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Conversation Analysis
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Book description

'Conversation analysis' is an approach to the study of social interaction that focuses on practices of speaking that recur across a range of contexts and settings. The early studies in this tradition were based on the analysis of English conversation. More recently, however, conversation analysts have begun to study talk in a broader range of communities around the world. Through detailed analyses of recorded conversations, this book examines differences and similarities across a wide range of languages including Finnish, Japanese, Tzeltal Mayan, Russian and Mandarin. Bringing together interrelated methodological and analytic contributions, it explores topics such as the role of gaze in question-and-answer sequences, the organization of repair, and the design of responses to assessments. The emerging comparative perspective demonstrates how the structure of talk is inflected by the local circumstances within which it operates.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:‘Hooray! This is what we’ve been waiting for - a genuinely cross-linguistic perspective on the ways in which semiotic resources, including language and the body, are mobilized for the resolution of recurrent tasks in interaction.’

Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen - University of Potsdam

Review of the hardback:‘Not only does this remarkable book represent a major collection of cross-linguistic work in Conversation Analysis, but the contributions, all by world-renowned scholars, covering ten languages, together form a stunning and important picture of the ways in which the resources of any particular language afford possibilities for social action accomplished through talk.’

Sandra Thompson - University of California, Santa Barbara

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Contents

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