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3 - Slavery without States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2014

Sean Stilwell
Affiliation:
University of Vermont
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Summary

Introduction

A Balanta man, Mam Nambtacha, described how Balanta communities dealt with the captives they acquired in the past, and focused on the way that children might eventually be incorporated after a long period of time living within a household:

People went to distant tabancas [villages] to conduct ostemoré [a raid]. They carried away cows and other goods.... Captives could also be taken. The families could pay something and in the end could gain the liberty of the captured people. If the families could not pay, the captives stayed in the houses of their captors. For example, in the tabanca of Cumbumba, there was once an old man called Mpas Na Uale who was said to be in the subgroup Mansoanca. He had been captured in ostemoré. Since his family did not have the courage to pay a ransom and retrieve him from the tabanca of Cumbumba, Mpas Na Uale stayed there until he died. At that point he was not Balanta Mansoanca but a Balanta Nhacra. The practice of ostemoré was one of the things that led to the mixing of the Balanta with other ethnic groups.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

References

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  • Slavery without States
  • Sean Stilwell, University of Vermont
  • Book: Slavery and Slaving in African History
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139034999.004
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  • Slavery without States
  • Sean Stilwell, University of Vermont
  • Book: Slavery and Slaving in African History
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139034999.004
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Slavery without States
  • Sean Stilwell, University of Vermont
  • Book: Slavery and Slaving in African History
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139034999.004
Available formats
×