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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 December 2021

Sarah Neville
Affiliation:
Ohio State University

Summary

Type
Chapter
Information
Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade
English Stationers and the Commodification of Botany
, pp. 263 - 282
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

References

Primary Sources

Books are ordered by date of publication as established by the STC except where noted.Google Scholar
1525. Here begynnyth a newe mater / the whiche sheweth and treateth of [the] vertues & proprytes of herbes / the whiche is called an Herball (London: Richard Bankes). STC 13175.1Google Scholar
1526. Here begynneth a newe marer / [the] whiche sheweth and treateth of the vertues & propertes of herbes / the whiche is callyd an Herball (London: Richard Bankes). STC 13175.2Google Scholar
1526. The grete herball whiche geueth parfyt knowlege and vnderstandyng of all maner of herbes & there gracyous vertues whiche god hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and helth/for they hele & cure all maner of dyseases and sekenesses that fall or mysfortune to all maner of creatoures of god created/practysed by many expert and wyse maysters/as Auicenna & other. &c. Also it geueth full parfyte vnderstandynge of the booke lately prentyd by me (Peter treueris) named the noble experiens of the vertuous handwarke of surgery (London: Peter Treveris). STC 13176Google Scholar
1529. The grete herball whiche gyueth parfyt knowledge and vnderstanding of all maner of herbes & there gracyous vertues whiche god hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and helth, for they hele & cure all maner of dyseases and sekenesses that fall or mysfortune to all maner of creatures of god created practysed by many expert and wyse maysters, as Auicenna & other. &c. Also it gyueth full parfyte vnderstandynge of the booke lately prentyd by me (Peter treueris) named the noble experie[n]ce of the vertuous handwarke of surgery. (London: Peter Treveris and Lawrence Andrewe). STC 13177/STC 13177.5Google Scholar
1537[c.?]. A Boke of the propertyes of herbes the which is called an Herball. (London: John Skot). STC 13175.4Google Scholar
1539[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal. (London: Robert Redman). STC 13175.5Google Scholar
1539. The great herball newly corrected. The contentes of this boke. A table after the latyn names of all herbes, a table after the Englysshe names of all herbes. The propertees and qualytes of all thynges in this booke. The descrypcyon of vrynes, how a man shall haue trewe knoweledge of all sekenesses. An exposycyon of the wordes obscure and not well knowen. A table, quyckly to fynde remedyes for all dyseases, God saue the Kynge (London: Thomas Gibson). STC 13178Google Scholar
1541. Hereafter foloweth the knowledge, properties, and the vertues of Herbes. (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.6 (Note: See Tracy, Robert Wyer.)Google Scholar
1541. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Harbal (London: Thomas Petyt). STC 13175.8Google Scholar
1541[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal (London: Elizabeth Pickering Redman). STC 13175.7Google Scholar
1544. A newe Herball of Macer. Translated out of Laten in to Englysshe (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.8c (Note: See Tracy, Robert Wyer.)Google Scholar
1545[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the which is called an herball (London: Robert Copland). STC 13175.11 (Note: Conjectured date supplied by Blayney, Stationers’ Company, 1,046.)Google Scholar
1546. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal (London: William Middleton). STC 13175.10Google Scholar
1548[?]. A boke of the propertes of herbes the which is called an herball (London: John Rastell for John Walley). STC 13175.12 (Note: See Blayney, Stationers’ Company, 1,046.)Google Scholar
1550. A lytel herball of the properties of herbes newely amended and corrected, with certayne addicions at the end of the boke [as] appointed in the almanacke, made in M.D.L. the xii. day of February by A. Askham (London: William Powell). STC 13175.13Google Scholar
1552[c.]. Macers herbal. Practysyd by doctor Lynacro. Translated out of laten, in to Englysshe, whiche shewynge theyr Operacyons & Vertues, set in the margent of this Boke, to the entent you might know theyr Vertues (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.13cGoogle Scholar
1552[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herball, wherunto is added the time [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shold be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the] Herbes when they are stilled. Also a generall rule of all maner of Herbes drawen out of an auncyent booke of Phisyck by W.C. (London: William Copland for John Wight/Richard Kele). STC 13175.15/STC 13175.15AGoogle Scholar
1555[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herball, whereunto is added the time [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shold be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the] Herbes when they are stilled. Also a general rule of al maner of Herbes drawen out of an auncient boke of Phisyck by W.C. (London: John King for John Walley/Antony Veale). STC 13175.16/STC 13175.17Google Scholar
