Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-tj2md Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-21T20:02:10.034Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Edward W. Klink III
Affiliation:
Biola University, California
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
The Sheep of the Fold
The Audience and Origin of the Gospel of John
, pp. 257 - 307
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abbott, Edwin A.Johannine Grammar. London: Adam and Charles Black, 1906.Google Scholar
Aberle, David. “A Note on Relative Deprivation Theory as Applied to Millenarian and Other Cult Movements,” in Millennial Dreams in Action: Studies in Revolutionary Religious Movements. Edited by Thrupp, Sylvia L. Comparative Studies in Society and History: Supplements Series 2. The Hague: Mouton, 1962, pp. 209–14.Google Scholar
Achtemeier, Paul. “Towards the Isolation of Pre-Markan Miracle Catenae.” Journal of Biblical Literature 89 (1970), pp. 265–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adams, Edward. Constructing the World: A Study in Paul's Cosmological Language. SNTW. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 2000.Google Scholar
Aitken, Ellen B. “At the Well of Living Water: Jacob Traditions in John 4,” in The Interpretation of Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity. Edited by Evans, Craig A. Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha: Supplement Series 33. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 7. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000, pp. 342–62.Google Scholar
Aland, Kurt. Synopsis Quattuor Euangeliorum: Locis parallelis evangeliorum apocryphorum et patrum adhibitis. 13th edn. Stuttgart: Württembergische Bibelanstalt, 1985.Google Scholar
Alexander, Loveday. “Luke's Preface in the Context of Greek Preface-Writing.” Novum Testamentum 28 (1986), pp. 48–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alexander, Loveday. “Fact, Fiction, and the Genre of Acts.” NTS 44 (1988), pp. 380–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alexander, Loveday, “Ancient Book Production and the Circulation of the Gospels,” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 71–111.Google Scholar
Alexander, Philip S. “Midrash and the Gospels,” in Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983. Edited by Tuckett, C. M.. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 7. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1983, pp. 1–18.Google Scholar
Alexander, Philip S. “Rabbinic Biography and the Biography of Jesus: A Survey of the Evidence,” in Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983. Edited by Tuckett, C. M.. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 7. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1983, pp. 19–50.Google Scholar
Alexander, Philip S.Rabbinic Judaism and the New Testament.” Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 74 (1983), pp. 237–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alexander, Philip S. “‘The Parting of the Ways’ from the Perspective of Rabbinic Judaism,” in Jews and Christians: The Parting of the Ways A.D. 70 to 135. Edited by Dunn, James D. G.. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 66. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1992, pp. 1–25.Google Scholar
Allison, Dale C. Jr.Was there a ‘Lukan Community?’” Irish Biblical Studies 10 (1988), pp. 62–70.Google Scholar
Allison, Dale C. Jr.The New Moses: A Matthean Typology. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1993.Google Scholar
Alon, Gedaliah. The Jews in Their Land in the Talmudic Age (70–640 C.E.). Translated and edited by Levi, Gershon. 2 vols. Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, the Hebrew University, 1980–84.Google Scholar
Alter, Robert. The Art of Biblical Narrative. London: George Allen & Unwin, 1981.Google Scholar
Alter, Robert. “How Conventions Help Us Read: The Case of the Bible's Annunciation Type-Scene.” Proof 3 (1983), pp. 115–30.Google Scholar
Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Rev. edn. London: Verso, 1991.Google Scholar
Anderson, Hugh. Jesus and Christian Origins. New York: Oxford University Press, 1964.Google Scholar
Anderson, Paul N. “John and Mark: The Bi-Optic Gospels,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 175–88.Google Scholar
Anthony, Dick and Robbins, Thomas. “From Symbolic Realism to Structuralism.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 14 (1975), pp. 403–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Antoni, Carlo. From History to Sociology: The Transition in German Historical Thinking. Translated by Hayden V. White. London: Merlin Press, 1959.Google Scholar
Applebaum, Shim'on. “The Organization of the Jewish Communities of the Diaspora,” in The Jewish People in the First Century. Edited by Safrai, Samuel and Stern, Menahem. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1974, vol. Ⅰ, pp. 464–503.Google Scholar
Applebaum, Shim'on. “The Social and Economic Status of the Jews in the Diaspora,” in The Jewish People in the First Century. Edited by Safrai, Samuel and Stern, Menahem. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1976, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 701–27.Google Scholar
Arend, Walter. Die typischen Szenen bei Homer. Berlin: Weidmann, 1933.Google Scholar
Ascough, Richard S. “Matthew and Community Formation,” in The Gospel of Matthew in Current Study. Edited by Aune, David E. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001, pp. 96–126.Google Scholar
Ashton, John, ed. The Interpretation of John. London: SPCK, 1986.Google Scholar
Ashton, John, Understanding the Fourth Gospel. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Ashton, John, “Riddles and Mysteries: The Way, the Truth, and the Life,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 333–42.Google Scholar
Attridge, Harold W.Genre Bending in the Fourth Gospel.” Journal of Biblical Literature 121 (2002), pp. 3–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aune, David Edward. The Cultic Setting of Realized Eschatology in Early Christianity. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 28. Leiden: Brill, 1972.Google Scholar
Aune, David Edward. “The Problem of the Genre of the Gospels: A Critique of C. H. Talbert's What is a Gospel?” in Gospel Perspectives: Studies of History and Tradition in the Four Gospels. Edited by France, R. T. and Wenham, David. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1981, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 9–60.Google Scholar
Aune, David Edward. Review of Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians: The Social World of the Apostle Paul. Interpretation 39 (1985), pp. 80–82.Google Scholar
Aune, David Edward. The New Testament in its Literary Environment. Library of Early Christianity 8. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1987.Google Scholar
Aune, David Edward. “Greco-Roman Biography,” in Greco-Roman Literature and the New Testament: Selected Forms and Genres. Edited by Aune, David E. Society of Biblical Literature Sources for Biblical Study 21. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1988, pp. 107–26.Google Scholar
Baasland, Ernst. “Urkristendommen Ⅰ sosiologiens lys.” Tidskrift for Teologi og Kirke 54 (1984), pp. 45–57.Google Scholar
Bacon, B. W.Is Mark a Roman Gospel? Harvard Theological Studies 7. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1919.Google Scholar
Baird, J. A. “Genre Analysis as a Method of Historical Criticism,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1972, pp. 385–411.Google Scholar
Baker, Derek, ed. The Church in Town and Countryside. SCH 16. Oxford: Blackwell, 1979.Google Scholar
Baker, Dom Aelred. “Form and the Gospels.” Downside Review 88 (1970), pp. 14–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Balch, David L., ed. Social History of the Matthean Community: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991.Google Scholar
Baltzer, Klaus. Die Biographie der Propheten. Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag, 1975.Google Scholar
Banks, Robert. Paul's Idea of Community: The Early House Churches in their Historical Setting. Exeter: Paternoster, 1980.Google Scholar
Banton, Michael, ed. Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Religion. Association of Social Anthropologists Monographs 3. London: Tavistock, 1966.Google Scholar
Bar-Efrat, Shimon. The Art of Narration in the Bible. Tel Aviv: Sifriat Hapoalim, 1979.Google Scholar
Bar-Efrat, Shimon. Narrative Art in the Bible. Translated by Dorothea Shefer-Vanson. Journal for the Study of the Old Testament: Supplement Series 70. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Barclay, John M. G.Mirror-Reading a Polemical Letter: Galatians as a Test Case.” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 31 (1987), pp. 73–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barclay, John M. G. “Deviance and Apostasy: Some Applications of Deviance Theory to First-Century Judaism and Christianity,” in Modeling Early Christianity: Social-Scientific Studies of the New Testament in its Context. Edited by Esler, Philip F. London: Routledge, 1995, pp. 114–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barclay, John M. G.Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora from Alexander to Trajan (323 BCE – 117 CE). Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1996.Google Scholar
Barclay, John M. G. “The Family as Bearer of Religion in Judaism and Early Christianity,” in Constructing Early Christian Families. Edited by Moxnes, Halvor. London: Routledge, 1997, pp. 66–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barr, David L.Towards a Definition of the Gospel Genre: A Generic Analysis and Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels and the Socratic Dialogues by Means of Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy.” Ph.D. diss., Florida State University, 1974.Google Scholar
Barr, James. Holy Scripture: Canon, Authority, Criticism. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Barrett, Charles Kingsley. “The Old Testament in the Fourth Gospel.” Journal of Theological Studies 48 (1947), pp. 155–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barrett, Charles Kingsley. The Gospel of John and Judaism. Translated by D. M. Smith. London: SPCK, 1975.Google Scholar
Barrett, Charles Kingsley. The Gospel According to St. John. 2nd edn. London: SPCK, 1978.Google Scholar
Barrett, Charles Kingsley. “Johannine Christianity,” in Christian Beginnings: Word and Community from Jesus to Post-Apostolic Times. Edited by Jürgen Becker, . Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1993, pp. 330–58.Google Scholar
Barrett, Charles Kingsley. “John and Judaism,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2001, pp. 231–46.Google Scholar
Barthes, Roland. S/Z. Translated by Richard Miller. New York: Hill and Wang, 1974.Google Scholar
Barton, John. Holy Writings, Sacred Text: The Canon in Early Christianity. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1997.Google Scholar
Barton, Stephen C.The Communal Dimensions of Earliest Christianity.” Journal of Theological Studies 43 (1992), pp. 399–427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barton, Stephen C. “Early Christianity and the Sociology of the Sect,” in The Open Text: New Directions for Biblical Studies? Edited by Watson, Francis. London: SCM Press, 1993, pp. 140–62.Google Scholar
Barton, Stephen C.Living as Families in the Light of the New Testament.” Interpretation 52 (1998), pp. 130–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barton, Stephen C. “Can We Identify the Gospel Audiences?” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 173–94.Google Scholar
Barton, Stephen C. “Christian Community in the Light of the Gospel of John,” in Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole. Edited by Horrell, David G and Tuckett, Christopher M. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 99. Leiden: Brill, 2000, pp. 279–301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bassler, Jouette M.The Galileans: A Neglected Factor in Johannine Community Research.” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 43 (1981), pp. 243–57.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.Jude and the Relatives of Jesus in the Early Church. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1990.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.The Parting of the Ways: What Happened and Why?Studia Theologica 47 (1993), pp. 135–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.Papias and Polycrates on the Origin of the Fourth Gospel.” Journal of Theological Studies 44 (1993), pp. 24–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.The Beloved Disciple as Ideal Author,” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 49 (1993), pp. 21–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.The Apocalypse of Peter: A Jewish Christian Apocalypse from the Time of the Bar Kokhba.” Apocrypha 5 (1994), pp. 87–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.Nicodemus and the Gurion Family.” Journal of Theological Studies 47 (1996), pp. 1–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J. “Introduction,” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 1–7.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J. “For Whom Were the Gospels Written?,” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 9–48.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J. “John for Readers of Mark,” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 147–71.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.Response to Philip Esler.” Scottish Journal of Theology 51 (1998), pp. 248–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J. “The Audience of the Fourth Gospel,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 101–11.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.Gospel Women: Studies of the Named Women in the Gospels. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 2002.Google Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J.The Eyewitnesses and the Gospel Traditions.” Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus 1 (2003), pp. 28–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauckham, Richard J., ed. The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998.Google Scholar
Baumbach, Günther. “Die Anfänge der Kirchwerdung im Urchristentum.” Kairos 24 (1982), pp. 17–30.Google Scholar
Baumgarten-Crusius, Ludwig. Theologische Auslegung der johanneischen Schriften. Thüringen: Jena, 1843–45, vols. Ⅰ–Ⅱ.Google Scholar
Baxter, Tony. Review of Richard Bauckham, ed., The Gospels for All Christians. Evangel 19 (2001), p. 55.Google Scholar
Beardslee, William A.Literary Criticism of the New Testament. Guides to Biblical Scholarship. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1970.Google Scholar
Beasley-Murray, George R.John. 2nd edn. Word Biblical Commentary 36. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1999.Google Scholar
Beaton, Richard. Review of David C. Sim, The Gospel of Matthew and Christian Judaism: The History and Social Setting of the Matthean Community. Journal of Theological Studies 51 (2000), pp. 242–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beavis, May Ann. Mark's Audience: The Literary and Social Setting of Mark: 4.11–12. Journal for the Study of the New TestamentSup 33. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Beck, David R.The Narrative Function of Anonymity in Fourth Gospel Characterization.” Semeia 63 (1993), pp. 143–58.Google Scholar
Becker, Howard S.Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance. New York: Free Press, 1963.Google Scholar
Becker, Howard S., ed. The Other Side: Perspectives on Deviance. New York: Free Press, 1964.Google Scholar
Beckford, James A.Religious Organization.” Current Sociology 21 (1973), pp. 1–170.Google Scholar
Bellah, Robert N. “Christianity and Symbolic Realism,” in Beyond Belief: Essays on Religion in a Post-Traditional World. Edited by Bellah, Robert. New York: Harper & Row, 1970, pp. 236–59.Google Scholar
Bellah, Robert N.Comment on ‘The Limits of Symbolic Realism.’” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 13 (1974), pp. 487–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benson, J. Kenneth and Dorsett, James H. “Toward a Theory of Religious Organizations.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 10 (1971), pp. 138–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berger, Klaus. Exegese des Neuen Testaments: neue Wege vom Text zur Auslegung. Uni-Taschenbücher 658. Heidelberg: Quelle & Meyer, 1977.Google Scholar
Berger, Peter L.The Sociological Study of Sectarianism.” Social Research 21 (1954), pp. 467–85.Google Scholar
Berger, Peter L.The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of Religion. Garden City: Doubleday, 1967.Google Scholar
Berger, Peter L. and Luckmann, Thomas. The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge. Garden City: Doubleday, 1966.Google Scholar
Best, Ernest. Following Jesus: Discipleship in the Gospel of Mark. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 4. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Best, Ernest. Mark: The Gospel as Story. Studies of the New Testament and Its World. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1983.Google Scholar
Best, Thomas. “Sociological Study of the New Testament: Promise and Peril of A New Discipline.” Scottish Journal of Theology 36 (1983), pp. 181–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Betz, Otto. “The Concept of the So-Called ‘Divine Man’ in Mark's Christology,” in Studies in New Testament and Early Christian Literature: Essays in Honor of Allen P. Wikgren. Edited by Aune, David E. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 33. Leiden: Brill, 1972, pp. 229–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beutler, Johannes. Die Johannesbriefe: Übersetz und erklärt. 3rd edn. Regensburger Neues Testament. Regensburg: Friedrich Pustet, 2000.Google Scholar
Beutler, Johannes. “Faith and Confession: The Purpose of John,” in Word, Theology, and Community in John. Edited by Painter, J., Culpepper, R. A., and Segovia, F. F.. Festschrift for Robert Kysar. St. Louis: Chalice Press, 2002, pp. 19–31.Google Scholar
Bieder, Werner. Gottes Sendung und der missionarische Auftrag der Kirche nach Matthäus, Lukas, Paulus und Johannes. Theologische Studien 82. Zurich: EVZ-Verlag, 1965.Google Scholar
Bieringer, Reimund, Didier Pollefeyt, and Frederique Vandecasteele-Vanneuville. “Wrestling with Johannine Anti-Judaism: A Hermeneutical Framework for the Analysis of the Current Debate,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 3–37.Google Scholar
Bilezikian, Gilbert G.The Liberated Gospel: A Comparison of the Gospel of Mark and Greek Tragedy. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1977.Google Scholar
Blank, Josef. Krisis: Untersuchungen zur johanneischen Christologie und Eschatologie. Freiburg: Lambertus, 1964.Google Scholar
Blenkinsopp, Joseph. “Interpretation and Tendency to Sectarianism: An Aspect of Second Temple Judaism,” in Jewish and Christian Self-Definition: Aspects of Judaism in the Graeco-Roman Period. Edited by Sanders, E. P. with Baumgarten, A. I. and Mendelson, A.. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1981, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 1–26.Google Scholar
Bloch, Marc. The Historian's Craft. Translated by Peter Putnam. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1954.Google Scholar
Blomberg, Craig. L. “Form Criticism,” in Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. Edited by Green, Joel B, McKnight, Scot, and Marshall, I. Howard. Downers Grove, Ill.: Intervarsity, 1992.Google Scholar
Blomberg, Craig L.Review of Richard Bauckham, ed., The Gospels for All Christians. Themelios 25 (2000), pp. 78–80.Google Scholar
Blomberg, Craig L.The Historical Reliability of John's Gospel: Issues and Commentary. Downers Grove, Ill.: Intervarsity, 2001.Google Scholar
Blomberg, Craig. L. “The Historical Reliability of John: Rushing in Where Angels Fear to Tread?,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 71–82.Google Scholar
Blomberg, Craig L.Interpreting Old Testament Prophetic Literature in Matthew: Double Fulfillment.” Trinity Journal 23 (2002), pp. 17–33.Google Scholar
Böcher, Otto. “Johanneisches in der Apokalypse des Johannes.” NTS 27 (1981), pp. 310–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boer, Martinus C. de. “John 4:27 — Women (and Men) in the Gospel and Community of John,” in Women in the Biblical Tradition. Edited by Brooks, George J. New York: Edwin Mellen, 1992, pp. 208–30.Google Scholar
Boer, Martinus C. de. “The Depiction of ‘the Jews’ in John's Gospel: Matters of Behavior and Identity,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 141–57.Google Scholar
Bogart, John. Orthodox and Heretical Perfectionism in the Johannine Community as Evident in the First Epistle of John. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 33. Missoula, Mont.: Scholars Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Boismard, Marie-Émile. Moses or Jesus: An Essay in Johannine Christology. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 84-A. Translated by B. T. Viviano. Leuven: University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Boismard, Marie-Emile and Lamouille, Arnaud. L'Evangile de Jean: Synopse des quatre évangiles. Paris: du Cerf, 1977, vol. Ⅲ.Google Scholar
Boon, James A.Other Tribes, Other Scribes: Symbolic Anthropology in the Comparative Study of Cultures, Histories, Religions, and Texts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Booth, Wayne. The Rhetoric of Fiction. 2nd edn. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borgen, Peder. Bread from Heaven: An Exegetical Study of the Concept of Manna in the Gospel of John and the Writings of Philo. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 10. Leiden: Brill, 1965.
