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  • Print publication year: 2018
  • Online publication date: December 2018

Chapter 7 - Said and Political Theory

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Summary

In contrast to most other disciplines in the humanities, political theory has come extremely late to the study of empire and imperialism. And yet, despite the recent “turn to empire” by a number of scholars, political theorists rarely engage the work and intellectual legacy of Edward Said. This chapter seeks to address that failure of imagination by arguing that the critical disposition Said developed through his contrapuntal and humanist approach to text and politics can help theorists paint richer accounts of the complex imperial past as well as suggesting ways of thinking through that past to the politics of the present.

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