1559[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herbal, whereunto is added the tyme [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shoulde be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the]Herbes whe[n] they are stylled. Also a generall rule of al manner of Herbes drawen out of an auncient boke of Physycke by W.C. (London: William Copland). STC 13176.18Google Scholar
1561. A little Herball of the properties of Herbes, newly amended & corrected, wyth certayn Additions at the ende of the boke, declaring what Herbes hath influence of certain Sterres and constellations, wherby maye be chosen the best and most lucky tymes and days of their ministraction, according to the Moone being in the signes of heaue[n] the which is daily appoi[n]ted in the Almanacke, made and gathered in the yeare of our Lorde God, M.D.L. the .xxi. daye of February, by Anthony Askha[m], Physycyon (London: John King). STC 13175.19Google Scholar
1561. The greate Herball, which geueth parfyte knowledge & understanding of al maner of herbes, and theyr gracious vertues, whiche GOD hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and health, for they heale and cure all maner of disases and sekenesses, that fall or misfortune too all maner of creatures of GOD created, practysed by many expert and wyse maysters, as Auicenna, Pandecta, and more other, &c. Newlye corrected and diligently ouersene. In the yeare of our Lord God. M. CCCCC.LXI (London: John King). STC 13179Google Scholar
1567[c]. A booke of the properties of herbes, called an herbal. Whereunto is added the tyme that herbes, floures and seedes should bee gathered to bee kept the whole yeare, wyth the virtue of the herbes when they are stylled. Also a generall rule of all maner of herbes, drawen out of an auncient booke of physycke by W.C. (London: John Awdely for Anthony Kitson). STC 13175.19cGoogle Scholar
1538. Turner, William. Libellus de re Herbaria novus in quo Herbarum aliquot nomina greca, latina & anglica habes, vna cum nominibus officinarum (London: John Byddell). STC 24358Google Scholar
1548. Turner, William. The Names of Herbes in Greke, Latin, Englishe Duche & Frenche. Gathered by William Turner (London: Steven Mierdman for John Day and William Seres). STC 24359Google Scholar
1551. Turner, William. A New Herball, wherein are conteyned the names of Herbes in Greke, Latin, Englysh, Duch Frenche, and in the Potecaries and Herbaries Latin, with the properties degrees and natural places of the same, gathered and made by Wylliam Turner, Physicion vnto the Duke of Somersettes Grace (London: Steven Mierdman). STC 24365Google Scholar
1562. Turner, William. The seconde part of Vuilliam Turners herball wherein are conteyned the names of herbes in Greke, Latin, Duche, Frenche, and in the apothecaries Latin, and somtyme in Italiane, wyth the vertues of the same herbes wyth diuerse confutationes of no small errours, that men of no small learning haue committed in the intreatinge of herbes of late yeares. Here vnto is ioyned also a booke of the bath of Baeth in Englande, and of the vertues of the same wyth diuerse other bathes moste holsum and effectuall, both in Almany and Englande, set furth by William Turner Doctor of Physik (Cologne: Arnold Birckman). STC 24366Google Scholar
1568. Turner, William. The first and seconde partes of the Herbal of William Turner Doctor in Phisick lately ouersene/ corrected and enlarged with the Thirde parte/ lately gathered/and nowe set oute with the names of the herbes/in Greke Latin/English/Duche/Frenche/ and in the Apothecaries and Herbaries Latin/with the properties/degrees/and natural places of the same. Here vnto is ionned also a Booke of the bath of Baeth in England/. and of the vertues of the same with diuerse other bathes/ moste holsom and effectuall/both in Almaye and England/set furth by William Turner Doctor in Phsick (Cologne: Heirs of Arnold Birckman). STC 24367Google Scholar
1570–1571. Pena, Pierre and L’Obel, Matthias de. Stirpium aduerseria noua, perfacilis vestigatio (London: Thomas Purfoot). STC 19595 (Note: STC 19595.3, STC 19595.5, and STC 19595.7 are reissues of the 1st ed.)Google Scholar
1578. Dodoens, Rembert. A Niewe Herball, or Historie of Plantes: Wherin is contayned the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundry kindes: their straunge Figures, Fashions, and Shapes: their Names / Natures / Operations, and Vertues: and that not onely of those whiche are here growyng in this our Countrie of Englande/ but of all others also of forrayne Realmes /commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Doutche or Almaigne tongue, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Physition to the Emperour: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier (London [Antwerp]: Printed by Hendrik van der Loe for Garrat Dewes). STC 6984Google Scholar
1586. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herball, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie kindes: their Names, Natures, Operations, & Vertues: and that not only of those which are heere growing in this our Countrie of England, but of all others also of foraine Realms commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Douch or Almaigne toong, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Phisition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier (London: Ninian Newton). STC 6985Google Scholar
