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6 - Economics of Shale Gas in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 January 2017

R. Quentin Grafton
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
Ian G. Cronshaw
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
Michal C. Moore
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Risks, Rewards and Regulation of Unconventional Gas
A Global Perspective
, pp. 111 - 128
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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