Borgen, Peder. Philo, John and Paul: New Perspectives on Judaism and Early Christianity. Brown Judaic Studies 131. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Borgen, Peder. Philo of Alexandria: An Exegete for His Time. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 86. Leiden: Brill, 1997.Google Scholar
Bornhäuser, Karl. Das Johannesevangelium: Eine Missionsschrift für Israel. Beiträge zur Förderung christlicher Theologie 2/15. Gütersloh: Bertelsmann, 1928.Google Scholar
Bornkamm, Günther, Barth, Gerhard, and Held, Heinz Joachim. Tradition and Interpretation in Matthew. Translated by Percy Scott. London: SCM Press, 1963.Google Scholar
Botha, J. Eugene. Jesus and the Samaritan Woman: A Speech Act Reading of John 4:1–42. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 65. Leiden: Brill, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bottomore, Tom and Nisbet, Robert, eds. A History of Sociological Analysis. London: Heinemann, 1978.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre. Language and Symbolic Power. Edited by Thompson, John B. Translated by Gino Raymond and Matthew Adamson. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Bowe, Barbara E.Review of Richard Bauckham, ed., The Gospels for All Christians. Concordia Theological Monthly 27 (2000), p. 295.Google Scholar
Bowersock, G. W.Fiction as History: Nero to Julian. Sather Classical Lectures 1991. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Bowman, John W.Samaritan Studies 1: The Fourth Gospel and the Samaritans,” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 40 (1957–58), pp. 298–327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowman, John W.The Gospel of Mark: The New Christian Jewish Passover Haggadah. Studia Post-Biblica 8. Leiden: Brill, 1965.Google Scholar
Box, G. H.The Jewish Environment of Early Christianity.” The Expositor 12 (1916), pp. 1–25.Google Scholar
Boyarin, Daniel. Dying for God: Martyrdom and the Making of Christianity and Judaism. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Brawley, Robert L.An Absent Complement and Intertextuality in John 19:28–29.” Journal of Biblical Literature 112 (1993), pp. 427–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brenk, Frederick E. Review of Richard Burridge, What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography. Gnomon 66 (1994), pp. 492–96.Google Scholar
Bretschneider, Karl G.Probabilia de evangelii et epistolarum Joannis Apostoli, indole et origine. Leipzig: University Press, 1820.Google Scholar
Brodie, Thomas L.The Quest for the Origin of John's Gospel: A Source-Oriented Approach. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Brodie, Thomas L.The Gospel According to John: A Literary and Theological Commentary. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Brodie, Thomas L.The Crucial Bridge: The Elijah-Elisha Narrative as an Interpretive Synthesis of Genesis-Kings and A Literary Model for the Gospels. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Gospel According to John. The Anchor Bible 29. Garden City: Doubleday, 1966, vol. Ⅰ.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Kerygma of the Gospel According to John: The Johannine View of Jesus in Modern Studies.” Interpretation 21 (1967), pp. 387–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Gospel According to John. The Anchor Bible 29a. Garden City: Doubleday, 1970, vol. Ⅱ.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.Jesus and Elisha.” Perspective 12 (1971), pp. 85–104.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.Johannine Ecclesiology — The Community's Origins.” Interpretation 31 (1977), pp. 379–93.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E. “‘Other Sheep Not of This Fold’: The Johannine Perspective on Christian Diversity in the Late First Century.” Journal of Biblical Literature 97 (1978), pp. 5–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Community of the Beloved Disciple: The Life, Loves, and Hates of an Individual Church in New Testament Times. New York: Paulist Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.New Testament Background for the Concept of Local Church.” Proceedings of the Catholic Theological Society of America 36 (1981), pp. 1–14.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Epistles of John. nThe Anchor Bible 30. London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1982.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.The Churches the Apostles Left Behind. London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1984.Google Scholar
Brown, Raymond E.An Introduction to the Gospel of John. The Anchor Bible Reference Library. Edited by Moloney, Francis J. New York: Doubleday, 2003.Google Scholar
Bruce, F. F.Men and Movements in the Primitive Church: Studies in Non-Pauline Christianity. Exeter: Paternoster, 1979.Google Scholar
Bryant, J. M.The Sect-church Dynamic and Christian Expansion in the Roman Empire: Persecution, Penitential Discipline, and Schism in Sociological Perspective.” British Journal of Sociology 44 (1993), pp. 303–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buchanan, George Wesley. “The Samaritan Origin of the Gospel of John,” in Religions in Antiquity: Essays in Memory of Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough. Edited by Neusner, Jacob. Studies in the History of Religion 14. Leiden: Brill, 1968, pp. 149–75.Google Scholar
Buchanan, George Wesley. Introduction to Intertextuality. Lewiston: Mellen Biblical Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Bühner, Jan Adolph. Der Gesandte und sein Weg im vierten Evangelium: Die Kultur- und religionsgeschichtlichen Grundlagen der johanneischen Sendungschristologie sowie ihre traditionsgeschichtliche Entwicklung. WUNT 2/2. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1977.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. “Die Bedeutung der neuerschlossenen mandäischen und manichäischen Quellen für das Verständnis des Johannesevangeliums.” ZNW 24 (1925), pp. 100–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. Theology of the New Testament. Translated by Kendrick Grobel. London: SCM Press, 1952, vol. Ⅰ.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. Theology of the New Testament. Translated by Kendrick Grobel. London: SCM Press, 1955, vol. Ⅱ.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. Primitive Christianity in its Contemporary Setting. Translated by Reginald H. Fuller. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1956.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. The History of the Synoptic Tradition. Translated by John Marsh. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1963.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. The Gospel of John: A Commentary. Translated by G. R. Beasley-Murray. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1971.Google Scholar
Bultmann, Rudolf. The Johannine Epistles: A Commentary on the Johannine Epistles. Translated by R. Philip O'Hara, Lane C. McGaughy, and Robert W. Funk. Hermeneia. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1973.Google Scholar
Burge, Gary M.The Anointed Community: The Holy Spirit in the Johannine Tradition. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1987.Google Scholar
Burge, Gary M. “Situating John's Gospel in History,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 35–46.Google Scholar
Burke, Peter. History and Social Theory. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1992.Google Scholar
Burnett, Fred W.Characterization and Reader Construction of Characters in the Gospels.” Semeia 63 (1993), pp. 1–28.Google Scholar
Burridge, Kenelm. New Heaven, New Earth: A Study of Millenarian Activities. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1969.Google Scholar
Burridge, Richard A. “Gospel,” in A Dictionary of Biblical Interpretation. Edited by Coggin, Richard J and Houlden, James L. London: SCM Press, 1990, pp. 266–68.Google Scholar
Burridge, Richard A.What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 70. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Burridge, Richard A. “About People, by People, for People: Gospel Genre and Audiences,” in The Gospels for All Christians: Rethinking the Gospel Audiences. Edited by Bauckham, Richard. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998, pp. 113–45.Google Scholar
Burridge, Richard A. “Gospel Genre, Christological Controversy and the Absence of Rabbinic Biography: Some Implications of the Biographical Hypothesis,” in Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole. Edited by Horrell, David G and Tuckett, Christopher M. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 99. Leiden: Brill, 2000, pp. 137–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burridge, Richard A.What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography. 2nd edn. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004.Google Scholar
Busch, E. W.Tragic Action in the Second Gospel.” Journal of Religion 11 (1931), pp. 346–58.Google Scholar
Busse, Ulrich. “Die Tempelmetaphorik als ein Beispel von implizitem Rekurs auf die biblische Tradition im Johannesevangelium,” in The Scriptures in the Gospels. Edited by Tuckett, Christopher M. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 131. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1997, pp. 395–428.Google Scholar
Byrskog, Samuel. Story as History-History as Story: The Gospel Traditions in the Context of Ancient Oral History. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 123. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2000.Google Scholar
Caird, G. B. New Testament Theology. Edited and completed by Hurst, L. D.. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Cairns, David. “The Thought of Peter Berger.” Scottish Journal of Theology 27 (1974), pp. 181–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, Averil. Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire: The Development of Christian Discourse. Sather Classical Lectures 55. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Campenhausen, Hans. The Formation of the Christian Bible. Translated by John Austin Baker. London: Adam and Charles Black, 1974.Google Scholar
Carlson, Stephen C.Clement of Alexandria on the ‘Order’ of the Gospels.” NTS 47 (2001), pp. 118–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carney, T. F.The Shape of the Past: Models and Antiquity. Lawrence, Kans.: Coronado Press, 1975.Google Scholar
Carrington, Philip. The Primitive Christian Calendar: A Study in the Making of the Markan Gospel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1952.Google Scholar
Carroll, Kenneth L.The Fourth Gospel and the Exclusion of Christians from the Synagogues.” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 40 (1957), pp. 19–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carson, Donald A. “Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel: After Dodd, What?,” in Gospel Perspectives: Studies of History and Tradition in the Four Gospels. Edited by France, R. T. and Wenham, David. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1981, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 83–145.Google Scholar
Carson, Donald A.Understanding Misunderstanding in the Fourth GospelTyndale Bulletin 33 (1982), pp. 59–91.Google Scholar
Carson, Donald A.The Purpose of the Fourth Gospel: John 20:31 Reconsidered.” Journal of Biblical Literature 106 (1987), pp. 639–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carson, Donald A. “John and the Johannine Epistles,” in It is Written: Scripture Citing Scripture: Essays in Honor of Barnabas Lindars. Edited by Carson, D. A. and Willaimson, H. G. M.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988, pp. 245–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carson, Donald A.The Gospel According to John. Pillar New Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991.Google Scholar
Carson, Donald A. “Redaction Criticism: On the Legitimacy and Illegitimacy of a Literary Tool,” in Scripture and Truth. Rev. and enl. edn. Edited by Carson, D. A. and Woodbridge, John D. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1992, pp. 115–42.Google Scholar
Carson, Donald A.Syntactical and Text-Critical Observations on John 20:30–31: One More Round on the Purpose of the Fourth Gospel.” Journal of Biblical Literature 124 (2005), pp. 693–714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carter, Warren. “Community Definition and Matthew's Gospel,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1997, pp. 637–63.Google Scholar
Casson, L.Travel in the Ancient World. London: Allen & Unwin, 1974.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, James H.The Beloved Disciple: Whose Witness Validates the Gospel of John?Valley Forge, Pa.: Trinity Press International, 1995.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, James H. “The Gospel of John: Exclusivism Caused by a Social Setting Different from That of Jesus (John 11:54 and 14:6),” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 247–78.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, M. P.Trade Routes and Commerce in the Roman Empire. 2nd edn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1926.Google Scholar
Chatman, Seymour. Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978.Google Scholar
Childs, Brevard S. “The Sensus Literalis of Scripture: An Ancient and Modern Problem,” in Beiträge zur Alttestamentlichen Theologie: Festschrift für Walther Zimmerli zum 70. Geburtstag. Edited by Donner, Herbert, Hanhart, Robert, and Smend, Rudolf. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1977, pp. 80–93.Google Scholar
Childs, Brevard S.The Canonical Shape of the Prophetic Literature.” Interpretation 32 (1978), pp. 46–55.Google Scholar
Childs, Brevard S.The New Testament as Canon: An Introduction. London: SCM Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Childs, Brevard S.Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments: Theological Reflection on the Christian Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1992.Google Scholar
Childs, Brevard S.Retrospective Reading of the Old Testament Prophets.” Zeitschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft 108 (1996), pp. 362–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clayton, Jay and Rothstein, Eric, eds. Influence and Intertextuality in Literary History. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Coenen, L. “ἐκκλησία,” in New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology. Edited by Brown, Colin. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1975–86, vol. Ⅰ, pp. 291–307.Google Scholar
Cohen, Anthony P.The Symbolic Construction of Community. KI 1. London: Routledge, 1985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, S. J. D., ed. The Jewish Family in Antiquity. Brown Judaic Studies 289. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Collins, Adela Yarbro. “Narrative, History, and Gospel.” Semeia 43 (1988), pp. 145–53.Google Scholar
Collins, Adela Yarbro. Review of Richard Burridge, What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography. Journal of Religion 75 (1995), pp. 239–46.Google Scholar
Collins, John J.The Apocalyptic Imagination: An Introduction to the Jewish Matrix of Christianity. New York: Crossroad, 1984.Google Scholar
Collins, Raymond F.The Representative Figures of the Fourth Gospel — Ⅰ.” Downside Review 94 (1976), pp. 26–46,CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collins, Raymond F.The Representative Figures of the Fourth Gospel — Ⅱ.” Downside Review 94 (1976), pp. 118–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collins, Raymond F. “Speaking of the Jews: ‘Jews’ in the Discourse Material of the Fourth Gospel,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 158–75.Google Scholar
Colpe, Carsten. “The Oldest Jewish-Christian Community,” in Christian Beginnings: Word and Community from Jesus to Post-Apostolic Times. Edited by Jürgen Becker, . Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1993, pp. 75–102.Google Scholar
Conway, Colleen M.The Production of the Johannine Community: A New Historicist Perspective.” Journal of Biblical Literature 121 (2002), pp. 479–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conway, Colleen M.Speaking through Ambiguity: Minor Characters in the Fourth Gospel.” Biblical Interpretation 10 (2002), pp. 324–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conzelmann, Hans. The Theology of St. Luke. Translated by Geoffrey Buswell. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1960.Google Scholar
Conzelmann, Hans. “Luke's Place in the Development of Early Christianity,” in Studies in Luke-Acts: Essays Presented in Honor of Paul Schubert. Edited by Keck, Leander and Martyn, J. Louis. Nashville: Abingdon, 1966, pp. 298–316.Google Scholar
Coser, Lewis. The Functions of Social Conflict. New York: Free Press, 1956.Google Scholar
Creed, J. M.The Gospel According to St. Luke. London: Macmillan, 1930.Google Scholar
Crosman, Robert. “Do Readers Make Meaning?,” in The Reader in the Text: Essays on Audience and Interpretation. Edited by Suleiman, Susan R and Crosman, Inge. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980, pp. 3–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crossan, John Dominic. The Historical Jesus: The Life of A Mediterranean Peasant. New York: Harper Collins, 1992.Google Scholar
Crossan, John Dominic. The Birth of Christianity: Discovering What Happened in the Years immediately after the Execution of Jesus. San Francisco: Harper & Collins, 1998.Google Scholar
Culler, Jonathan. “Prolegomena to a Theory of Reading,” in The Reader in the Text: Essays on Audience and Interpretation. Edited by Suleiman, Susan R and Crosman, Inge. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980, pp. 46–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Culler, Jonathan. The Pursuit of Signs: Semiotics, Literature, Deconstruction. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Cullmann, Oscar. “Les récentes études sur la formation de la tradition évangélique.” Revue d'histoire et de philosophie religieuses 5 (1925), pp. 564–79.Google Scholar
Cullmann, Oscar. Early Christian Worship. Translated by A. Stewart Todd and James B. Torrance. Studies in Biblical Theology 10. London: SCM Press, 1953.Google Scholar
Cullmann, Oscar. “The Plurality of the Gospels as a Theological Problem in Antiquity: A Study in the History of Dogma,” in The Early Church: Oscar Cullmann. Edited by Higgins, A. J. B.. Translated by A. J. B. Higgins and S. Godman. London: SCM Press, 1956, pp. 39–54.Google Scholar
Cullmann, Oscar. The Johannine Circle: Its Place in Judaism, Among the Disciples of Jesus and in Early Christianity: A Study in the Origin of the Gospel of John. Translated by John Bowden. London: SCM Press, 1976.Google Scholar
Culpepper, R. Alan. The Johannine School: An Evaluation of the Johannine-School Hypothesis Based on an Investigation of the Nature of Ancient Schools. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 26. Missoula, Mont.: Scholars Press, 1975.Google Scholar
Culpepper, R. Alan. “The Narrator in the Fourth Gospel: Intratextual Relationships,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1982, pp. 81–96.Google Scholar
Culpepper, R. Alan. Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel: A Study in Literary Design. Foundations and Facets: New Testament. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1983.Google Scholar
Culpepper, R. Alan. “The Theology of the Gospel of John,” RE 85 (1988), pp. 417–32.Google Scholar
Culpepper, R. Alan. “Anti-Judaism in the Fourth Gospel as a Theological Problem for Christian Interpreters,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 61–82.Google Scholar
Cweikowski, Frederick J.The Beginnings of the Church. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1988.Google Scholar
Dahl, Nils Alstrup. “The Plurality of the Pauline Epistles as a Problem in the Ancient Church,” in Neotestamentica et patristica, eine Freundesgabe, Oscar Cullmann zu seinem 60 Geburtstag. Edited by Wilder, A. N.et al. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 6. Leiden: Brill, 1962, pp. 161–71.Google Scholar
Dahl, Nils Alstrup. Jesus in the Memory of the Early Church. Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1976.Google Scholar
Damrosch, David. The Narrative Covenant: Transformations of Genre in the Growth of Biblical Literature. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1987.Google Scholar
Daniélou, Jean. “Christianity as a Jewish Sect,” in The Crucible of Christianity: Judaism, Hellenism and the Historical Background of the Christian Faith. Edited by Toynbee, Arnold. London: Thames & Hudson, 1969, pp. 275–82.Google Scholar
Davies, Margaret. Rhetoric and Reference in the Fourth Gospel. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 69. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Davies, William D.The Gospel and the Land: Early Christianity and Jewish Territorial Doctrine. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Davies, William D. and Allison, Dale C. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to Saint Matthew. The International Critical Commentary. 3 vols. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1988–97.Google Scholar
Dawson, David. Allegorical Readers and Cultural Revision in Ancient Alexandria. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.Google Scholar
DeConick, April D. “John Rivals Thomas: From Community Conflict to Gospel Narrative,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 303–11.Google Scholar
Deeley, Mary Katharine. “Ezekiel's Shepherd and John's Jesus: A Case Study in the Appropriation of Biblical Texts,” in Studies in Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity: Investigations and Proposals. Edited by Evans, Craig A and Sanders, James A. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 148. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997, pp. 252–64.Google Scholar
Deissmann, Adolf. Light from the Ancient Near East: The New Testament Illustrated from Recently Discovered Texts of the Graeco-Roman World. 2nd edn. Translated by Lionel R. M. Strachan. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.Google Scholar
Demerath, Nicholas J. . “In a Sow's Ear: A Reply to Goode.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6 (1967), pp. 77–84.Google Scholar
Demerath, Nicholas J. . “Son of a Sow's Ear.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6 (1967), pp. 257–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Derrida, Jacques. Of Grammatology. Translated by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1976.Google Scholar
Detweiler, Robert. “How to Read a Jaguar: A Response to Mary Gerhart.” Semeia 43 (1988), pp. 45–51.Google Scholar
Dettwiler, Andreas. Die Gegenwart des Erhöhten: Eine exegetische Studie Zu den johanneischen Abschiedsreden (Joh. 13,31–16,33) unter besonderer Berücksichtigung ihres Relectere-Charakters. Forschungen zur Religion und Literatur des Alten und Neuen Testaments 169. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dewey, Arthur J. “The Eyewitness of History: Visionary Consciousness in the Fourth Gospel,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 59–70.Google Scholar
Dewey, Joanna. “The Gospel of John in Its Oral-Written Media World,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 239–52.Google Scholar
Dibelius, Martin. From Tradition to Gospel. Translated by Bertram Lee Woolf. London: Ivor Nicholson and Watson, 1934.Google Scholar
Dieffenbach, Ludwig A.Über einege wahrscheinliche Interpolationen im Evangelium Johannis,” Kritisch. Journ. d. neuest. theol. Lit. 5 (1816), pp. 1–16.Google Scholar
Dihle, Albrecht. “The Gospels and Greek Biography,” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Translated by John Bowden. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 361–86.Google Scholar
Dittes, James E.Typing the Typologies: Some Parallels in the Career of Church-Sect and Extrinsic-Intrinsic.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 10 (1971), pp. 375–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dodd, Charles H.The Framework of the Gospel Narrative.” Expository Times 43 (1931–32), pp. 396–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dodd, Charles H.The Apostolic Preaching and its Developments: Three Lectures with an Appendix on Eschatology and History. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1936.Google Scholar
Dodd, Charles H.The Interpretation of the Fourth Gospel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dodd, Charles H.Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dodd, Charles H.More New Testament Studies. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Dods, Marcus. The Gospel of St. John. 10th edn. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1906.Google Scholar
Donahue, John R. “The Quest for the Community of Mark's Gospel,” in The Four Gospels 1992. Edited by Segbroeck, F.et al. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 100. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1992, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 817–38.Google Scholar
Donahue, John R., ed. Life in Abundance: Studies of John's Gospel in Tribute to Raymond E. Brown. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Doty, William G. “The Concept of Genre in Literary Analysis,” in The Genre of the Gospels: Studies in Methodology, Comparative Research and Compositional Analysis. Missoula: Society of Biblical Literature, 1972, pp. 29–64.Google Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Purity and Danger. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1996.Google Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Essays in the Sociology of Perception. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982.Google Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Natural Symbols: Explorations in Cosmology. New York: Pantheon Books, 1982.Google Scholar
Downing, F. Gerald. The Church and Jesus: A Study in History, Philosophy, and Theology. Studies in Biblical Theology, Second Series 10. London: SCM Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Downing, F. Gerald. “Contemporary Analogies to the Gospel and Acts: ‘Genres’ or ‘Motifs’?,” in Synoptic Studies: The Ampleforth Conferences of 1982 and 1983. Edited by Tuckett, C. M.. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 7. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1983, pp. 51–65.Google Scholar
Duff, David. “Intertextuality versus Genre Theory: Bakhtin, Kristeva and the Question of Genre.” Paragraph 25 (2002), pp. 54–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duff, Jeremy. Review of Richard Bauckham, ed., The Gospels for All Christians. Anvil 16 (1999), pp. 134–35.Google Scholar
Duke, Paul D.Irony in the Fourth Gospel. Atlanta; John Knox, 1985.Google Scholar
Dunderberg, Ismo. “The Beloved Disciple in John: Ideal Figure in an Early Christian Controversy,” in Fair Play: Diversity and Conflicts in Early Christianity: Essays in Honor of Heikki Räisänen. Edited by Dunderberg, Ismo, Tuckett, Christopher, and Syreeni, Kari. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 103. Leiden: Brill, 2002, pp. 243–69.Google Scholar
Duling, Dennis C. “Millennialism,” in The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation. Edited by Rohrbaugh, Richard L. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1996, pp. 183–205.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G.Unity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity. 2nd edn. London: SCM Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G.The Parting of the Ways between Christianity and Judaism and their Significance for the Character of Christianity. London: SCM Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G. “Let John be John: A Gospel for its Time,” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 293–322.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G. “The Embarrassment of History: Reflections on the Problem of ‘Anti-Judaism’ in the Fourth Gospel,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 41–60.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G.Christianity in the Making: Volume 1: Jesus Remembered. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003.Google Scholar
Dunn, James D. G., ed. Jews and Christians: The Parting of the Ways A.D. 70 to 135. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 66. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1993.Google Scholar
Durkheim, Emile. The Rules of Sociological Method. Translated by Sarah A. Solovay and John H. Mueller. New York: Free Press, 1965.Google Scholar
Drummond, James. An Inquiry into the Character and Authorship of the Fourth Gospel. London: Williams and Norgate, 1903.Google Scholar
Dyson, S.The Relevance for Roman Archeologists of Recent Approaches to Archeology in Greece.” Journal of Roman Archaeology 2 (1989), pp. 143–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eckermann, Jacob C. R.Uber die eigentlich sicheren Gründe des Glaubens an die Hauptthatsachen der Geschichte Jesu, und über die wahrscheinliche Entstehung der Evangelien und der Apostelgeschichte,” Theologische Beiträge 2 (1976), pp. 106–256.Google Scholar
Eco, Umberto. The Role of the Reader: Explorations in the Semiotics of Texts. London: Hutchinson, 1981.Google Scholar
Edwards, Mark J. “Biography and Biographic,” in Portraits: Biographical Representation in the Greek and Latin Literature of the Roman Empire. Edited by Edwards, Mark J and Swain, Simon. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997, pp. 227–34.Google Scholar
Eister, Alan W.Toward a Radical Critique of Church-Sect Typologizing: Comment on ‘Some Critical Observations on the Church-Sect Dimension.’Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6 (1967), pp. 85–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eister, Alan W. “H. Richard Neibuhr and the Paradox of Religious Organization: A Radical Critique,” in Beyond the Classics? Essays in the Scientific Study of Religion.. Edited by Clock, Charles Y and Hammond, Phillip E. New York: Harper & Row, 1973, pp. 355–408.Google Scholar
Ellingworth, Paul. Review of Richard Bauckham, ed., The Gospels for All Christians. Evangelical Quarterly 71 (1999), pp. 273–75.Google Scholar
Elliott, John H.A Home for the Homeless: A Sociological Exegesis of 1 Peter, Its Situation and Strategy. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1981.Google Scholar
Elliott, John H. Review of Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians: The Social World of the Apostle Paul. Religious Studies Review 11 (1985), pp. 329–35.Google Scholar
Elliott, John H.Social-Scientific Criticism of the New Testament: More on Methods and Models.” Semeia 35 (1986), 1–33.Google Scholar
Elliott, John H.What is Social-Scientific Criticism. Guides to Biblical Scholarship New Testament Series. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1993.Google Scholar
Ellis, E. Earle. “Gospels Criticism: A Perspective on the State of the Art,” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 26–52.Google Scholar
Ellis, E. Earle. The Old Testament in Early Christianity: Canon and Interpretation in the Light of Modern Research. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 54. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1991.Google Scholar
Enz, Jacob J.The Book of Exodus as a Literary Type for the Gospel of John.” Journal of Biblical Literature 76 (1957), pp. 208–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esler, Philip F.Community and Gospel in Luke-Acts: The Social and Political Motivations of Lucan Theology. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 57. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esler, Philip F.The First Christians in Their Social Worlds: Social-Scientific Approaches to New Testament Interpretation. London: Routledge, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esler, Philip F.Community and Gospel in Early Christianity: A Response to Richard Bauckham's Gospels for All Christians.” Scottish Journal of Theology 51 (1998), pp. 235–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esler, Philip F., ed. Modelling Early Christianity: Social-Scientific studies of the New Testament in its Context. London: Routledge, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eslinger, Lyle. “The Wooing of the Woman at the Well: Jesus, the Reader and Reader-Response Criticism.” Journal of Literature and Theology 1 (1987), pp. 167–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eslinger, Lyle. “Inner-Biblical Exegesis and Inner-Biblical Allusion: The Question of Category.” Vetus Testamentum 49 (1992), pp. 47–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, Craig A. and Sanders, James A, eds. The Function of Scripture in Early Jewish and Christian Tradition. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 154. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 6. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Evans, Christopher Francis. Saint Luke. Trinity Press International New Testament Commentaries. Philadelphia: Trinity Press International, 1990.Google Scholar
Evans, C. Stephen. The Historical Christ and the Jesus of Faith: The Incarnational Narrative as History. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ewald, Heinrich. History of Israel. 2 vols. Translated by Russell Martineau. London: Longmans and Green, 1869–86.Google Scholar
Fackre, Gabriel. “Narrative Theology: An Overview.” Interpretation 37 (1983), pp. 340–52.Google Scholar
Farley, Edward and Peter C. Hodgson. “Scripture and Tradition,” in Christian Theology: An Introduction to its Traditions and Tasks. Edited by Hodgson, Peter C and King, Robert H. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982, pp. 35–61.Google Scholar
Farmer, William R. “The Problem of Christian Origins: A Programmatic Essay,” in Studies in the History and Text of the New Testament in Honor of Kenneth Willis Clark. Edited by Suggs, Daniel T. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1967, pp. 81–88.Google Scholar
Farmer, William R.Jesus and the Gospel: Tradition, Scripture, and Canon. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982.Google Scholar
Farrell, Thomas J.Kelber's Breakthrough.” Semeia 39 (1987), pp. 27–45.Google Scholar
Fascher, Erich. Die formgeschichtliche Methode: Eine Darstellung und Kritik, Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Synoptischen Problems. Beihefte zur Zeitschrift fur die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 2. Berlin: Alfred Töpelmann, 1924.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fawcett, Thomas. Hebrew Myth and Christian Gospel. London: SCM Press, 1973.Google Scholar