1595. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herball, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie kindes: their Names, Natures, Operations, & Vertues: and that not only of those which are heer growing in this our Countrie of England, but of al others also of foraine Realms commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Dutch or Almaigne toong, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Phisition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier. Corrected and amended (London: Edmund Bollifant). STC 6986Google Scholar
1597. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie (London: Edmund Bollifant for Bonham and John Norton). STC 11750CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1606. Ram, William. Rams Little Dodeon (London: Simon Stafford). STC 6988Google Scholar
1619. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herbal, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie Kindes, their Names, Natures, Operations, and Vertues: and that not onely of those which are here growing in this our Country of Engalnd [sic], but of all others also of forraine Realmes commonly vsed in Physicke. First set forth in the Dutch or Almaigne tongue, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Physition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier. Corrected and amended (London: Edward Griffin). STC 6987Google Scholar
1629. Parkinson, John. Paradisi in sole paradisus terrestris. Or A Garden of all sorts of pleasant flowers which our English ayre will permit to be noursed vp: with A Kitchen garden of all manner of herbes, rootes, & fruites, for meate or sause vsed with vs, and An an Orchard of all sorte of fruit-bearing Trees and shrubbes fit for our Land together With the right ordering planting & preseruing of them and their vses & vertues (London: Humphrey Lownes and Robert Young). STC 19300Google Scholar
1633. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie Very much Enlarged and Amended by Thomas Johnson Citizen and Apothecarye of London (London: Adam Islip for Joyce Norton and Richard Whitaker). STC 11751Google Scholar
1636. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie Very much Enlarged and Amended by Thomas Johnson Citizen and Apothecarye of London (London: Adam Islip for Joyce Norton and Richard Whitaker). STC 11752Google Scholar
1640. Parkinson, John. Theatrum Botanicum. The Theater of Plantes. Or, An Universall and Compleate Herball (London: Thomas Cotes). STC 19302Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

1525. Here begynnyth a newe mater / the whiche sheweth and treateth of [the] vertues & proprytes of herbes / the whiche is called an Herball (London: Richard Bankes). STC 13175.1Google Scholar
1526. Here begynneth a newe marer / [the] whiche sheweth and treateth of the vertues & propertes of herbes / the whiche is callyd an Herball (London: Richard Bankes). STC 13175.2Google Scholar
1526. The grete herball whiche geueth parfyt knowlege and vnderstandyng of all maner of herbes & there gracyous vertues whiche god hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and helth/for they hele & cure all maner of dyseases and sekenesses that fall or mysfortune to all maner of creatoures of god created/practysed by many expert and wyse maysters/as Auicenna & other. &c. Also it geueth full parfyte vnderstandynge of the booke lately prentyd by me (Peter treueris) named the noble experiens of the vertuous handwarke of surgery (London: Peter Treveris). STC 13176Google Scholar
1529. The grete herball whiche gyueth parfyt knowledge and vnderstanding of all maner of herbes & there gracyous vertues whiche god hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and helth, for they hele & cure all maner of dyseases and sekenesses that fall or mysfortune to all maner of creatures of god created practysed by many expert and wyse maysters, as Auicenna & other. &c. Also it gyueth full parfyte vnderstandynge of the booke lately prentyd by me (Peter treueris) named the noble experie[n]ce of the vertuous handwarke of surgery. (London: Peter Treveris and Lawrence Andrewe). STC 13177/STC 13177.5Google Scholar
1537[c.?]. A Boke of the propertyes of herbes the which is called an Herball. (London: John Skot). STC 13175.4Google Scholar
1539[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal. (London: Robert Redman). STC 13175.5Google Scholar
1539. The great herball newly corrected. The contentes of this boke. A table after the latyn names of all herbes, a table after the Englysshe names of all herbes. The propertees and qualytes of all thynges in this booke. The descrypcyon of vrynes, how a man shall haue trewe knoweledge of all sekenesses. An exposycyon of the wordes obscure and not well knowen. A table, quyckly to fynde remedyes for all dyseases, God saue the Kynge (London: Thomas Gibson). STC 13178Google Scholar
1541. Hereafter foloweth the knowledge, properties, and the vertues of Herbes. (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.6 (Note: See Tracy, Robert Wyer.)Google Scholar
1541. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Harbal (London: Thomas Petyt). STC 13175.8Google Scholar
1541[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal (London: Elizabeth Pickering Redman). STC 13175.7Google Scholar
1544. A newe Herball of Macer. Translated out of Laten in to Englysshe (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.8c (Note: See Tracy, Robert Wyer.)Google Scholar
1545[?]. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the which is called an herball (London: Robert Copland). STC 13175.11 (Note: Conjectured date supplied by Blayney, Stationers’ Company, 1,046.)Google Scholar
1546. A boke of the propertyes of herbes the whiche is called an Herbal (London: William Middleton). STC 13175.10Google Scholar
1548[?]. A boke of the propertes of herbes the which is called an herball (London: John Rastell for John Walley). STC 13175.12 (Note: See Blayney, Stationers’ Company, 1,046.)Google Scholar
1550. A lytel herball of the properties of herbes newely amended and corrected, with certayne addicions at the end of the boke [as] appointed in the almanacke, made in M.D.L. the xii. day of February by A. Askham (London: William Powell). STC 13175.13Google Scholar
1552[c.]. Macers herbal. Practysyd by doctor Lynacro. Translated out of laten, in to Englysshe, whiche shewynge theyr Operacyons & Vertues, set in the margent of this Boke, to the entent you might know theyr Vertues (London: Robert Wyer). STC 13175.13cGoogle Scholar
1552[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herball, wherunto is added the time [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shold be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the] Herbes when they are stilled. Also a generall rule of all maner of Herbes drawen out of an auncyent booke of Phisyck by W.C. (London: William Copland for John Wight/Richard Kele). STC 13175.15/STC 13175.15AGoogle Scholar
1555[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herball, whereunto is added the time [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shold be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the] Herbes when they are stilled. Also a general rule of al maner of Herbes drawen out of an auncient boke of Phisyck by W.C. (London: John King for John Walley/Antony Veale). STC 13175.16/STC 13175.17Google Scholar
1559[?]. A boke of the propreties of Herbes called an herbal, whereunto is added the tyme [the] herbes, floures and Sedes shoulde be gathered to be kept the whole yere, with the virtue of [the]Herbes whe[n] they are stylled. Also a generall rule of al manner of Herbes drawen out of an auncient boke of Physycke by W.C. (London: William Copland). STC 13176.18Google Scholar
1561. A little Herball of the properties of Herbes, newly amended & corrected, wyth certayn Additions at the ende of the boke, declaring what Herbes hath influence of certain Sterres and constellations, wherby maye be chosen the best and most lucky tymes and days of their ministraction, according to the Moone being in the signes of heaue[n] the which is daily appoi[n]ted in the Almanacke, made and gathered in the yeare of our Lorde God, M.D.L. the .xxi. daye of February, by Anthony Askha[m], Physycyon (London: John King). STC 13175.19Google Scholar
1561. The greate Herball, which geueth parfyte knowledge & understanding of al maner of herbes, and theyr gracious vertues, whiche GOD hath ordeyned for our prosperous welfare and health, for they heale and cure all maner of disases and sekenesses, that fall or misfortune too all maner of creatures of GOD created, practysed by many expert and wyse maysters, as Auicenna, Pandecta, and more other, &c. Newlye corrected and diligently ouersene. In the yeare of our Lord God. M. CCCCC.LXI (London: John King). STC 13179Google Scholar
1567[c]. A booke of the properties of herbes, called an herbal. Whereunto is added the tyme that herbes, floures and seedes should bee gathered to bee kept the whole yeare, wyth the virtue of the herbes when they are stylled. Also a generall rule of all maner of herbes, drawen out of an auncient booke of physycke by W.C. (London: John Awdely for Anthony Kitson). STC 13175.19cGoogle Scholar
1538. Turner, William. Libellus de re Herbaria novus in quo Herbarum aliquot nomina greca, latina & anglica habes, vna cum nominibus officinarum (London: John Byddell). STC 24358Google Scholar
1548. Turner, William. The Names of Herbes in Greke, Latin, Englishe Duche & Frenche. Gathered by William Turner (London: Steven Mierdman for John Day and William Seres). STC 24359Google Scholar
1551. Turner, William. A New Herball, wherein are conteyned the names of Herbes in Greke, Latin, Englysh, Duch Frenche, and in the Potecaries and Herbaries Latin, with the properties degrees and natural places of the same, gathered and made by Wylliam Turner, Physicion vnto the Duke of Somersettes Grace (London: Steven Mierdman). STC 24365Google Scholar
