be defined as a characteristic of an extraordinary person, product, or process. Existing computational models of creative behavior have inherited this emphasis on independent generative processes. However, an increasing multidisciplinary consensus regards creativity as a systems property, and extends the focus of inquiry to include the interaction between generative individuals and evaluative social groups. To acknowledge the complementarity of evaluative processes by social groups, experts, and peers, this paper presents experimentation with a framework of design as a social activity. This model is used to inspect phenomena associated with creativity in the interaction between designers and their societies. In particular, this paper describes the strength of social ties as a mechanism of social organization, and explores its potential relation to creativity in a computational social simulation. These experiments illustrate ways in which the role of designers as change agents of their societies can be largely determined by how the evaluating group self-organizes over time. A key potential implication is that the isolated characteristics of designers may be insufficient to formulate conclusions about the nature and effects of their behavior. Instead, causality could be attributed to situational factors that define the relationship between designers and their evaluators.

Type
Research Article
Information
AI EDAM , Volume 19 , Issue 4 , November 2005 , pp. 229 - 244
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Alder, G. (2004). JGraph, open source Java Graph visualization. Accessed on-line September 2004 at http://www.jgraph.com
Amabile, T. & Hennessey, B.A. (1999). Consensual assessment. In Encyclopedia of Creativity (Runco, M.A. & Pritzer, S.R., Eds.), pp. 347360. San Diego, CA: Academic.
Asch, S.E. (1955). Opinions and social pressure. Scientific American 193(5), 3135.Google Scholar
Barabasi, A.L., Ravasz, E., & Vicsek, T. (2001). Deterministic scale-free networks. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications 299(3–4), 559564.Google Scholar
Boden, M. (1999). Computer models of creativity. In Handbook of Creativity (Sternberg, R., Ed.), pp. 351372. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Boden, M.A. (1994). Dimensions of Creativity. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Boyd, R. & Richerson, P.J. (1995). Why does culture increase human adaptability? Ethology and Sociobiology 16(2), 125143.Google Scholar
Castelfranchi, C. (2001). The theory of social functions: Challenges for computational social science and multi-agent learning. Cognitive Systems Research 2(1), 538.Google Scholar
Collier, N. (2004). Repast: An agent based modelling toolkit for Java. Accessed on-line August 2004 at http://repast.sourceforge.net
Dorfman, R. (1979). Formula for Gini coefficient. Review of Economics Statistics 61(2), 146149.Google Scholar
Feldman, D.H., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Gardner, H. (1994). Changing the World: A Framework for the Study of Creativity. Westport, CT: Praeger.
Freeman, L.C. (1998). Exploring social structure using dynamic three-dimensional color images. Social Networks 20(2), 109118.Google Scholar
Gabora, L. (1995). Memes and variations: A computational model of cultural evolution. In 1993 Lectures in Complex Systems (Nadel, N. & Stein, D.L., Eds.), pp. 471486. Reading, MA: Addison–Wesley.
Gardner, H. (1993). Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi. New York: Basic Books.
Gardner, H. (1994). The creators' patterns. In Changing the World, A Framework for the Study of Creativity (Feldman, D.H., Csikszentmihalyi, M. & Gardner, H., Eds.), pp. 6985. Westport, CT: Praeger.
Gero, J.S. (2000). Computational models of innovative and creative design processes, Technological Forecasting and Social Change 64(2–3), 183196.Google Scholar
Gilbert, G.N. & Troitzsch, K.G. (1999). Simulation for the Social Scientist. Buckingham: Open University Press.
Goel, V. (1994). A comparison of design and nondesign problem spaces. Artificial Intelligence in Engineering 9(1), 5372.Google Scholar
Granovetter, M. (1973). The strength of weak ties. American Journal of Sociology 78(6), 13601380.Google Scholar
Heck, P.S. & Ghosh, S. (2000). A study of synthetic creativity: behavior modeling and simulation. IEEE Intelligent Systems and their Applications 15(6), 5866.Google Scholar
Hoschek, W. (2002). The Colt 1.0.3 distribution: open source libraries for high performance scientific and technical computing in Java. Accessed on-line August 2002 at http://cern.ch/hoschek/colt
Howe, M.J.A., Davidson, J.W., & Sloboda, J.A. (1999). Innate traits: reality or myth? In The Nature–Nurture Debate, The Essential Readings (Ceci, S.J. & Williams, W.M., Eds.), pp. 258289. Malden: Blackwell.
Khan, A. (2004). JExcel: A Java library for reading/writing Excel. Accessed on-line August 2004 at http://jexcelapi.sourceforge.net
Marsden, P.V. & Campbell, K. (1984). Measuring tie strength. Social Forces 63(2), 482501.Google Scholar
Nattermann, P.M. (2000). Best practice does not equal best strategy. The McKinsey Quarterly 2000(2), 3845.Google Scholar
Purcell, A.T. & Gero, J.S. (1996). Design and other types of fixation. Design Studies 17(4), 363383.Google Scholar
Rogers, E.M. (1995). Diffusion of Innovations. New York: Free Press.
Ross, L. & Nisbett, R.E. (1991). The Person and the Situation: Perspectives of Social Psychology. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.
Rudowicz, E. (2003). Creativity and culture: a two way interaction. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 47(3), 273290.Google Scholar
Runco, M.A. & Pritzker, S. (1999). Encyclopedia of Creativity. San Diego, CA: Academic.
Simonton, K. (2000). Creativity. American Psychologist 55(1), 151172.Google Scholar
Sosa, R. & Gero, J.S. (2003). Social change: exploring design influence. In Multi-Agent-Based Simulation III (Hales, D., Edmonds, B., Norling, E., & Rouchier, J., Eds.), pp. 106110. Berlin: Springer.
Sternberg, R.J. (1999). Handbook of Creativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wasserman, S. & Faust, K. (1994). Social Network Analysis: Methods and Applications. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Wooldridge, M.J. (2000). Reasoning about Rational Agents. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
16
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A computational study of creativity in design: The role of society
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A computational study of creativity in design: The role of society
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A computational study of creativity in design: The role of society
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *