Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-ns2hh Total loading time: 0.619 Render date: 2022-10-02T04:50:01.777Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

‘Thou Laidst No Sieges to the Music-Room’: Anatomizing Wars, Staging Battles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2019

Emma Smith
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Get access

Summary

In this article, I want to review evidence, from the early modern period, for the staging of siege scenes in particular, and battle sequences in general. This reveals that playhouse combats were often ritualized or emblematized, and very often minimalized. It is plausible that they were less prominent than in many contemporary stage productions and in most screen versions. Filmmakers, in order to satisfy contemporary demands for spectacle, can film on location and exhibit the vasty fields of France, but they also tend to magnify the battles, making them both more life-like and more climactic than they originally were.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey 72 , pp. 48 - 63
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×