Fee, Gordon D.The Use of the Definite Article with Personal Names in the Gospel of John.” NTS 17 (1970–71), pp. 168–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fee, Gordon D. “P75, P66 and Origen: The Myth of Early Textual Recension in Alexandria,” in New Dimensions in New Testament Study. Edited by Longenecker, Richard and Tenney, Merrill C. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1974, pp. 19–45.Google Scholar
Fee, Gordon D. “On the Text and Meaning of John 20, 30–31,” in The Four Gospels, 1992. 3 vols. Edited by Segbroek, F.et al. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1992, vol. Ⅲ, pp. 2193–205.Google Scholar
Feine, Paul. Theologie des Neuen Testaments. 21st edn. Berlin: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt, 1953.Google Scholar
Ferguson, Everett. “Factors Leading to the Selection and Closure of the New Testament Canon: A Survey of Some Recent Studies,” in The Canon Debate. Edited by McDonald, Lee Martin and Sanders, James A. Peabody: Hendrickson, 2002, pp. 295–320.Google Scholar
Festinger, Leon. A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1957.Google Scholar
Festinger, Leon, Riecken, Henry W, and Schachter, Stanley. When Prophecy Fails: A Social and Psychological Study of a Modern Group That Predicted the Destruction of the World. New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Repr. Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 1964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fewell, Danna Nolan, ed. Reading between Texts: Intertextuality and the Hebrew Bible. Literary Currents in Biblical Interpretation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1992.Google Scholar
Filson, Floyd V.The Significance of Early House Churches.” Journal of Biblical Literature 58 (1939), pp. 105–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finn, T. M.Social Mobility, Imperial Civil Service and the Spread of Early Christianity.” Studia Patristica 17 (1982), pp. 31–37.Google Scholar
Fiorenza, Elizabeth Schüssler, ed. Aspects of Religious Propaganda in Judaism and Early Christianity. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1976.Google Scholar
Fiorenza, Elizabeth Schüssler, In Memory of Her: A Feminist Theological Reconstruction of Christian Origins. London: SCM Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Fiorenza, Elizabeth Schüssler, The Book of Revelation: Justice and Judgment. 2nd edn. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998.Google Scholar
Fischel, Harry. “Studies in Cynicism and the Ancient Near East: The Transformation of a Chria,” in Religions in Antiquity: Essays in Memory of Erwin Ramsdell Goodenough. Edited by Neusner, Jacob. Leiden: Brill, 1968, pp. 372–411.Google Scholar
Fitzmyer, Joseph A.The Gospel According to Luke Ⅰ–Ⅸ. The Anchor Bible 28. New York: Doubleday, 1981.Google Scholar
Flusser, David. Judaism and the Origins of Christianity. Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, the Hebrew University, 1988.Google Scholar
Fodor, James. Christian Hermeneutics: Paul Ricoeur and the Refiguring of Theology. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forkman, Göran. The Limits of the Religious Community: Expulsion from the Religious Community within the Qumran Sect, within Rabbinic Judaism, and within Primitive Christianity. Coniectanea biblica, New Testament Series 5. Lund: Gleerup, 1972.Google Scholar
Fortna, Robert Tomson. The Gospel of Signs: A Reconstruction of the Narrative Source Underlying the Fourth Gospel. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 11. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1970.Google Scholar
Fortna, Robert Tomson. The Fourth Gospel and its Predecessor: From Narrative Source to Present Gospel. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1988.Google Scholar
Fortna, R. T. and Gaventa, B. R., eds. The Conversation Continues: Studies in Paul and John. Nashville: Abingdon, 1990.Google Scholar
Fowl, Stephen E.Engaging Scripture: A Model for Theological Interpretation. Challenges in Contemporary Theology. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998.Google Scholar
Fowler, Alastair. Kinds of Literature: An Introduction to the Theory of Genres and Modes. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Fowler, Robert M. “Who is ‘the Reader’ of Mark's Gospel?” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1983, pp. 31–53.Google Scholar
Fowler, Robert M.Who is ‘the Reader’ in Reader Response Criticism?Semeia 31 (1985), pp. 5–23.Google Scholar
Fowler, Robert M.Let the Reader Understand: Reader-Response Criticism and the Gospel of Mark. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991.Google Scholar
France, R. T.The Formula-Quotations of Matthew 2 and the Problem of Communication.” NTS 27 (1981), pp. 233–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
France, R. T. “Jewish Historiography, Midrash, and the Gospels,” in Gospel Perspectives Ⅲ: Studies in Midrash and Historiography. Edited by France, R. T. and Wenham, David. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1983, pp. 99–127.Google Scholar
France, R. T.Matthew: Evangelist and Teacher. Exeter: Paternoster, 1989.Google Scholar
Freed, Edwin D.Old Testament Quotations in the Gospel of John. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 11. Leiden: Brill, 1965.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freed, Edwin D.Samaritan Influence in the Gospel of JohnCatholic Biblical Quarterly 30 (1968), pp. 580–87.Google Scholar
Freed, Edwin D.Did John Write His Gospel Partly to Win Samaritan Converts?Novum Testamentum 12 (1970), pp. 241–56.Google Scholar
Freedman, Aviva and Medway, Peter. Genre and the New Rhetoric. Critical Perspectives on Literacy and Education. London: Taylor & Francis, 1994.Google Scholar
Frei, Hans W.The Eclipse of Biblical Narrative: A Study in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Hermeneutics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Frei, Hans W.The Identity of Jesus Christ: The Hermeneutical Basis of Dogmatic Theology. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1975.Google Scholar
Frei, Hans W. “The ‘Literal Reading’ of Biblical Narrative in the Christian Tradition: Does it Stretch or Will it Break?,” in The Bible and the Narrative Tradition. Edited by McConnell, Frank. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986, pp. 36–77.Google Scholar
Frend, William H. C.Martyrdom and Persecution in the Early Church: A Study of a Conflict from the Maccabees to Donatus. New York: New York University Press, 1965.Google Scholar
Frend, William H. C.The Rise of Christianity. London: Darton, Longman, & Todd, 1984.Google Scholar
Froehlich, Karlfried, ed. Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church. SECT. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1984.Google Scholar
Frye, Northrop. Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1957.Google Scholar
Fuglseth, Kåre Sigvald. Johannine Sectarianism in Perspective: A Sociological, Historical, and Comparative Analysis of Temple and Social Relationships in the Gospel of John, Philo, and Qumran. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 119. Leiden: Brill, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fuller, Reginald H.The Foundations of New Testament Christology. London: Lutterworth Press, 1965.Google Scholar
Gagé, Jean. Les Classes socials dans l'empire romain. Bibliothèque historique. Paris: Payot, 1964.Google Scholar
Gager, John G.Kingdom and Community: The Social World of Early Christianity. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1975.Google Scholar
Gager, John G.Social Description and Sociological Explanation.” Religious Studies Review 5 (1979), pp. 174–80.Google Scholar
Gager, John G.Shall We Marry our Enemies? Sociology and the New Testament.” Interpretation 36 (1982), pp. 256–65.Google Scholar
Gager, John G. Review of Robert M. Grant, Early Christianity and Society: Seven Studies; Abraham J. Malherbe, Social Aspects of Early Christianity; and Gerd Theissen, Sociology of Early Palestinian Christianity. Religious Studies Review 5 (1979), pp. 174–80.Google Scholar
Gallagher, Eugene V.Divine Man or Magician? Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 64. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1982.Google Scholar
Gamble, Harry Y.Books and Readers in the Early Church: A History of Early Christian Texts. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Alan. Forms of Explanation: Rethinking the Questions of Social Theory. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Geertz, Clifford. The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays. New York: Basic Books, 1973.Google Scholar
Gerhart, Mary. “Generic Studies: Their Renewed Importance in Religious and Literary Interpretation.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 45 (1977), pp. 309–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gerhart, Mary. “Generic Competence in Biblical Hermeneutics.” Semeia 43 (1988), pp. 29–44.Google Scholar
Gese, Hartmut. Essays on Biblical Theology. Translated by Keith Crim. Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1981.Google Scholar
Gill, D. W. J. and Gempf, C., eds. The Book of Acts in Its Graeco-Roman Setting. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994.Google Scholar
Gill, Robin. “Berger's Plausibility Structures: A Response to Professor Cairns.” Scottish Journal of Theology 27 (1974), pp. 198–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gill, Robin. Theology and Social Structure. London: Mowbrays, 1977.Google Scholar
Glasson, T. Francis. Moses in the Fourth Gospel. Studies in Biblical Theology 40. London: SCM Press, 1963.Google Scholar
Glasswell, M. E.St. Matthew's Gospel — History or Book.” Communio Viatorum 24 (1981), pp. 41–45.Google Scholar
Glaue, Paul. Die Vorlesung heiliger Schriften im Gottesdiente. 1 Teil. Bis zur Entstehung der alkatholischen Kirche. Berlin: University of Berlin, 1907.Google Scholar
Gloag, Paton J.Introduction to the Johannine Writings. London: James Nisbet, 1891.Google Scholar
Goetchius, E. V. N. Review of Lane C. McGaughy, Toward a Descriptive Analysis of EINAI as a Linking Verb in New Testament Greek. Journal of Biblical Literature 95 (1976), pp. 147–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goguel, Maurice. The Birth of Christianity. Translated by H. P. Snape. London: Allen & Unwin, 1953.Google Scholar
Goldingay, John. Models for Scripture. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1994.Google Scholar
Goldingay, John. Models for Interpretation of Scripture. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995.Google Scholar
Goode, Erich. “Some Critical Observations on the Church-Sect Dimension.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6 (1967), pp. 69–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goppelt, Leonhard. Typos: The Typological Interpretation of the Old Testament in the New. Translated by Donald H. Madvig. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1982.Google Scholar
Goulder, Michael D.Midrash and Lection in Matthew. London: SPCK, 1974.Google Scholar
Goulder, Michael D.The Evangelist's Calendar: A Lectionary Explanation of the Development of Scripture. London: SPCK, 1978.Google Scholar
Goulder, Michael D.Luke: A New Paradigm. Sheffield: Shefffield Academic Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Goulder, Michael D.The Pre-Markan Gospel.” Scottish Journal of Theology 47 (1994), pp. 453–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graham, Willaim A. “Scripture,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion. Edited by Eliade, Mircea. 16 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1987, vol. Ⅳ, pp. 133–45.Google Scholar
Grant, Robert M.Early Christianity and Society: Seven Studies. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.Google Scholar
Green, Joel B.Scripture and Theology: Failed Experiments, Fresh Perspectives.” Interpretation 56 (2002), pp. 4–20.Google Scholar
Green, Joel B., ed. Hearing the New Testament: Strategies for Interpretation. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995.Google Scholar
Green, Joel B., McKnight, Scot, and Marshall, I. Howard, eds. Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. Downers Grove, Ill.: Intervarsity Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Greene, Kevin. The Archaeology of the Roman Economy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Greene-McCreight, Kathryn E.“Ad Litteram” How Augustine, Calvin, and Barth Read the “Plain Sense” of Genesis 1–3. IST 5. New York: Peter Lang, 1999.Google Scholar
Gregory, C. R.The Reading of Scripture in the Church in the Second Century.” American Journal of Theology 13 (1908), pp. 86–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grüneberg, Keith Nigel. Abraham, Blessing, and the Nations: A Philological and Exegetical Study of Genesis 12:3 in its Narrative Context. Beihefte zur Zeitschrift fur die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft 332. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guilding, Aileen. The Fourth Gospel and Jewish Worship. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1960.Google Scholar
Gundry, Robert H. “Recent Investigations into the Literary Genre ‘Gospel,’” in New Dimensions in New Testament Study. Edited by Longenecker, Richard N and Tenney, Merrill C. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1974, pp. 97–114.Google Scholar
Gundry, Robert H.Jesus the Word According to John the Sectarian: A Paleofundamentalist Manifesto for Contemporary Evangelicalism, especially Its Elites, in North America. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002.Google Scholar
Guelich, Robert. “The Gospel Genre,” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 173–208.Google Scholar
Guijarro, Santiago. “Why Does the Gospel of Mark Begin as It Does?Biblical Theology Bulletin 33 (2003), pp. 28–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gunkel, Hermann. The Legends of Genesis: The Biblical Saga and History. Translated by W. H. Carruth. New York: Schocken Books, 1964.Google Scholar
Gunton, Colin E.A Brief Theology of Revelation: The 1993 Warfield Lectures. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1995.Google Scholar
Gusfield, Joseph R.Community: A Critical Response. Key Concepts in the Social Sciences. Oxford: Blackwell, 1975.Google Scholar
Gutmann, Joseph, ed. Ancient Synagogues: The State of Research. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Güttgemanns, Erhardt. Candid Questions concerning Gospel Form Criticism: A Methodological Sketch of the Fundamental Problematics of Form and Redaction Critics. Translated by William G. Doty. 2nd edn. The Pittsburgh Theological Monograph Series 26. Pittsburgh: Pickwick Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Habermas, Jürgen. The Theory of Communicative Action. Vol. 1. Reason and the Rationalization of Society. Translated by Thomas McCarthy. Boston: Beacon, 1984.Google Scholar
Habermas, Jürgen. Philosophical Discourses of Modernity. Translated by Frederick G. Lawrence. Cambridge: Polity, 1987.Google Scholar
Hadas, Moses and Smith, Morton. Heroes and Gods: Spiritual Biographies in Antiquity. Religious Perspectives Series 13. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1965.Google Scholar
Haenchen, Ernst. “Aus der Literatur zum Johannesevangelium 1929–1956.” Theologische Rundschau 23 (1955), pp. 295–33.Google Scholar
Haenchen, Ernst. “Neuere Literatur zu den Johannesbriefen.” Theologische Rundschau 26 (1960), pp. 1–43, pp. 267–91.Google Scholar
Haenchen, Ernst. “‘Der Vater der mich gesandt hat.’NTS 9 (1963), pp. 208–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haenchen, Ernst. John: A Commentary on the Gospel of John. 2 vols. Translated by Robert W. Funk. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1984.Google Scholar
Hägerland, Tobias. “John's Gospel: A Two-Level Drama?Journal for the Study of the New Testament 25 (2003), pp. 309–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hagner, Donald A.Matthew 1–13. Word Biblical Commentary 33a. Dallas: Word, 1993.Google Scholar
Halliday, Michael A. K.Anti-languages.” American Anthropologist 78 (1976), pp. 570–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, Michael A. K.Language as Social Semiotic: The Social Interpretation of Language and Meaning. Baltimore: University Park, 1978.Google Scholar
Hampson, Norman. The Enlightenment. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1968.Google Scholar
Hanson, K. C. and Oakman, Douglas E. Palestine in the Time of Jesus: Social Structures and Social Conflicts. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998.Google Scholar
Hanson, Paul D.The Dawn of Apocalyptic: The Historical and Sociological Roots of Jewish Apocalyptic Eschatology. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1979.Google Scholar
Hanson, R. P. C.Tradition in the Early Church. London: SCM Press, 1962.Google Scholar
Hanson, R. P. C.Allegory and Event: A Study of the Sources and Significance of Origen's Interpretation of Scripture. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003. Repr. Richmond: John Knox, 1959.Google Scholar
Hare, Douglas R. A.The Theme of Jewish Persecution of Christians in the Gospel According to St. Matthew. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harland, Philip A.Associations, Synagogues, and Congregations: Claiming a Place in Ancient Mediterranean Society. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2003.Google Scholar
Harrington, Daniel J.Sociological Concepts and the Early Church: A Decade of Research.” Theological Studies 41 (1980), pp. 181–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrington, Daniel J.Second Testament Exegesis and the Social Sciences.” Biblical Theology Bulletin 18–19 (1988–89), pp. 77–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, Marvin. The Rise of Anthropological Theory: A History of Theories of Culture. Rev. and enl. edn. Oxford: Altamira Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Harvey, A.The Historian and the Believer: The Morality of Historical Knowledge and Christian Belief. Chicago: University of Illinois, 1966. Repr. New York: Macmillan, 1996.Google Scholar
Hatch, Edwin. The Organization of the Early Christian Churches. 4th edn. Bampton Lectures for 1880. London: Longmans & Green, 1892.Google Scholar
Hatina, Thomas R.Intertextuality and Historical Criticism in New Testament Studies: Is There a Relationship?Biblical Interpretation 7 (1999), pp. 28–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hays, Richard B.Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Hays, Richard B.Can the Gospels Teach us to Read the Old Testament?Pro Ecclesia 11 (2002), pp. 403–18.Google Scholar
Heinrici, Georg C. F.Die Christengemeinde Korinths und die religiösen Genossenschaften der Griechen.” Zeitschrift für Wissenschaftliche Theologie 19 (1876), pp. 464–526.Google Scholar
Heinrici, Georg C. F.Der Zweite Brief an die Korinther. 7th edn. Kritisch-exegetischer Kommentar über das Neue Testament 6. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1890.Google Scholar
Hendriksen, William. Exposition of the Gospel According to John. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1953.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. “Die Synagogeninschrift von Stobi.” ZNW 57 (1966), pp. 145–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hengel, Martin. “Proseuche und Synagoge: Jüdische Gemeinde, Gotteshaus und Gottesdienst in der Diaspora und in Palästina,” in Tradition und Glaube: Das frühe Christentum in seiner Umwelt: Festgabe für Karl Georg Kuhn. Edited by Jeremias, Gert, Heinz-Wolfgang Kuhn, , and Stegemann, Hartmut. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1971, pp. 157–83.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. “Die Ursprünge der christlichen Mission.” NTS 18 (1971), pp. 15–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hengel, Martin. Judaism and Hellenism: Studies in their Encounter in Palestine during the Early Hellenistic Period. Translated by John Bowden. London: SCM Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. Acts and the History of Earliest Christianity. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. Studies in the Gospel of Mark. Translated by John Bowden. London: SCM Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. The Johannine Question. Translated by John Bowden. Philadelphia: Trinity Press International, 1989.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. “Literary, Theological, and Historical Problems in the Gospel of Mark,” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Translated by John Bowden. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 209–51.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. Die Johanneische Frage: Ein Lösungsversuch. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 67. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1993.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. The Four Gospels and the One Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Investigation of the Collection and Origin of the Canonical Gospels. Translated by John Bowden. London: SCM Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Hill, Charles E.The Johannine Corpus in the Early Church. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hilton, Michael and Marshall, Gordian. The Gospels and Rabbinic Judaism. London: SCM Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Hirsch, E. D. Jr.Validity in Interpretation. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Hirsch, E. D. Jr.The Aims of Interpretation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.Google Scholar
Hirsch, E. D. Jr.Meaning and Significance Reinterpreted.” CI 11 (1984), pp. 202–24.Google Scholar
Hobbs, Edward C. “Norman Perrin on Methodology in the Interpretation of Mark,” in Christology and a Modern Pilgrimage: A Discussion with Norman Perrin. Edited by Betz, Hans Dieter. Missoula, Mont.: Society of Biblical Literature, 1974, pp. 53–60.Google Scholar
Hock, Ronald F.The Social Context of Paul's Ministry: Tentmaking and Apostleship. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1980.Google Scholar
Hofrichter, Peter Leander. Für und wider die Priorität des Johannesevangeliums. Theologische Texte und Studien 9. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 2002.Google Scholar
Holladay, Carl R.Theios Aner in Hellenistic Judaism: A Critique. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 40. Missoula, Mont.: Scholars Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Holliday, Michael A. K.Anti-languages.” American Anthropologist 78 (1976), pp. 570–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holliday, Michael A. K.Language as Social Semiotic: The Social Interpretation of Language and Meaning. Baltimore: University Park, 1978.Google Scholar
Holmberg, Bengt. Paul and Power: The Structure of Authority in the Primitive Church as Reflected in the Pauline Epistles. Coniectanea biblica, New Testament Series 11. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1980.Google Scholar
Holmberg, Bengt. Sociology and the New Testament: An Appraisal. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1990.Google Scholar
Holmes, Michael, ed. Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations. Rev. edn. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1999.Google Scholar
Hooker, Morna D.On Using the Wrong Tool.” Theology 75 (1972), pp. 570–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horbury, W.The Benediction of the Minim and the Early Jewish-Christian Controversy.” Journal of Theological Studies 33 (1982), pp. 19–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horsley, Richard A.Popular Prophetic Movements at the Time of Jesus: Their Principle Features and Social Origins.” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 26 (1986), pp. 3–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horsley, Richard A.Sociology and the Jesus Movement. New York: Crossroad, 1989.Google Scholar
Hoskyns, Edwyn C. The Fourth Gospel. Edited by Davey, Frances Noel. London: Faber & Faber, 1940.Google Scholar
Howard-Brook, Wes. Becoming Children of God: John's Gospel and Radical Discipleship. The Bible and Liberation Series. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994.Google Scholar
Huie-Jolly, Mary R. “Threats Answered by Enthronement: Death/Resurrection and the Divine Warrior Myth in John 5.17–29, Psalm 2 and Daniel 7,” in Studies in Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity: Investigations and Proposals. Edited by Evans, Craig A and Sanders, James A. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 148. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997, pp. 191–217.Google Scholar
Hunsinger, George and Placher, William C, ed. Theology and Narrative: Selected Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Hurtado, Larry W.Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003.Google Scholar
Ibuki, Yu, “‘Viele glaubten an ihn’ — Auseinandersetzung mit dem Glauben im Johannesevangelium.” Annual of the Japanese Biblical Institute 9 (1983), pp. 128–83.Google Scholar
Instone-Brewer, David. “The Eighteen Benedictions and the Minim before 70 CE.” Journal of Theological Studies 54 (2003), pp. 25–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Isenberg, Sheldon R.Millenarianism in Greco-Roman Palestine.” Religion 4 (1974), pp. 26–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Iser, Wolfgang. The Implied Reader: Patterns of Communication in Prose Fiction from Bunyan to Beckett. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Iser, Wolfgang. The Act of Reading: A Theory of Asthetic Response. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978.Google Scholar
Iser, Wolfgang. “Interaction between Text and Reader,” in The Reader in the Text: Essays on Audience and Interpretation. Edited by Suleiman, Susan R and Crosman, Inge. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980, pp. 106–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jacobson-Widding, Anita, ed. Identity: Personal and Socio-Cultural: A Symposium. Stockholm: Almquist & Wiskell, 1983.Google Scholar
Jarvie, Ian Charles. The Revolution in Anthropology. Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1967.Google Scholar
Jensen, Alexander S.John's Gospel as Witness: The Development of the Early Christian Language of Faith. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.Google Scholar
Jeremias, Joachim. The Parables of Jesus. Translated by S. H. Hooke. London: SCM Press, 1954.Google Scholar
Jeremias, Joachim. Jerusalem in the Time of Jesus. Translated by F. H. Cave and C. H. Cave. London: SCM Press, 1969.Google Scholar
Jewett, Robert. The Thessalonian Correspondence: Pauline Rhetoric and Millenarian Piety. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1986.Google Scholar
Johnson, Benton. “On Church and Sect.” American Sociological Review 28 (1963), pp. 539–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Luke Timothy. “On Finding the Lukan Community: A Cautious Cautionary Essay,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1979, pp. 87–100.Google Scholar
Johnson, Luke Timothy. The Writings of the New Testament: An Interpretation. Rev. edn. London: SCM Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Jonge, Henk Jan de. “‘The ‘Jews’ in the Gospel of John,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 121–40.Google Scholar
Jonge, Marinus. “Nicodemus and Jesus: Some Observations on Misunderstanding and Understanding in the Fourth Gospel.” BJTL 53 (1971), pp. 337–59.Google Scholar
Jonge, Marinus de. “Christology, Controversy, and Community in the Gospel of John,” in Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole. Edited by Horrell, David G and Tuckett, Christopher M. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 99. Leiden: Brill, 2000, pp. 209–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jonge, Marinus, ed. L'Evangile de Jean: Sources, rédaction, théologie. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 44. Gembloux: Duculot, 1977.Google Scholar
Judge, Edwin A.The Social Pattern of Early Christian Groups in the First Century: Some Prolegomena to the Study of New Testament Ideas of Social Obligation. London: Tyndale, 1960.Google Scholar
Judge, Edwin A.The Early Christians as a Scholastic Community,” Journal of Religious History 1 (1960), pp. 4–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Judge, Edwin A.The Early Christians as a Scholastic Community: Part Ⅱ,” Journal of Religious History 1 (1960), pp. 125–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Judge, Edwin A.The Social Identity of the First Christians: A Question of Method in Religious History.” Journal of Religious History 11 (1980), pp. 201–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Judge, Edwin A.Rank and Status in the World of Caesars and St. Paul. Christchurch: University of Canterbury, 1982.Google Scholar
Käsemann, Ernst. The Testament of Jesus: A Study of the Gospel of John in Light of Chapter 17. Translated by Gerhard Krodel. London: SCM Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Käsemann, Ernst. “The Beginnings of Christian Theology,” in New Testament Quotations of Today. Edited by Käsemann, Ernst. London: SCM Press, 1969, pp. 82–107.Google Scholar
Katz, Steven T.Issues in the Separation of Judaism and Christianity After 70 CE: A Reconsideration.” Journal of Biblical Literature 103 (1984), pp. 43–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kazen, Thomas. “Sectarian Gospels for Some Christians? Intention and Mirror Reading in the Light of Extra-Canonical Texts.” NTS 51 (2005), pp. 561–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kea, Perry V. “Writing a bios: Matthew's Genre Choices and Rhetorical Situation,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1994, pp. 574–86.Google Scholar
Keck, Leander E.Mark 3:7–12 and Mark's Christology.” Journal of Biblical Literature 84 (1965), pp. 341–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keck, Leander E.On the Ethos of Early Christians.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 42 (1974), pp. 435–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. “Aretalogy and Gospel.” Journal of Biblical Literature 92 (1973), pp. 402–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. Community of the New Age: Studies in Mark's Gospel. London: SCM Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. Jesus in History: An Approach to the Study of the Gospels. 2nd edn. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1977.Google Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. Christian Origins in Sociological Perspective. London: SCM Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. Knowing the Truth: A Sociological Approach to New Testament Interpretation. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1989.Google Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. “Synoptic Studies,” in The New Testament and its Modern Interpreters. Edited by Epp, Eldon Jay and MacRae, George W. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1989, pp. 245–89.Google Scholar
Kee, Howard Clark. Who are the People of God? Early Christian Models of Community. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Keener, Craig S.The Gospel of John: A Commentary. 2 vols. Peabody: Hendrickson, 2003.Google Scholar
Kelber, Werner H.The Kingdom in Mark: A New Place and a New Time. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1974.Google Scholar
Kelber, Werner H.Mark's Story of Jesus. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Kelber, Werner H.The Oral and the Written Gospel: The Hermeneutics of Speaking and Writing in the Synoptic Tradition, Mark, Paul, and Q. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982.Google Scholar
Kelber, Werner H.Narrative as Interpretation and Interpretation of Narrative: Hermeneutical Reflections on the Gospels.” Semeia 39 (1987), pp. 107–33.Google Scholar
Kennedy, George A.New Testament Interpretation through Rhetorical Criticism. SR. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kermode, Frank. The Genesis of Secrecy: On the Interpretation of Narrative. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Kilpatrick, G. D.The Origins of the Gospel According to St. Matthew. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1946.
Kimmelman, Reuven. “Birkat Ha-Minim and the Lack of Evidence for an Anti-Christian Jewish Prayer in Late Antiquity,” in Aspects of Judaism in the Graeco-Roman Period. Edited by Sanders, E. P. and Baumgarten, A. I.. London: SCM Press, 1981, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 226–44.Google Scholar
King, K.Kingdom in the Gospel of Thomas.” Foundations and Facets Forum 3 (1987), pp. 48–97.Google Scholar
Kingsbury, Jack Dean. Matthew as Story. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1986.Google Scholar
Kingsbury, Jack Dean. “Reflections on ‘The Reader’ in Matthew's Gospel.” NTS 34 (1988), pp. 442–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kingsbury, Jack Dean. “Conclusion: Analysis of a Conversation,” in Social History of the Matthean Community: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches. Edited by Balch, David L. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1991, pp. 259–69.Google Scholar
Kippenberg, Hans G. “Ein Vergleich jüdischer, christlicher und gnostischer Apokalyptik,” in Apocalypticism in the Mediterranean World and the Near East: Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Apocalypticism: Uppsala: August 12–17, 1979. Edited by Hellholm, David. Tübingen: Mohr, 1983, pp. 751–68.Google Scholar
Kirk, Alan. “The Johannine Jesus in the Gospel of Peter: A Social Memory Approach,” in Jesus in Johannine Tradition. Edited by Fortna, Robert T and Thatcher, Tom. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 313–21.Google Scholar
Klauck, Hans-Joseph. Hausgemeinde und Hauskirche im Frühen Christentum. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 1981.Google Scholar
Klauck, Hans-Joseph. “Die Hausgemeinde als Lebensform im Urchristentum.” Münchener Theologische Zeitschrift 32 (1981), pp. 1–15.Google Scholar
Klauck, Hans-Joseph. “Community, History, and Text(s) — a Response.” Paper presented at Life in Abundance: An International Conference on the Gospel of John: A Tribute to Raymond E. Brown. Baltimore, October 16–18, 2003.
Klijn, A. F. J.Jewish-Christian Gospel Tradition. Supplements to Vigiliae Christianae: Texts and Studies of Early Christian Life and Language 17. Leiden: Brill, 1992.Google Scholar
Kline, Meredith G.The Old Testament Origins of the Gospel Genre.” WTJ 38 (1975), pp. 1–27.Google Scholar
Klink, Edward W. . “The Gospel Community Debate: State of the Question.” Currents in Biblical Research 3.1 (2004), pp. 60–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kloppenborg, John S.The Formation of Q: Trajectories in Ancient Wisdom Collections. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1987.Google Scholar
Knierim, Rolf. “Old Testament Form Criticism Reconsidered.” Interpretation 27 (1973), pp. 435–68.Google Scholar
Knight, Douglas A. “The Understanding of ‘Sitz im Leben’ in Form Criticism,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1973, pp. 105–25.Google Scholar
Koehler, Ludwig. Das formgeschichtliche Problem des Neuen Testaments. Leiden: Brill, 1924.Google Scholar
Koch, Klaus. The Growth of the Biblical Tradition: The Form-Critical Method. Translated by S. M. Cupitt. London: Adam and Charles Black, 1969.Google Scholar
Koester, Craig R.Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel: Meaning, Mystery, Community. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1995.Google Scholar
Koester, Craig R. “The Spectrum of Johannine Readers,” in “What is John?” Readers and Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 3. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1996, pp. 5–19.Google Scholar
Koester, Helmut. “One Jesus and Four Primitive Gospels,” in Trajectories through Early Christianity. Edited by Robinson, James M and Koester, Helmut. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1971, pp. 158–204.Google Scholar
Koester, Helmut. Introduction to the New Testament: History and Literature of Early Christianity. 2 vols. Translated by Walter de Gruyter. Hermenia: Foundations and Facets. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982.Google Scholar
Koester, Helmut. Ancient Christian Gospels. London: SCM Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Köstenberger, Andreas J.The Missions of Jesus and The Disciples According to the Fourth Gospel: With Implications for the Fourth Gospel's Purpose and the Mission of the Contemporary Church. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998.Google Scholar
Kraeling, Carl H.The Christian Building. The Excavations at Dura-Europos: Final Reports. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967, vol. Ⅷ, pt. 2.Google Scholar
Kraft, Heinrich. “Die Evangelien und die Geschichte Jesu.” Theologische Zeitschrift 37 (1981), pp. 321–41.Google Scholar
Kreissig, Heinz. “Zur sozialen Zusammensetzung der frühchristlichen Gemeinde im ersten Jahrhundert u. Z.” Eirene: Studia Graeca at Latina 6 (1967), pp. 91–100.Google Scholar
Kristeva, Julia. Semiotiké: recherches pour une sémanalyse: extraits. Paris: Seuil, 1969.Google Scholar
Kristeva, Julia. La Révolution du langage poétique: l'avant-garde à la fin du ⅩⅨe siècle: Lautréamont et Mallarmé. Paris: Seuil, 1974.Google Scholar
Kügler, Joachim. “Das Johannesevangelium und seine Gemeinde — kein Thema für Science Fiction.” Biblische Notizen 23 (1984), pp. 48–62.Google Scholar
Kuhn, Karl Gustav. “Das Problem der Mission in der Urchristenheit.” Evangelische Missions-Zeitschrift 11 (1954), pp. 167–68.Google Scholar
Kuhn, Thomas S.The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. 2nd and enl. edn. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1970.Google Scholar
Kümmel, Werner G.The New Testament: The History of the Investigation of its Problems. Translated by S. McClean Gilmour and Howard C. Kee. London: SCM Press, 1973.Google Scholar
Kümmel, Werner G.Introduction to the New Testament. Translated by Howard C. Kee Nashville: Abingdon, 1975.Google Scholar
Kurz, William S. “Intertextual Permutations of the Genesis Word in the Johannine Prologues,” in Studies in Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity: Investigations and Proposals. Edited by Evans, Craig A and Sanders, James A. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 148. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997, pp. 179–90.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. The Fourth Evangelist and His Gospel. Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1975.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. John, The Maverick Gospel. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1976.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. “Community and Gospel: Vectors in Fourth Gospel Criticism.” Interpretation 31 (1977), pp. 355–66.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. “The Gospel of John in Current Research.” Religious Studies Review 9 (1983), pp. 314–23.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. John's Story of Jesus. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1984.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. “Coming Hermeneutical Earthquake in Johannine Interpretation,” in “What is John?” Readers and Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 3. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1996, pp. 185–89.Google Scholar
Kysar, Robert. “The Expulsion from the Synagogue: A Tale of a Theory.” Paper Delivered at the annual meeting of the SBL. Toronto, Canada, November 25, 2002.
Kysar, Robert. “The Whence and Whither of the Johannine Community.” Paper Delivered at Life in Abundance: An International Conference on the Gospel of John: A Tribute to Raymond E. Brown. Baltimore, October 18, 2003.
Kysar, Robert. “The Whence and Whither of the Johannine Community,” in Life in Abundance: Studies of John's Gospel in Tribute to Raymond E. Brown. Edited by Donahue, John R. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2005, pp. 65–81.Google Scholar
Lampe, G. W. H.A Patristic Greek Lexicon. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1961.Google Scholar
Langbrandtner, Wolfgang. Weltferner Gott oder Liebe: Der Ketzerstreit in der johanneischen Kirche. Beiträge zur biblischen Exegese und Theologie 6. Frankfurt: Lang, 1977.Google Scholar
Bernard, Lategan C. and Vorster, Willem S. Text and Reality: Aspects of Reference in Biblical Texts. Society of Biblical Literature Semeia Studies. Philadelphia: Fortress Press/Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1985.Google Scholar
LaVerdiere, E. A. and Thompson, W. G.. “New Testament Communities in Transition: A Study in Matthew and Luke.” TS 37 (1976), pp. 567–79.Google Scholar
Lee, David. Luke's Stories of Jesus: Theological Reading of Gospel Narrative and the Legacy of Hans Frei. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 185. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Lee, Dorothy A.The Symbolic Narratives of the Fourth Gospel: The Interplay of Form and Meaning. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 95. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Lemcio, Eugene E.The Past of Jesus in the Gospels. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 68. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lenski, Gerhard. Power and Privilege: A Theory of Social Stratification. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Lenski, Gerhard and Lenski, Jean. Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology. 5th edn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1987.Google Scholar
Léon-Dufour, Xavier. “Towards a Symbolic Reading of the Fourth Gospel.” NTS 27 (1981), pp. 439–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leroy, Herbert. Rätsel und Missverständnis: Ein Beitrag zur Formgeschichte des Johannesevangelium. Bonner biblische Beitr age 30. Bonn: Hanstein, 1966.Google Scholar
Leroy, Herbert. “Das johanneische Missverständnis als literarische Form.” Bibel und Leben 9 (1968), pp. 196–207.Google Scholar
Levine, Lee I., ed. The Synagogue in Late Antiquity. Philadelphia: American Schools of Oriental Research, 1987.Google Scholar
Lewis, I. M.Ecstatic Religion: An Anthropological Study of Spirit Possession and Shamanism. London: Penguin Books, 1971.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liddell, Henry George. and Scott, Robert. A Greek-English Lexicon. Rev. by H. Stuart Jones. 9th edn. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Lieu, Judith M.The Second and Third Epistles of John: History and Background. Studies of the New Testament and Its World. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1986.Google Scholar
Lieu, Judith M. “Anti-Judaism in the Fourth Gospel: Explanation and Hermeneutics,” in Anti- Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 101–17.Google Scholar
Lieu, Judith M.Neither Jew Nor Greek? Constructing Early Christianity. Studies of the New Testament and Its World. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 2002.Google Scholar
Lightfoot, Robert H.History and Interpretation in the Gospels. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1934.Google Scholar
Lincoln, Andrew T.Truth on Trial: The Lawsuit Motif in the Fourth Gospel. Peabody: Hendrickson, 2000.Google Scholar
Lincoln, Andrew T.The Beloved Disciple as Eyewitness and the Fourth Gospel as Witness.” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 85 (2002), pp. 3–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lincoln, Bruce. “Thomas-Gospel and Thomas-Community: A New Approach to a Familiar Text.” Novum Testamentum 19 (1977), pp. 65–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lincoln, Bruce. Discourse and the Construction of Society: Comparative Studies of Myth, Ritual, and Classification. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Lindars, Barnabas. Behind the Fourth Gospel. Studies in Creative Criticism 3. London: SPCK, 1971.Google Scholar
Lindars, Barnabas. The Gospel of John. Century Bible. London: Oliphants, 1972.Google Scholar
Lindars, Barnabas. “The Persecution of Christians in John 15:18–16:4a,” in Suffering and Martyrdom in the New Testament. Edited by Horbury, William and McNeil, Brian. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981, pp. 48–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindars, Barnabas. John. New Testament Guides. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Llewelyn, G. R. and Kearsley, R. A., eds. “Letter-Carriers in the Early Church,” in New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity. Sydney: Macquarie University Press, 1994, vol. Ⅶ, pp. 50–57.Google Scholar
Lohfink, Gerhard. Jesus and Community: The Social Dimension of Christian Faith. Translated by John P. Galvin. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1984.Google Scholar
Loisy, Alfred. Le quatrième évangile. Paris: Picard, 1903.Google Scholar
Louth, Andrew. “Return to Allegory,” in Discerning the Mystery: An Essay on the Nature of Theology. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983, 96–131.Google Scholar
Lubac, Henri. “Spiritual Understanding,” in The Theological Interpretation of Scripture: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell, 1997, pp. 3–25.Google Scholar
Lührmann, Dieter. “Biographie des Gerechten als Evangelium.” Wort und Dienst 14 (1977), pp. 23–50.Google Scholar
Luomanen, Petri. “The ‘Sociology of Sectarianism’ in Matthew: Modeling the Genesis of Early Judaism and Christian Communities,” in Fair Play: Diversity and Conflicts in Early Christianity: Essays in Honor of Heikki Räisänen. Edited by Dunderberg, Ismo, Tuckett, Christopher, and Syreeni, Kari. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 103. Leiden: Brill, 2002, pp. 107–30.Google Scholar
Luthardt, Christopher Ernst. Der johanneische Ursprung des vierten Evangeliums. Leipzig: Dörffling und Franke, 1874.Google Scholar
Luthardt, Christopher Ernst. St. John the Author of the Fourth Gospel. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1875.Google Scholar
Luthardt, Christopher Ernst. St. John's Gospel Described and Explained According to its Peculiar Character. Translated by Caspar René Gregory. Clark's Foreign Theological Library 3. 3 vols. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1876–78.Google Scholar
Luz, Ulrich. Matthew 1–7. Translated by W. C. Linss. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1989.Google Scholar
Luz, Ulrich. “Fiktivität und Traditionstreue im Matthäusevangelium im Lichte griechischer Literatur.” ZNW 84 (1993), pp. 153–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Luz, Ulrich. The Theology of the Gospel of Matthew. Translated by J. Bradford Robinson. New Testament Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacDonald, Margaret Y.The Pauline Churches: A Socio-historical Study of Institutionalization in the Pauline and Deutero-Pauline Writings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacDonald, Neil B. “Illocutionary Stance in Hans Frei's The Eclipse of Biblical Narrative: An Exercise in Conceptual Redescription and Normative Analysis,” in After Pentecost: Language and Biblical Interpretation. The Scripture and Hermeneutics Series 2. Edited by Bartholomew, Craig, Greene, Colin, and Möller, Karl. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2001, pp. 312–28.Google Scholar
Mack, Burton L.The Myth of Innocence: Mark and Christian Origins. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Mack, Burton L. “Social Formation,” in Guide to the Study of Religion. Edited by Braun, Willie and McCutcheon, Russell T. London: Cassell, 2000, pp. 283–96.Google Scholar
MacMullen, Ramsey. Roman Social Relations 50 B.C. to A.D. 284. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
MacMullen, Ramsey. Paganism in the Roman Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
MacRae, George W.The Fourth Gospel and Religionsgeschichte.” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 32 (1970), pp. 13–24.Google Scholar
Malatesta, Edward, ed. St. John's Gospel, 1920–1965: A Cumulative and Classified Bibliography of Books and Periodical Literature on the Fourth Gospel. Rome: Pontifical Biblical Institute, 1967.Google Scholar
Malherbe, Abraham J.Social Aspects of Early Christianity. 2nd and enl. edn. Rockwell Lectures of 1975. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1983.Google Scholar
Malina, Bruce J.The Gospel of John in Sociolinguistic Perspective. Berkeley: Center for Hermeneutical Studies in Hellenistic and Modern Culture, 1985.Google Scholar
Malina, Bruce J. Review of Wayne A. Meeks, The First Urban Christians: The Social World of the Apostle Paul. Journal of Biblical Literature 104 (1985), pp. 346–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malina, Bruce J.Normative Dissonance and Christian Origins.” Semeia 35 (1986), pp. 35–59.Google Scholar
Malina, Bruce J. “Reading Theory Perspective: Reading Luke-Acts,” in The Social World of Luke-Acts: Models for Interpretation. Edited by Neyrey, Jerome H. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1991, pp. 3–23.Google Scholar
Malina, Bruce J.The New Testament World: Insights from Social Anthropology. Rev. and enl. edn. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1993.Google Scholar
Malina, Bruce J.John's: The Maverick Christian Group: The Evidence of Sociolinguistics.” Biblical Theology Bulletin 24 (1994), pp. 167–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malina, Bruce J. and Rohrbaugh, Richard L. Social-Science Commentary on the Gospel of John. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1998.Google Scholar
Mannheim, Karl. Ideology and Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge. Translated by Louis Wirth and Edward Shils. London: Routledge & Kegan, 1960.Google Scholar
Manns, Frédéric. John and Jamnia: How the Break Occurred Between Jews and Christians c. 80–100 A.D.Jerusalem: Franciscan Printing, 1988.Google Scholar
Marcus, Joel. Mark 1–8. AB 27. New York: Doubleday, 2000.Google Scholar
Martin, Francis, ed. Narrative Parallels to the New Testament. Society of Biblical Literature Resources for Biblical Study 22. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Martyn, J. Louis. “Source Criticism and Religionsgeschichte in the Fourth Gospel.” Perspective 1 (1970), pp. 247–73.Google Scholar
Martyn, J. Louis. “Glimpses into the History of the Johannine Community,” in L'Evangile de Jean: Sources, rédaction, théologie. Edited by Jonge, Marinus. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 44. Gembloux: Duculot, 1977, pp. 259–99. Repr. in History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel. 3rd edn. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003, pp. 145–67.Google Scholar
Martyn, J. Louis. The Gospel of John in Christian History: Essays for Interpreters. New York: Paulist, 1978.Google Scholar
Martyn, J. Louis. “A Gentile Mission That Replaced an Earlier Jewish Mission?,” in Exploring the Gospel of John: In Honor of D. Moody Smith. Edited by Culpepper, R. Alan and Black, C. Clifton. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996, pp. 124–44.Google Scholar
Martyn, J. Louis. History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel. 3rd edn. The New Testament Library. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2003.Google Scholar
Marshall, I. Howard. “Luke and His ‘Gospel,’” in The Gospel and The Gospels. Edited by Stuhlmacher, Peter. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1991, pp. 273–92.Google Scholar
Marxsen, Willi. Mark the Evangelist: Studies on the Redaction History of the Gospel. Translated by James Boyce, Donald Juel, and William Poehlamnn. Nashville: Abingdon, 1969.Google Scholar
Mason, Arthur J. “Conceptions of the Church in Early Times,” in Essays on the Early History of the Church and the Ministry. 2nd edn. Edited by Swete, H. B.. London: Macmillan, 1921, pp. 3–56.Google Scholar
Matson, Mark A. “Interactive Rhetoric in Matthew: An Exploration of Audience Knowledge Competency. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SBL. Atlanta, November 22, 2003.
