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Parallel rotation for negating Coriolis force effect on heat transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2020

A. Sarja
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NCUSA
P. Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MSUSA
S.V. Ekkad
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NCUSA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Gas turbine blades feature multi-pass internal cooling channels, through which relatively colder air bled from the compressor is routed to cool internal walls. Under rotation, due to the influence of Coriolis force and centrifugal buoyancy, heat transfer at the trailing side enhances and that at the leading side reduces, for a radially outward flow. This non-uniform temperature distribution results in increased thermal stress, which is detrimental to blade life. In this study, a rotation configuration is presented which can negate the Coriolis force effect on heat and fluid flow, thereby maintaining uniform heat transfer on leading and trailing walls. A straight, smooth duct of unit aspect ratio is considered to demonstrate the concept and understand the fluid flow within the channel and its interaction with the walls. The new design is compared against the conventional rotation design. Numerical simulations under steady-state condition were carried out at a Reynolds number of 25000, where the Rotation numbers were varied as 0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25. Realisable version of k- $\varepsilon$ model was used for turbulence modelling. It was observed that new rotation (parallel) configuration’s heat transfer on leading and trailing sides were near similar, and trailing side was marginally higher compared to leading side. An interesting phenomenon of secondary Coriolis effect is reported which accounts for the minor differences in heat transfer augmentation between leading and trailing walls. Due to centrifugal buoyancy, the fluid is pushed towards the radially outward wall, resulting in a counter-rotating vortex pair, which also enhances the heat transfer on leading and trailing walls when compared to stationary case.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Royal Aeronautical Society 2020

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Footnotes

A version of this paper was presented at the 24th ISABE Conference in Canberra, Australia, September 2019.

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