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Contributors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2021

Janine Natalya Clark
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Michael Ungar
Affiliation:
Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia

Summary

Type
Chapter
Information
Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice
How Societies Recover after Collective Violence
, pp. x - xv
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021
  • sara beatriz alvarez medrano, Maya K’iche’, spiritual guide, social therapist, strives for the recovery and valuing of the Mayan cosmovision. She is the coordinator of the Women’s Rights Unit of the Centre for Legal Action in Human Rights (CALDH), one of Guatemala’s most important human rights non-governmental organisations (NGOs). For over two decades, together with other Mayan women, she has designed and facilitated training and healing processes to strengthen the leadership of Mayan women in their struggle to defend their human rights and achieve historical justice. Since 2000, she has been a political associate of the Kaqla Mayan Women’s Group, which works to heal historical, transgenerational traumas, including racialised and gendered violence, through participatory workshops that draw on diverse healing practices from the Mayan cosmovision, both ancestral and contemporary. She received an MA in Clinical Psychology and Mental Health from the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala in 2017.

  • devin g. atallah, phd, is Assistant Professor of Psychology, Racial/Cultural Focus, in the Psychology Department at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He engages decolonising narrative and community-based participatory approaches in his critical inquiry. As an activist, scholar, practitioner and healer, Dr Atallah focuses on understanding, amplifying and directly contributing to intergenerational resilience, resistance, healing, justice and decolonisation/decoloniality. He aims to honour and anchor his work in local and/or Indigenous knowledges of communities in struggle and contesting racism and settler colonialism, primarily through his long-term partnerships with communities in Palestine, communities of colour in Boston and Mapuche people in Chile.

  • jennie e. burnet, phd, is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Georgia State University. Her research explores the social, cultural and psychological aspects of war, genocide and mass violence, and the micro-level impact of large-scale social change in the context of conflict. Dr Burnet has been studying Rwanda, the 1994 genocide of Tutsis and its aftermath, and women in politics for more than twenty years. Her research has appeared in Politics & Gender, African Affairs, African Studies Review and the Women’s Studies International Forum. Dr Burnet’s award-winning book, Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory and Silence in Rwanda, was published in 2012 by the University of Wisconsin Press. She is currently writing a book, To Save Heaven and Earth: Rescue during the Rwandan Genocide, which examines how and why some Rwandans risked their lives to save Tutsi and others targeted in the genocide.

  • janine natalya clark, phd, is Professor of Gender, Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law at the University of Birmingham. She has particular interests in conflict-related sexual violence, transitional justice, resilience and post-conflict reconciliation. She has been conducting research in Bosnia-Herzegovina for more than ten years. Her current research – a comparative study of resilience focused on victims/survivors of conflict-related sexual violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Colombia and Uganda – is being funded by the European Research Council through a five-year Consolidator Grant (2017–2022). Professor Clark has three research monographs and her interdisciplinary work has been published in a wide variety of journals, including the International Journal of Transitional Justice, the Journal of International Criminal Justice, Theoretical Criminology, Sociology, Memory Studies and International Studies Review.

  • alison crosby, phd, is Associate Professor in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies at York University in Toronto. She was director of the Centre for Feminist Research at York from 2014 to 2019. Her research projects and publications use an anti-racist, transnational feminist lens and participatory methodologies to explore protagonists’ multifaceted struggles to redress and memorialise harm in the aftermath of racialised gendered violence, with a particular focus on Guatemala. She is the author, with M. Brinton Lykes, of Beyond Repair? Mayan Women’s Protagonism in the Aftermath of Genocidal Harm (Rutgers University Press, 2019), published in Spanish as Más Allá de la Reparación: Protagonismo de Mujeres Mayas en las Secuelas del Daño Genocida (Cholsamaj, 2019). She currently directs the project Remembering and Memorializing Violence: Transnational Feminist Dialogues, https://memorializingviolence.com/, which is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

  • cedric de coning, phd, is Research Professor with the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) and Senior Advisor for the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD). His research covers African, Global South and United Nations peace and security issues. He holds a PhD in Applied Ethics from the Department of Philosophy at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has a special interest in the application of complexity theory to Peace and Conflict Studies, and in this context he has introduced Adaptive Peacebuilding as a new analytical, normative and operational approach to guide international interventions. He has served in a number of advisory capacities for the African Union and United Nations (UN), including the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board for the Peacebuilding Fund. He tweets at @CedricdeConing.

  • wendy lambourne, phd, is Chair of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney. Her interdisciplinary research on trauma healing, transitional justice, reconciliation and peacebuilding after genocide and other mass violence has a regional focus on sub-Saharan Africa and the Asia/Pacific. The results of her field research, conducted over the past twenty-three years in Rwanda, Burundi, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Timor Leste, have been published extensively. They include articles in Human Rights Review, the Journal of Peacebuilding and Development and the International Journal of Transitional Justice, and book chapters in Knowledge for Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice: Epistemic Communities and the Politics of Knowledge (Edward Elgar, 2021), The Palgrave Handbook of Ethnicity (Springer Nature, 2019), Advocating Transitional Justice in Africa: The Role of Civil Society (Springer, 2018), Restorative Justice in Transitional Settings (Routledge, 2016) and Breaking Intergenerational Cycles of Repetition: A Global Dialogue on Historical Trauma and Memory (Barbara Budrich, 2016).

