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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2016

Jon Mee
Affiliation:
University of York
Type
Chapter
Information
Print, Publicity, and Popular Radicalism in the 1790s
The Laurel of Liberty
, pp. 236 - 260
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NC
This content is Open Access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence CC-BY-NC 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/cclicenses/

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