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6 - Building and Using Common Knowledge for Developing School–Community Links

from Part One - Working Relationally in the Professions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2017

Anne Edwards
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Working Relationally in and across Practices
A Cultural-Historical Approach to Collaboration
, pp. 96 - 112
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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