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The Cambridge Handbook of Judicial Control of Arbitral Awards
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Book description

A unique collaboration between academic scholars, legal practitioners, and arbitrators, this handbook focuses on the intersection of arbitration - as an alternative to litigation - and the court systems to which arbitration is ultimately beholden. The first three parts analyze issues relating to the interpretation of the scope of arbitration agreements, arbitrator bias and conflicts of interest, arbitrator misconduct during the proceedings, enforceability of arbitral awards, and the grounds for vacating awards. The next section features fifteen country-specific reviews, which demonstrate that, despite the commonality of principles at the international level, there is a significant of amount of differences in the application of those principles at the national level. This work should be read by anyone interested in the general rules and principles of the enforceability of foreign arbitral awards and the grounds for courts to vacate or annul such awards.

Reviews

'The most valuable feature of this excellent work is that it will be a very efficient and reliable source of information for lawyers coming from jurisdictions having different laws and practices on topics of great importance in the contemporary world of international arbitration. This will be a notable contribution to further development of this way of dispute settlement.'Professor Alexander S. Komarov, Member of the Presidium of the International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

'This valuable new sourcebook provides a detailed look at the zones of intersection between state courts and arbitration including conflicts of interest, arbitrator misconduct, and the enforcement of arbitration agreements and awards. A notable feature of the book is the country reports on judicial control of arbitration in 15 major jurisdictions. The book will prove to be a useful reference for practitioners and a source of rich insights for students and scholars of comparative international law. I highly recommend it.'Dr. Michael Moser, Twenty Essex Chambers, Past Chairman, Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre

'The intersection between arbitration and courts is at a procedural crossroad that is critically relevant in both theory and practice. The analyses collected in this book offer a unique and invaluable guidance to those who find themselves at this intersection.'Tibor Várady, Emeritus Professor Emory University and Emeritus Professor Central European University

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