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2. - Shakespeare in Performance

from The Year’s Contributions To Shakespeare Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2019

Emma Smith
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

However sophisticated or assertive a director or designer may be, it is the actor and his or her body that carry the ultimate authority in most kinds of theatre, especially in ‘live’ performance. ‘Liveness’ is a category debated in a number of the works reviewed this year, and evidence from the archive is always both invaluable and to be questioned. Nevertheless, the power of the actor to ‘fix’ posthumously an image of a character, assisted in this case by the photographer’s camera, is asserted in Angus McBean’s photograph of Richard Burton as Prince Henry in the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre’s 1951 production of Henry IV, Part Two, which forms the front cover of Shakespeare by McBean, edited by Adrian Woodhouse.

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Shakespeare Survey 72 , pp. 355 - 368
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Sher, Antony, Year of the Mad King: The Lear Diaries (London, 2018)Google Scholar
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