Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-797576ffbb-gvrqt Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-12-04T14:38:18.715Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

1 - Small cell networks overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2013

Tony Q. S. Quek
Affiliation:
Singapore University of Technology and Design
Guillaume de la Roche
Affiliation:
Mindspeed Technologies Inc.
İsmail Güvenç
Affiliation:
Florida International University
Marios Kountouris
Affiliation:
Supélec (École Supérieure d'Électricité)
Tony Q. S. Quek
Affiliation:
Singapore University of Technology and Design
Guillaume de la Roche
Affiliation:
Mindspeed Technologies
İsmail Güvenç
Affiliation:
Florida International University
Marios Kountouris
Affiliation:
SUPÉLEC (Ecole Supérieure d'Electricité)
Get access

Summary

Driven by a new generation of wireless user equipment and the proliferation of bandwidth-intensive applications, user data traffic and the corresponding network load are increasing in an exponential manner. Most of this new data traffic is being generated indoors, which requires increased link budget and coverage extension to provide satisfactory user experience. As a result, current cellular networks are reaching their breaking point and conventional cellular architectures, which are devised to cater to large coverage areas and optimized for homogeneous traffic, are facing unprecedented challenges to meet these user demands.

In this context, there has been an increasing interest to deploy small cellular access points in residential homes, subways, and offices. These network architectures, which may be either operator deployed and/or consumer installed and are comprised of a mix of low-power cells underlying the macrocell network, are commonly referred to as small cell networks. By deploying additional network nodes within the local area range and bringing the network closer to end users, spatial reuse and coverage can be significantly improved, thus allowing future cellular systems to achieve higher data rates, while retaining the seamless connectivity and mobility of cellular networks.

Inspired by the attractive features and potential advantages of small cell networks, their development and deployment are gaining momentum in the wireless industry and research communities during the last few years. It has also attracted the attention of standardization bodies such as the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE)-Advanced (see Chapter 14) and the IEEE 802.16 Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks.

Type
Chapter
Information
Small Cell Networks
Deployment, PHY Techniques, and Resource Management
, pp. 1 - 12
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

[1] V., Chandrasekhar, J. G., Andrews, and A., Gatherer, “Femtocell networks: a survey,” IEEE Commun. Mag., vol. 46, no. 9, pp. 59–67, Sep. 2008.Google Scholar
[2] D., López-Pérez, I., Guvenc, G., de la Roche, M., Kountouris, T. Q. S., Quek, and J., Zhang, “Enhanced inter-cell interference coordination challenges in heterogeneous networks,” IEEE Wireless Commun. Mag., vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 22–30, June 2011.Google Scholar
[3] H., Claussen, L. T. W., Ho, and L. G., Samuel, “An overview of the femtocell concept,” Bell Labs Technical J., vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 221–46, Mar. 2008.Google Scholar
[4] D., López-Pérez, A., Valcarce, G. de la, Roche, and J., Zhang, “OFDMA femtocells: a roadmap on interference avoidance,” IEEE Commun. Mag., vol. 47, no. 9, pp. 41–8, Sep. 2009.Google Scholar
[5] NTT DOCOMO, R1-103264, Performance of eICIC with Control Channel Coverage Limitation, 3GPP Std., Montreal, Canada, May 2010.

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×