Matsunaga, Kikuo. “The Galileans in the Fourth Gospel.” Annual of the Japanese Biblical Institute 2 (1976), pp. 139–58.Google Scholar
Matsunaga, Kikuo. “Is John's Gospel Anti-Sacramental? A New Solution in Light of the Evangelist's Milieu.” NTS 27 (1981), pp. 516–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mattill, Andrew J.Johannine Communities behind the Fourth Gospel: Georg Richter's Analysis.” TS 38 (1977), pp. 294–315.Google Scholar
McCasland, S. Vernon. “Travel and Communication in the NT,” in The Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible. Edited by Buttrick, G. A.. Nashville: Abingdon, 1962–77, vol. Ⅳ, pp. 690–93.Google Scholar
McDonald, Lee M.The Formation of the Christian Biblical Canon. Rev. and enl. edn. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1995.Google Scholar
McGaughy, Lane C.Toward a Descriptive Analysis of EINAI as a Linking Verb in New Testament Greek. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 6. Missoula, Mont.: Society of Biblical Literature, 1972.Google Scholar
McGrath, Alister E.Christian Theology: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell, 1994.Google Scholar
McGuire, Meredith B.Religion: The Social Context. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 1981.Google Scholar
McHugh, John. “In Him was Life,” in Jews and Christians: The Parting of the Ways, A.D. 70 to 135: The Second Durham-Tübingen Research Symposium on Earliest Christianity and Judaism. Edited by Dunn, James D. G.. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1992, pp. 123–58.Google Scholar
McKnight, Edgar V.What is Form Criticism? Guides to Biblical Scholarship New Testament Series. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1969.Google Scholar
McKnight, Scot and Williams, Matthew C. The Synoptic Gospels: An Annotated Bibliography. Institute for Biblical Research Bibliographies 6. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2000.Google Scholar
McPolin, James. “Mission in the Fourth Gospel.” Irish Theological Quarterly 36 (1969), pp. 113–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meier, John P. “Matthew, Gospel of,” in The Anchor Bible Dictionary. Edited by Freedman, David Noel. 6 vols. New York: Doubleday, 1992, vol. Ⅳ, pp. 622–41.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.The Prophet-King: Moses Traditions and the Johannine Christology. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 14. Leiden: Brill, 1967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.The Man From Heaven in Johannine Sectarianism.” Journal of Biblical Literature 91 (1972), pp. 44–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.The Social Context of Pauline Theology.” Interpretation 36 (1982), pp. 266–77.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A. “Social Functions of Apocalyptic Language in Pauline Christianity,” in Apocalypticism in the Mediterranean World and the Near East: Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Apocalypticism: Uppsala: August 12–17, 1979. Edited by Hellholm, David. Tübingen: Mohr, 1983, pp. 687–706.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.The First Urban Christians: The Social World of the Apostle Paul. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A. “Breaking Away: Three New Testament Pictures of Christianity's Separation from the Jewish Communities,” in “To See Ourselves as Others See Us”: Christians, Jews, “Others” in Late Antiquity. Edited by Neusner, Jacob and Frerichs, Ernest S. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1985, pp. 93–115.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.A Hermeneutics of Social Embodiment.” Harvard Theological Review 79 (1986), pp. 176–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A.The Moral World of the First Christians. LEC 6. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1986.Google Scholar
Mercer, Calvin. “APOSTELLEIN and PEMPEIN in John.” NTS 36 (1990), pp. 619–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Messick, David M. and Mackie, Diane M. “Intergroup Relations.” Annual Review of Psychology 40 (1989), pp. 45–81.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Metzger, Bruce M.The Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Metzger, Bruce M.A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament. 2nd edn. New York: American Bible Society, 1994.Google Scholar
Meyer, B. F. “Objectivity and Subjectivity in Historical Criticism of the Gospels,” in The Interrelations of the Gospels. Edited Dungan, David L. Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium 95. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1990, pp. 546–65.Google Scholar
Miller, Donald E.Sectarianism and Secularization: The Work of Bryan Wilson.” Religious Studies Review 5 (1979), pp. 161–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, Edward L.Salvation-History in the Prologue of John: The Significance of John 1:3/4. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 60. Leiden: Brill, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, Edward L.The Johannine Origins of the Johannine Logos.” Journal of Biblical Literature 112 (1993), pp. 445–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Minear, Paul S.The Audience of the Fourth Gospel.” Interpretation 31 (1977), pp. 339–54.Google Scholar
Minear, Paul S.The Beloved Disciple in the Gospel of John: Some Clues and Conjectures,” Novum Testamentum 19 (1977), pp. 105–23.Google Scholar
Minear, Paul S.The Original Functions of John 21.” Journal of Biblical Literature 102 (1983), pp. 85–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Minor, Earl, ed. Literary Uses of Typology: From the Late Middle Ages to the Present. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Margaret M. “Patristic Counter-evidence to the Claim that the ‘Gospels Were Written for All Christians.’” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SBL. Atlanta, November 22, 2003.
Mitchell, Margaret M.Patristic Counter-Evidence to the Claim that the ‘Gospels Were Written for All Christians.’NTS 51 (2005), pp. 36–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mlakuzhyil, George. The Christocentric Literary Structure of the Fourth Gospel. Analecta Biblica 117. Rome: Editrice Pontificio Istituto Biblico, 1987.Google Scholar
Moberly, R. W. L.The Bible, Theology, and Faith: A Study of Abraham and Jesus. Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moessner, David P.One Again Again, What Sort of ‘Essence?’ A Response to Charles Talbert.” Semeia 43 (1988), pp. 75–84.Google Scholar
Moffatt, James. An Introduction to the Literature of the New Testament. 3rd edn. ITL. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1918.Google Scholar
Mol, Hans. Identity and the Sacred: A Sketch for a New Social-Scientific Theory of Religion. Oxford: Blackwell, 1976.Google Scholar
Moloney, Francis J. “From Cana to Cana (John 2:1–4:54) and the Fourth Evangelist's Concept of Correct (and Incorrect) Faith,” in Studia Biblica 1978: Ⅱ: Papers on the Gospels. Edited by Livingston, E. A.. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 2. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1980, pp. 185–213.Google Scholar
Moloney, Francis J. “The Function of John 13–17 within the Johannine Narrative,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 43–66.Google Scholar
Moo, Douglas J.The Old Testament in the Gospel Passion Narratives. Sheffield: Almond Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Moore, George Foot. Judaism in the First Centuries of the Christian Era: The Age of the Tannaim. 3 vols. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1927.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moore, Stephen D.Literary Criticism and the Gospels: The Theoretical Challenge. New Haven; Yale University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Morgan, Robert with Barton, John. Biblical Interpretation. Oxford Bible Series. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, Leon. The Gospel According to John. The New International Commentary on the New Testament. London: Marshall, Morgan & Scott, 1972.Google Scholar
Morris, Leon. “The Gospels and the Jewish Lectionaries,” in Gospel Perspectives Ⅲ: Studies in Midrash and Historiography. Edited by France, R. T. and Wenham, David. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1983, pp. 129–56.Google Scholar
Motyer, Stephen. Your Father the Devil? A New Approach to John and ‘the Jews.’ Paternoster Biblical and Theological Studies. Carlisle: Paternoster, 1997.Google Scholar
Motyer, Stephen. “Method in Fourth Gospel Studies: A Way Out of the Impasse?Journal for the Study of the New Testament 66 (1997), pp. 27–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Motyer, Stephen. “The Fourth Gospel and the Salvation of Israel: An Appeal for a New Start,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 83–100.Google Scholar
Moule, C. F. D.The Individualism of the Fourth Gospel.” Novum Testamentum 5 (1962), pp. 171–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moule, C. F. D.The Phenomenon of the New Testament: An Enquiry into the Implications of Certain Features of the New Testament. Studies in Biblical Theology 2/1. London: SCM Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Moule, C. F. D.The Birth of the New Testament. 3rd edn. London: Continuum, 2002.Google Scholar
Moulton, J. H. and Milligan, G.. Vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1997.Google Scholar
Moxnes, Halvor. “What is Family? Problems in Constructing Early Christian Families,” in Constructing Early Christian Families. Edited by Moxnes, Halvor. London: Routledge, 1997, pp. 13–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moxnes, Halvor. “The Social Context of Luke's Community.” Interpretation 48 (1999), pp. 379–89.Google Scholar
Moyise, Steven. “Intertextuality and the Study of the Old Testament in the New,” in The Old Testament in the New. Essays in Honor of J. L. North. Edited by Moyise, Steven. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 189. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000, pp. 14–41.Google Scholar
Moyise, Steven. The Old Testament in the New: An Introduction. The Continuum Biblical Studies Series. London: Continuum, 2001.Google Scholar
Müller, Ulrich B.Die Geschichte der Christologie in der johanneischen Gemeinde. SB 77. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 1975.Google Scholar
Murphy-O'Connor, J.St. Paul's Corinth. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical, 1983.Google Scholar
Myers, Ched. Binding the Strong Man: A Political Reading of Mark's Story of JesusMaryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1988.Google Scholar
Neale, D.Was Jesus a Mesith? Public Response to Jesus and his Ministry.” Tyndale Bulletin 44.1 (1993), pp. 89–101.Google Scholar
Neibuhr, H. Richard. The Meaning of Revelation. New York: Macmillan, 1960.Google Scholar
Neill, Stephen and Wright, N. T.. The Interpretation of the New Testament, 1861–1986. 2nd edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Nereparampil, Lucius. Destroy This Temple. Bangladore: Dharmaran, 1978.Google Scholar
Netting, Robert M., Wilk, R. R., and Arnould, E. J.. Households: Comparative and Historical Studies of the Domestic Group. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Neyrey, Jerome H.John Ⅲ: A Debate Over Johannine Epistemology and Christology.” Novum Testamentum 23 (1981), pp. 115–27.Google Scholar
Neyrey, Jerome H.An Ideology of Revolt: John's Christology in Social-Science Perspective. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1988.Google Scholar
Neyrey, Jerome H. “The Sociology of Secrecy and the Fourth Gospel,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 79–9.Google Scholar
Neyrey, Jerome H.Review of Richard Burridge, What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography. Catholic Biblical Quarterly 55 (1993), pp. 361–63.Google Scholar
Nicholas, Michel. Études critiques sur la Bible: Noveau Testament. Paris: Michel Lévy Frères, 1864.Google Scholar
Nicholson, Godfrey C.Death as Departure: The Johannine Descent-Ascent Schema. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 63. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Nicol, Willem. The Semeia in the Fourth Gospel: Tradition and Redaction. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 32. Leiden: Brill, 1972.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nock, Arthur Darby. “The Historical Importance of Cult Associations.” Classical Review 38 (1924), pp. 105–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norden, Eduard. Die antike Kuntstprosa: vom Ⅳ. Jahrhundert v. Chr. Bis in die Zeit der Renaissance. Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1898.Google Scholar
O'Day, Gail R.Revelation in the Fourth Gospel: Narrative Mode and Theological Claim. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1986.Google Scholar
O'Day, Gail, R. “The Word Become Flesh: Story and Theology in the Gospel of John,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 67–76.Google Scholar
O'Day, Gail, R. “Response: ‘The Expulsion from the Synagogue: A Tale of a Theory.’” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SBL. Toronto, Canada, November 25, 2002.
Oehler, Wilhelm. Das Johannesevangelium, eine Missionsschrift für die Welt, der Gemeinde ausgelegt. Gütersloh: Bertelsmann, 1936.Google Scholar
Oehler, Wilhelm. Zum Missionscharakter des Johannesevangeliums. Gütersloh: Bertelsmann, 1941.Google Scholar
Oehler, Wilhelm. Das Johannesevangelium, eine Missionsschrift für die Welt. 3 vols. Württemberg: Buchhandlung der Evangelischen Missionsschule Unterweissach, 1957.Google Scholar
Oepke, Albrecht. “Das missionarische Christuszeugnis des Johannesevangeliums.” Evangelische Missions-Zeitschrift 2 (1941), pp. 4–26.Google Scholar
Okure, Teresa. The Johannine Approach to Mission: A Contextual Study of John 4:1–42. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2. Reihe 31. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr, 1998.Google Scholar
Olhausen, William. “A ‘Polite’ Response to Anthony Thiselton,” in After Pentecost: Language and Biblical Interpretation. Vol. 2. The Scripture and Hermeneutics Series. Edited by Bartholomew, Craig, Greene, Colin, and Möller, Karl. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2001, pp. 121–30.Google Scholar
Olsen, Marvin E.The Process of Social Organization. New York: Holt & Rinehart, 1968.Google Scholar
Olsson, Birger. Structure and Meaning in the Fourth Gospel: A Text-Linguistic Analysis of 2:1–11 and 4:1–42. Translated by Jean Gray. CB 6. Lund: CWK Gleerup, 1974.Google Scholar
Onuki, Takashi. “Zur literatursoziologischen Analyse des Johannesevangeliums: auf dem Wege zur Methodenintegration.” Annual of the Japanese Biblical Institute 8 (1982), pp. 162–216.Google Scholar
Onuki, Takashi. Gemeinde und Welt im Johannesevangelium: Ein Beitrag zur Frage nach der theologischen und pragmatischen Funktion des johanneischen “Dualismus”. Wissenschaftliche Monographien zum Alten und Neuen Testament 56. Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag, 1984.Google Scholar
Orchard, Helen C.Courting Betrayal: Jesus as Victim in the Gospel of John. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 161. Culture, Gender, Theory 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Osborne, Grant R. “Redaction Criticism,” in Interpreting the New Testament: Essays on Methods and Issues. Edited by Black, David Alan and Dockery, David S. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2001, pp. 128–49.Google Scholar
Osborne, Grant R.History and Theology in the Synoptic Gospels.” TJ 24 (2003), pp. 5–22.Google Scholar
Osborne, Robin Jr.Classical Landscape with Figures: The Ancient Greek City and its Countryside. Dobbs Ferry: Sheridan, 1987.Google Scholar
Osiek, Carolyn. “The Family in Early Christianity: ‘Family Values’ Reconsidered.” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 58 (1996), pp. 1–24.Google Scholar
Osiek, Carolyn and Balch, David L. The Family in the New Testament: Households and House Churches. The Family, Religion, and Culture. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1997.Google Scholar
O'Toole, Robert F. “Luke's Position on Politics and Society in Luke-Acts,” in Political Issues in Luke-Acts. Edited by Cassidy, R. J. and Scharper, P. J.. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1983, pp. 1–17.Google Scholar
O'Toole, Robert F.The Parallels between Jesus and Moses.” Biblical Theology Bulletin 20 (1990), pp. 22–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Overbeck, Franz. “Über die Anfänge der patristischen Literature.” Historische Zeitschrift 12 (1882), pp. 417–72.Google Scholar
Overman, J. Andrew. Matthew's Gospel and Formative Judaism: The Social World of the Matthean Community. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1990.Google Scholar
Overman, J. Andrew. Church and Community in Crisis: The Gospel According to Matthew. The New Testament in Context. Valley Forge, Pa.: Trinity Press International, 1996.Google Scholar
Paget, James Carleton. Review of David C. Sim, The Gospel of Matthew and Christian Judaism: The History and Social Setting of the Matthean Community. Reviews in Religion and Theology 7 (2000), pp. 48–51.Google Scholar
Painter, John. John: Witness and Theologian. London: SPCK, 1975.Google Scholar
Painter, John. “The Farewell Discourses and the History of Johannine Christianity.” NTS 27 (1981), pp. 525–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Painter, John. The Quest for the Messiah: The History, Literature and Theology of the Johannine Community. Rev. and enl. edn. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1993.Google Scholar
Painter, John. “The Point of John's Christology: Christology, Conflict and Community in John,” in Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole. Edited by Horrell, David G and Tuckett, Christopher M. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 99. Leiden: Brill, 2000, pp. 231–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Palmer, Humphrey. The Logic of Gospel Criticism: An Account of the Methods and Arguments used by Textual, Documentary, Source, and Form Critics of the New Testament. London: Macmillan, 1968.Google Scholar