  • m. brinton lykes, phd, is Professor of Community-Cultural Psychology and Co-Director of the Centre for Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College. Her anti-racist feminist activist scholarship focuses on (1) rethreading life in the wake of racialised and gendered violence during armed conflict and in post-genocide transitions, and (2) migration and post-deportation human rights violations and resistance. She has published extensively in refereed journals and edited volumes; she has co-edited four books and co-authored four others, and is also co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Transitional Justice. She is the recipient of the Ignacio Martín-Baró Lifetime Peace Practitioner Award, the American Psychological Association’s International Humanitarian Award, the Florence L. Denmark and Mary E. Reuder Award for Outstanding International Contributions to the Psychology of Women and Gender and the Seymour B. Sarason Award for Community Research and Action. She is a board member on several NGOs, including Women’s Rights International, Impunity Watch and Grassroots International.

  • hana r. masud, phd, is a postdoctoral research fellow in Dr Atallah’s Research Team at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Dr Masud is also currently chair of Decolonial Racial Justice in Praxis, an initiative of Psychologists for Social Responsibility. Dr Masud received her doctorate in Community Psychology from the National Louis University in Chicago. Her research focuses on the coloniality of mental health services and its impact on re-colonising local resistance. In her work, she aims to build collaborative partnerships with mental health workers and marginalised communities in shared efforts to transform conditions of inequity towards wellness and justice in Palestine.

  • nayanika mookherjee, phd, is Professor of Political Anthropology at Durham University. Her research involves ethnographic exploration of public memories of violent pasts and aesthetic practices of reparative futures. Based on her award-winning book The Spectral Wound: Sexual Violence, Public Memories and the Bangladesh War of 1971, in 2019 she co-authored (with visual artist Najmunnahar Keya) a survivor-led guideline, graphic novel and animation film Birangona and Ethical Testimonies of Sexual Violence during Conflict. This received the 2019 Praxis Award from the Association of Professional Anthropologists. Professor Mookherjee has had fellowships with the Economic and Social Research Council, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Rockefeller Foundation at Bellagio. She has published extensively and her work has appeared in a variety of journals, including the Journal of Royal Anthropological Institute, the Journal of Historical Sociology and the Journal of Material Culture. She is working on a manuscript entitled Arts of Irreconciliation and continuing research on transnational adoption.

  • fred ngomokwe works with the Refugee Law Project (RLP) at the School of Law at Makerere University in Uganda as a transitional justice practitioner and office coordinator of the organisation’s Gulu office. For the past decade he has worked closely with victims and survivors of the war in northern Uganda. He is also the focal point person for human rights defenders in Acholiland, northern Uganda.

  • philipp schulz, phd, is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Intercultural and International Studies (InIIS) at the University of Bremen. His work focuses on gender and sexualities in (post-)conflict settings, with a particular focus on wartime sexual violence. His book Male Survivors of Wartime Sexual Violence: Perspectives from Northern Uganda (2021) is published with the University of California Press, and his research has appeared in International Affairs, the International Feminist Journal of Politics and Security Dialogue.

  • michael ungar, phd, is the Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Child, Family and Community Resilience at Dalhousie University, where he founded and directs the Resilience Research Centre. He has designed multi-site longitudinal research and evaluation projects in collaboration with organisations including the Human Development and Education Branch of the World Bank, NATO, the Red Cross and national public health agencies. With more than $10,000,000 in funded research, Professor Ungar’s research projects span more than a dozen low-, middle- and high-income countries, with many focused on the resilience of marginalised youth and their communities. He is one of the most well-known scholars on human resilience in the world and has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the topic. He is the author of sixteen books for mental health professionals, researchers and lay audiences.

  • sanne weber, phd, is a Leverhulme research fellow in the International Development Department at the University of Birmingham. Her research explores how conflict affects gender relations. She uses ethnographic, participatory and creative research methods to understand whether and how transitional justice mechanisms are capable of transforming gendered and other structural inequalities. She has worked primarily in Latin America, particularly in Colombia and Guatemala. Her current project examines the gendered and socio-economic dynamics of the reintegration of ex-combatants. In the past, she has worked as a researcher and team coordinator on gender programmes for human rights and development organisations in Guatemala. She has published in journals such as the International Journal of Transitional Justice, the Journal of Refugee Studiesand the International Feminist Journal of Politics.

  • timothy williams, phd, is a junior professor of insecurity and social order at the Bundeswehr University Munich. He was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Conflict Studies at the University of Marburg, where he also completed his PhD. His research deals with violence, focusing on its dynamics, particularly at the micro level, as well as its consequences for post-conflict societies and the politics of memory. He has conducted extensive field research in Cambodia, as well as in Armenia and Rwanda, and he was awarded the Emerging Scholar Prize of the International Association of Genocide Scholars in 2017. Timothy is the co-editor of a volume on perpetrators (with Susanne Buckley-Zistel, Routledge, 2018) and the author of The Complexity of Evil: Perpetration and Genocide(Rutgers University Press, 2020).

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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Janine Natalya Clark, University of Birmingham, Michael Ungar, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
  • Book: Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice
  • Online publication: 24 September 2021
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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Janine Natalya Clark, University of Birmingham, Michael Ungar, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
  • Book: Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice
  • Online publication: 24 September 2021
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

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  • Contributors
  • Edited by Janine Natalya Clark, University of Birmingham, Michael Ungar, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
  • Book: Resilience, Adaptive Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice
  • Online publication: 24 September 2021
Available formats
×