1562. Turner, William. The seconde part of Vuilliam Turners herball wherein are conteyned the names of herbes in Greke, Latin, Duche, Frenche, and in the apothecaries Latin, and somtyme in Italiane, wyth the vertues of the same herbes wyth diuerse confutationes of no small errours, that men of no small learning haue committed in the intreatinge of herbes of late yeares. Here vnto is ioyned also a booke of the bath of Baeth in Englande, and of the vertues of the same wyth diuerse other bathes moste holsum and effectuall, both in Almany and Englande, set furth by William Turner Doctor of Physik (Cologne: Arnold Birckman). STC 24366Google Scholar
1568. Turner, William. The first and seconde partes of the Herbal of William Turner Doctor in Phisick lately ouersene/ corrected and enlarged with the Thirde parte/ lately gathered/and nowe set oute with the names of the herbes/in Greke Latin/English/Duche/Frenche/ and in the Apothecaries and Herbaries Latin/with the properties/degrees/and natural places of the same. Here vnto is ionned also a Booke of the bath of Baeth in England/. and of the vertues of the same with diuerse other bathes/ moste holsom and effectuall/both in Almaye and England/set furth by William Turner Doctor in Phsick (Cologne: Heirs of Arnold Birckman). STC 24367Google Scholar
1570–1571. Pena, Pierre and L’Obel, Matthias de. Stirpium aduerseria noua, perfacilis vestigatio (London: Thomas Purfoot). STC 19595 (Note: STC 19595.3, STC 19595.5, and STC 19595.7 are reissues of the 1st ed.)Google Scholar
1578. Dodoens, Rembert. A Niewe Herball, or Historie of Plantes: Wherin is contayned the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundry kindes: their straunge Figures, Fashions, and Shapes: their Names / Natures / Operations, and Vertues: and that not onely of those whiche are here growyng in this our Countrie of Englande/ but of all others also of forrayne Realmes /commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Doutche or Almaigne tongue, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Physition to the Emperour: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier (London [Antwerp]: Printed by Hendrik van der Loe for Garrat Dewes). STC 6984Google Scholar
1586. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herball, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie kindes: their Names, Natures, Operations, & Vertues: and that not only of those which are heere growing in this our Countrie of England, but of all others also of foraine Realms commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Douch or Almaigne toong, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Phisition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier (London: Ninian Newton). STC 6985Google Scholar
1595. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herball, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie kindes: their Names, Natures, Operations, & Vertues: and that not only of those which are heer growing in this our Countrie of England, but of al others also of foraine Realms commonly vsed in Physicke. First set foorth in the Dutch or Almaigne toong, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Phisition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier. Corrected and amended (London: Edmund Bollifant). STC 6986Google Scholar
1597. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie (London: Edmund Bollifant for Bonham and John Norton). STC 11750CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1606. Ram, William. Rams Little Dodeon (London: Simon Stafford). STC 6988Google Scholar
1619. Dodoens, Rembert. A New Herbal, or Historie of Plants: Wherin is contained the whole discourse and perfect description of all sorts of Herbes and Plants: their diuers and sundrie Kindes, their Names, Natures, Operations, and Vertues: and that not onely of those which are here growing in this our Country of Engalnd [sic], but of all others also of forraine Realmes commonly vsed in Physicke. First set forth in the Dutch or Almaigne tongue, by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Physition to the Emperor: And now first translated out of French into English, by Henrie Lyte Esquier. Corrected and amended (London: Edward Griffin). STC 6987Google Scholar
1629. Parkinson, John. Paradisi in sole paradisus terrestris. Or A Garden of all sorts of pleasant flowers which our English ayre will permit to be noursed vp: with A Kitchen garden of all manner of herbes, rootes, & fruites, for meate or sause vsed with vs, and An an Orchard of all sorte of fruit-bearing Trees and shrubbes fit for our Land together With the right ordering planting & preseruing of them and their vses & vertues (London: Humphrey Lownes and Robert Young). STC 19300Google Scholar
1633. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie Very much Enlarged and Amended by Thomas Johnson Citizen and Apothecarye of London (London: Adam Islip for Joyce Norton and Richard Whitaker). STC 11751Google Scholar
1636. Gerard, John. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. Gathered by John Gerarde of London Master in Chirvrgerie Very much Enlarged and Amended by Thomas Johnson Citizen and Apothecarye of London (London: Adam Islip for Joyce Norton and Richard Whitaker). STC 11752Google Scholar
1640. Parkinson, John. Theatrum Botanicum. The Theater of Plantes. Or, An Universall and Compleate Herball (London: Thomas Cotes). STC 19302Google Scholar
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