Palmer, Richard E. Review of E. D. Hirsch, Jr., Validity in Interpretation. Journal of the American Academy of Religion 36 (1968), pp. 243–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pancaro, Severino. The Law in the Fourth Gospel: The Torah and the Gospel, Moses and Jesus, Judaism and Christianity According to Jesus. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 42. Leiden: Brill, 1975.Google Scholar
Patterson, S. J.The Gospel of Thomas and Jesus. Sonoma, Calif.: Polebridge, 1993.Google Scholar
Paulus, Heinrich E. G.Bretschneider de Origine Ev. Et Epist. Joann.” Heidelberger Jahrbücher der Literatur (1821), pp. 112–42.Google Scholar
Pearson, Birger A.1 Thessalonians 2:13–16: A Deutero-Pauline Interpolation.” Harvard Theological Review 64 (1971), pp. 79–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peterson, Dwight N.The Origins of Mark: The Markan Community in Current Debate. Biblical Interpretation Series 48. Leiden: Brill, 2000.Google Scholar
Peterson, Norman R.Rediscovering Paul: Philemon and the Sociology of Paul's Narrative World. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1985.Google Scholar
Peterson, Norman R.The Gospel of John and the Sociology of Light: Language and Characterization in the Fourth Gospel. Valley Forge, Pa.: Trinity Press International, 1993.Google Scholar
Peterson, Norman R.The Reader in the Gospel.” Neotestamentica 18 (1994), pp. 38–51.Google Scholar
Perrin, Norman. What is Redaction Criticism?London: SPCK, 1970.Google Scholar
Perrin, Norman. “The Literary Gattung ‘Gospel’ — Some Observations.” Expository Times 82 (1970), pp. 4–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perrin, Norman. “Historical Criticism, Literary Criticism, and Hermeneutics.” Journal of Religion 52 (1972), pp. 361–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perrin, Norman. A Modern Pilgrimage in New Testament Christology. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1974.Google Scholar
Perrin, Norman. The New Testament: An Introduction: Proclamation and Parenesis, Myth and History. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1974.Google Scholar
Piper, Otto A.Unchanging Promises: Exodus in the New Testament.” Interpretation 11 (1957), pp. 3–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piwowarcyzk, Mary Ann. “The Narratee and the Situation on Enunciation: A Reconsideration of Prince's Theory.” Genre 9 (1976), pp. 161–77.Google Scholar
Plantinga, Alvin. Warranted Christian Belief. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plett, Heinrich F., ed. Intertextuality. Research in Text Theory 15. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1991.Google Scholar
Plummer, A.The Gospel According to St. John. Cambridge: University Press, 1892.Google Scholar
Plummer, A.A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. Luke. 4th edn. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1901.Google Scholar
Porter, Stanley E.Verbal Aspect in the Greek of the New Testament, with Reference to Tense and Mood. Studies in Biblical Greek 1. New York: Peter Lang, 1993.Google Scholar
Porter, Stanley E. “The Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament: A Brief Comment on Method and Terminology,” in Studies in Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity: Investigations and Proposals. Edited by Evans, Craig A and Sanders, James A. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 148. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997, pp. 79–96.Google Scholar
Porter, Stanley E., ed. Reading the Gospels Today. McMaster New Testament Studies. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2004.Google Scholar
Porter, Stanley E. and Evans, Craig A, eds. The Johannine Readings. BS 32. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Powell, Mark Allan. What is Narrative Criticism? Guides to Biblical Scholarship. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1990.Google Scholar
Powell, Mark Allan. “What is ‘Literary’ about Literary Aspects?,” in Society of Biblical Literature Seminar Papers. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1992, pp. 40–48.Google Scholar
Powell, Mark Allan. Chasing the Eastern Star: Adventures in Biblical Reader-Response Criticism. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001.Google Scholar
Prince, Gerald. Narratology: The Form and Function of Narrative. Berlin: Mouton, 1982.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pritz, R. A.Nazarene Jewish Christianity. SPN 37. Leiden: Brill, 1988.Google Scholar
Purvis, J. D.The Fourth Gospel and the Samaritans.” NovT 17 (1975), pp. 161–98.Google Scholar
Quast, Kevin. Peter and the Beloved Disciple: Figures for a Community in Crisis. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 32. Sheffield: JSOT Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Rabinowitz, Peter. “Truth in Fiction: A Reexamination of Audiences.” CI 4 (1977), pp. 121–41.Google Scholar
Rajak, Tessa. “Jews and Christians as Groups,” in “To See Ourselves as Others See Us”: Christians, Jews, “Others” in Late Antiquity. Edited by Neusner, Jacob and Frerichs, Ernest S. Scholars Press Studies in the Humanities. Chico, Calif.: Scholars Press, 1985, pp. 247–62.Google Scholar
Rawson, Beryl. The Family in Ancient Rome: New Perspectives. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Reicke, Bo. Diakonie, Festfreude, und Zelos in Verbindung mit der altchristlichen Agapenfeier. Uppsala Universitets Arsskrift 1951, 5. Uppsala: Lundequist, 1951.Google Scholar
Reinhartz, Adele. The Word in the World: The Cosmological Tale in the Fourth Gospel. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 45. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Reinhartz, Adele. “The Johannine Community and its Jewish Neighbors: A Reappraisal,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 111–38.Google Scholar
Reinhartz, Adele. “‘Jews’ and Jews in the Fourth Gospel,” in Anti-Judaism and the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Bieringer, Reimund, Pollefeyt, Didier, and Vandecasteele-Vanneuville, Frederique. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001, pp. 213–27.Google Scholar
Reinhartz, Adele. “Women in the Johannine Community: An Exercise in Historical Imagination,” in A Feminist Companion to John. Edited by Amy-Jill Levine, . Feminist Companion to the New Testament and Early Christian Writings 5. London: Sheffield Academic Press, 2003, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 14–33.Google Scholar
Remus, H. E.Sociology of Knowledge and the Study of Early Christianity.” Social Research 11 (1982), pp. 45–56.Google Scholar
Renan, Ernest. Vie de Jésus. 9th edn. Paris: G. Paetz, 1864.Google Scholar
Rensberger, David. Johannine Faith and Liberating Community. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1988.Google Scholar
Rensberger, David. 1 John, 2 John, 3 John. Abingdon New Testament Commentaries. Nashville: Abingdon, 1997.Google Scholar
Rensberger, David. “Sectarianism and Theological Interpretation in John,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 139–56.Google Scholar
Reploh, Karl-Georg. Markus, Lehrer der Gemeinde. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 1969.Google Scholar
Rhoads, David and Michie, Donald. Mark as Story: An Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982.Google Scholar
Rhoads, David and Syreeni, Kari. Characterization in the Gospels: Reconceiving Narrative Criticism. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 176. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Rich, J. and Wallace-Hadrill, A., eds. City and Country in the Ancient World. London: Routledge, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richard, E.Expressions of Double Meaning and their Function in the Gospel of John.” NTS 31 (1985), pp. 96–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Riches, John K. “The Birth of Christianity,” in Early Christianity: Origins and Evolutions to A.D. 600. Edited by Hazlett, Ian. London: SPCK, 1991, pp. 28–39.Google Scholar
Riches, John K. “The Synoptic Evangelists and Their Communities,” in Christian Beginnings: Word and Community from Jesus to Post-Apostolic Times. Edited by Jürgen Becker, . Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1993, pp. 213–41.Google Scholar
Richter, Georg. “Präsentische und futurische Eschatologie im 4. Evangelium,” in Gegenwart und kommendes Reich. Edited by Fiedler, Peter and Zeller, Dieter. Stuttgarter Biblische Beiträge. Stuttgart: Katholisches Bibelwerk, 1975, pp. 117–52.Google Scholar
Ricoeur, Paul. Interpretation Theory: Discourse and the Surplus of Meaning. Fort Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1976.Google Scholar
Ricoeur, Paul. Time and Narrative. 3 vols. Translated by Kathleen Blamey and David Pellauer. London: University of Chicago Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Ricoeur, Paul. “Historiography and the Representation of the Past,” in 2000 Years and Beyond: Faith, Identity, and the “Common Era.” Edited by Gifford, Paul with Archard, David, Hart, Trevor, and Rapport, Nigel. London: Routledge, 2003, pp. 51–68.Google Scholar
Riddle, Donald Wayne. “Early Christian Hospitality: A Factor in the Gospel Transmission.” Journal of Biblical Literature 57 (1938), pp. 141–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Riesenfeld, H.Zu den johanneischen ἵνα–Sätzen.” ST 19 (1965), pp. 213–20.Google Scholar
Robbins, Thomas, Anthony, Dick, and Curtis, Thomas E. “The Limits of Symbolic Realism: Problems of Emphatic Field Observation in a Sectarian Context.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 12 (1973), pp. 259–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robbins, Vernon K.Jesus the Teacher: A Socio-Rhetorical Interpretation of Mark. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1984.Google Scholar
Robbins, Vernon K. “The Social Location of the Implied Author of Luke-Acts,” in The Social World of Luke-Acts: Models for Interpretation. Edited by Neyrey, Jerome H. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1991, pp. 305–32.Google Scholar
Robinson, James M.A New Quest for the Historical Jesus. Studies in Biblical Theology 25. London: SCM Press, 1959.Google Scholar
Robinson, James M.The Problem of History in Mark, Reconsidered.” Union Seminary Quarterly Review 20 (1965), pp. 131–47.Google Scholar
Robinson, James M. “The Johannine Trajectory,” in Trajectories through Early Christianity. Edited by Robinson, James M and Koester, Helmut. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1971, pp. 232–68.Google Scholar
Robinson, James M.The Problem of History in Mark and Other Marcan Studies. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1982.Google Scholar
Robinson, John A. T.Elijah, John and Jesus: An Essay in Detection.” NTS 4 (1958–59), pp. 263–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robinson, John A. T. The Priority of John. Edited by Coakley, J. F.. London: SCM Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Robertis, Francesco M.. Storia delle corporazioni e del regime associativo nel mondo romano. 2 vols. Bari: Adriatica editrice, 1973.Google Scholar
Roberts, J. J. M.Myth Versus History.” Catholic Biblical Quarterly 38 (1976), pp. 1–13.Google Scholar
Robertson, Roland. The Sociological Interpretation of Religion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Rodd, Cyril S.Max Weber and Ancient Judaism.” Scottish Journal of Theology 32 (1979), pp. 457–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rodd, Cyril S.On Applying a Sociological Theory to Biblical Studies.” Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 19 (1981), pp. 95–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rohde, Joachim. Rediscovering the Teaching of the Evangelists. Translated by Dorothea M. Barton. London: SCM Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L.Methodological Considerations in the Debate over the Social Class Status of Early Christians.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 52 (1984), pp. 519–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L. “‘Social Location of Thought’ as a Heuristic Construct in New Testament Study.” JSNT 30 (1987), pp. 103–19.Google Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L. “The Pre-Industrial City in Luke-Acts: Urban Social Relations,” in The Social World of Luke-Acts: Models for Interpretation. Edited by Neyrey, Jerome H. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1991, pp. 125–49.Google Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L.The Social Location of the Markan Audience.” Interpretation 47 (1993), pp. 380–95.Google Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L. “The Gospel of John in the Twenty-first Century,” in “What is John?” Volume Ⅱ. Literary and Social Readings of the Fourth Gospel. Edited by Segovia, Fernando F. Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series 7. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998, pp. 257–63.Google Scholar
Rohrbaugh, Richard L., ed. The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1996.Google Scholar
Rostovtzeff, Mihail. The Social and Economic History of the Roman Empire. 2 vols. 2nd edn. rev. by Fraser, P. M.. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957.Google Scholar
Roth, Wolfgang. Hebrew Gospel: Cracking the Code of Mark. Oak Park, Ill.: Meyer-Stone Books, 1988.Google Scholar
Roth, Wolfgang. “To Invert or Not to Invert: The Pharisaic Canon in the Gospels,” in Studies in Scripture in Early Judaism and Christianity: Investigations and Proposals. Edited by Evans, Craig A and Sanders, James A. Journal for the Study of the New Testament: Supplement Series 148. Studies in Scripture and Early Judaism and Christianity 5. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997, pp. 59–78.Google Scholar
Rowland, Christopher. Christian Origins: An Account of the Setting and Character of the Most Important Sect of Judaism. London: SPCK, 1985.Google Scholar
Rowland, Christopher. “Reading the New Testament Sociologically: An Introduction,” Theology 88 (1985), pp. 358–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Runciman, W. G. “Class, Status and Power,” in Social Stratification. Edited by Jackson, J. A.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968, pp. 25–61.Google Scholar
Russell, D. A.Criticism in Antiquity. London: Gerald Duckworth, 1981.Google Scholar
Russell, David S.The Method and Message of Jewish Apocalyptic, 200 BC–AD 100. London: SCM Press, 1964.Google Scholar
Saldarini, Anthony J.Matthew's Christian-Jewish Community. Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Sanders, E. P.Jewish Law from Jesus to the Mishnah. Five Studies. London: SCM Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Sanders, E. P. and Davies, Margaret. Studying the Synoptic Gospels. London: SCM Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Sanders, James A.Intertextuality and Dialogue.” Biblical Theology Bulletin 29 (1999), pp. 35–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sandmel, Samuel. Philo of Alexandria: An Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Schäfer, Peter. “Die sogenannte Synode von Jabne: Zur Trennung von Juden und Christen im ersten/zweiten Jh. n. Chr,” in Studien zur Geschichte und Theologie des Rabbinischen Judentums. Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums 15. Leiden: Brill, 1978, pp. 45–64.Google Scholar
Schiffmann, Lawrence H.Who Was a Jew? Rabbinic and Halakhic Perspectives on the Jewish-Christian Schism. Hoboken, NJ: Ktav Publishing House, 1985.Google Scholar
Schille, Gottfried. Anfänge der Kirche: Erwägungen zur apostolischen Frühgeschichte. Munich: Kaiser, 1966.Google Scholar
Schillebeeckx, Edward. Revelation and Theology. Translated by N. D. Smith. New York: Sheed & Ward, 1967.Google Scholar
Schmidt, Karl L.Der Rahmen der Geschichte Jesu. Berlin: Trowitzsch & Sohn, 1919.Google Scholar
Schmidt, Karl L. “Die Stellung der Evangelien in der allgemeinen Literaturgeschichte,” in EUCHARISTION: Studien zur Religion und Literatur des Alten und Neuen Testaments: Hermann Gunkel zum 60. Edited by Schmidt, Hans. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1923, vol. Ⅱ, pp. 50–134.Google Scholar
Schmidt, Karl L. “ἐκκλησία,” in Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. Edited by Kittel, Gerhard. Translated and edited by Bromiley, Geoffrey. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1964–76, vol. Ⅲ, pp. 501–36.Google Scholar
Schnackenburg, Rudolf. The Gospel According to St. John. 3 vols. Translated by Cecil Hastings et al. Herders Theological Commentary on the New Testament. London: Burns and Oates, 1968–82.Google Scholar
Schnackenburg, Rudolf. The Johannine Epistles: Introduction and Commentary. Translated by Reginald and Ilse Fuller. Tunbridge Wells: Burns & Oates, 1992.Google Scholar
Schneemelcher, Wilhelm. New Testament Apocrypha. Volume One: Gospels and Related Writings. Rev. edn. Translated by R. McL. Wilson. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1991.Google Scholar
Schnelle, Udo. Antidocetic Christology in the Gospel of John: An Investigation of the Place of the Fourth Gospel in the Johannine School. Translated by L. M. Maloney. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1992.Google Scholar
Schniewind, Julius. “Zur Synoptiker-ExegeseTheologische Rundschau 2 (1930), pp. 129–89.Google Scholar
Schreiber, Johannes. Theologie des Vertrauens: Eine redaktionsgeschichtliche Untersuchung des Markusevangeliums. Hamburg: Furche-Verlag, 1967.Google Scholar
Schuchard, Bruce G.Scripture within Scripture: The Interrelationship of Form and Function in the Explicit Old Testament Citations in the Gospel of John. Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series 133. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Schürer, Emil. The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ. Rev. and enl. edn. Translated by Vermes, Geza,