Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nr4z6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-25T21:57:56.728Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

5 - From the Age of the Crowd to the Global Age

from Part I - Roots of Revolution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 April 2018

Brady Wagoner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
Fathali M. Moghaddam
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Jaan Valsiner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
Get access

Summary

This chapter outlines a crowd psychology for the 21st century that includes processes of collective memory and globalization. The argument begins by outlining the main characteristics of crowd thinking, especially the importance of ideational images for forging affective group attachments and motivating action in a common direction. It proceeds to elaborate the important place of a group’s traditions in crowd theory with the concept of collective memory, where a reservoir of past images serves to orient action in the present thus moderating social changes. In a globalized world, images are quickly transmitted around the world, where they enter into the social-politic dynamics of different localities, becoming symbols for new causes. Under these conditions an uprising in one part of the world can spark one elsewhere. Some of these images and symbols may even become a part of global collective memory. Finally, the chapter highlights how Moghaddam’s concept of ‘mutual radicalization’ can be read through the lens of globalized crowd psychology.
Type
Chapter
Information
The Psychology of Radical Social Change
From Rage to Revolution
, pp. 86 - 100
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, B. (1983). Imagined Communities. London: Verso.Google Scholar
Bartlett, F. C. (1923). Psychology and Primitive Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Billig, M. (1995). Banal Nationalism. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Carretero, M., and van Alphen, F. (2018). History, collective memory or national memories? How the representation of the past is framed by master narratives. In Wagoner, B. (Ed.), Handbook of Culture and Memory. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Connerton, P. (1989). How Societies Remember. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Feber, D. P. (1996). Suggestion: Metaphor and meaning. Journal of the History of the Behavioural Sciences, 32, 1629.Google Scholar
Halbwachs, M. (1925/1992). On Collective Memory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Hobsbawm, E. (1962). The Age of Revolution: 1789–1848. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.Google Scholar
Le Bon, G. (1885/2002). The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind. New York: Dover.Google Scholar
Mitchell, W. J. T. (2005). What Do Pictures Want? The Lives and Loves of Images. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Moscovici, S. (1981). The Age of the Crowd: A Historical Treatise of Mass Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Moscovici, S. (1986). Discovery of the masses. In Grauman, C. F. and Moscovici, S. (Eds.), Changing Conceptions of Crowd Mind and Behavior (pp. 525). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moscovici, S. (2000). Social Representations: Explorations in Social Psychology. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Moscovici, S. (2008). Psychoanalysis: Its Image and Its Public. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Reich, W. (1946). The Mass Psychology of Fascism. New York: Orgone Institute Press.Google Scholar
Ritchie, D. (2012). Metaphors and stories in discourse about personal and social change. In Wagoner, B., Jensen, E., and Oldmeadow, J. A. (Eds.), Culture and Social Change: Transforming Society through the Power of Ideas (pp. 99118). Charlotte, NC: Information Age.Google Scholar
van Ginneken, J. (1992). Crowds, Psychology and Politics, 1871–1899. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Wagoner, B. (2017). The Constructive Mind: Bartlett's Psychology in Reconstruction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×