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Rotorcraft simulation modelling and validation for control law design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2016

B. J. Manimala
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
D. J. Walker
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
G. D. Padfield
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
M. Voskuijl
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
A. W. Gubbels
Affiliation:
Institute for Aerospace Research (IAR), National Research Council (NRC) Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Abstract

This paper describes the development and validation of a high fidelity simulation model of the Bell 412 helicopter for handling qualities and flight control investigations. The base-line model features a rigid, articulated blade-element formulation of the main rotor, with flap and lag degrees of freedom. The Bell 412 HP engine/governor dynamics are represented by a second-order system. Other key features of the base-line model include a finite-state dynamic inflow model and lag damper dynamics. The base-line model gives excellent agreement with flight-test data over the speed range 15-120kt for on-axis responses. Prediction of off-axis responses is less accurate. Several model enhancement options were introduced to obtain an improved off-axis response. It is shown that the pitch/roll off-axis responses in transient manoeuvres can be improved significantly by including wake geometry distortion effects in the Peters-He finite-state dynamic inflow model.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2007

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