Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-7zlxw Total loading time: 0.428 Render date: 2022-01-25T05:55:35.853Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

28 - Management of cancer of the vagina

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2015

Rashmi Jadon
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK
Emma Hudson
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK
Louise Hanna
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK
Louise Hanna
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff
Tom Crosby
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff
Fergus Macbeth
Affiliation:
Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Alonso, I., Felix, A., Torné, A., et al. (2012). Human papillomavirus as a favorable prognostic biomarker in squamous cell carcinomas of the vagina. Gynecol. Oncol., 125, 194–199.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andreyev, H. J., Benton, B., Lalji, A., et al. (2013). Algorithm-based management of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in patients after pelvic radiation treatment (ORBIT): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet, 382, 2084–2092.CrossRef
Beriwal, S., Rwigma, J. C., Higgins, E., et al. (2012). Three-dimensional image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for vaginal cancer. Brachytherapy, 11, 176–180.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blecharz, P., Reinfuss, M., Jakubowicz, J., et al. (2012). Effectiveness of radiotherapy in patients with primary invasive vaginal carcinoma. Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol., 34, 436–441.Google Scholar
Chyle, V., Zagars, G. K., Wheeler, J. A., et al. (1996). Definitive radiotherapy for carcinoma of the vagina: outcome and prognostic factors. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys., 35, 891–905.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Daling, J. R., Madeleine, M. M., Schwartz, S. M., et al. (2002). A population-based study of squamous cell vaginal cancer: HPV and cofactors. Gynecol. Oncol., 84, 263–270.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dalrymple, J. L., Russell, A. H., Lee, S. W., et al. (2004). Chemoradiation for primary invasive squamous carcinoma of the vagina. Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer, 14, 110–117.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
FIGO Committee on Gynecologic Oncology. (2009). Current FIGO staging for cancer of the vagina, fallopian tube, ovary, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Int. J. Gynaecol. Obstet., 105, 3–4.
Frank, S. J., Jhingran, A., Levenback, C., et al. (2005). Definitive radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys., 62, 138–147.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ghia, A. J., Gonzalez, V. J., Tward, J. D., et al. (2011). Primary vaginal cancer and chemoradiotherapy: a patterns-of-care analysis. Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer, 21, 378–384.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hiniker, S. M., Rouz, A., Murphy, J. D., et al. (2013). Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina: prognostic factors, treatment patterns, and outcomes. Gynecol. Oncol. 131, 380–385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Larsson, G. L., Helenius, G., Andersson, S., et al. (2013). Prognostic impact of human papilloma virus (HPV) genotyping and HPV-16 subtyping in vaginal carcinoma. Gynecol. Oncol., 129, 406–411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lilic, V., Lilic, G., Filipovic, S., et al. (2010). Primary carcinoma of the vagina. J. B.U.O.N. 15, 241–247.Google ScholarPubMed
Mock, U., Kucera, H., Fellner, C., et al. (2003). High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of primary vaginal carcinoma: long-term results and side effects. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys., 56, 950–957.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nanavati, P. J., Fanning, J., Hilgers, R. D., et al. (1993). High-dose-rate brachytherapy in primary stage I and II vaginal cancer. Gynecol. Oncol., 51, 67–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
NICE. (2015). Suspected cancer: recognition and referral. NICE guidance. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
Parikh, J. H., Barton, D. P., Ind, T. E., et al. (2008). MR imaging features of vaginal malignanciesRadiographics, 28, 49–63.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Samant, R., Lau, B., E C, et al. (2007). Primary vaginal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation using cis-platinum. Int. J. Rad. Oncol.Biol.Phys., 69, 746–750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shah, C. A., Goff, B. A.Lowe, K., et al. (2009). Factors affecting risk of mortality in women with vaginal cancer. Obstet. Gynecol., 113, 1038.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tjalma, W. A. A., Monaghan, J. M., de Barros Lopes, A., et al. (2001). The role of surgery in invasive squamous carcinoma of the vagina. Gynecol. Oncol., 81, 360–365.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
WHO classification. (2003). In World Health Organization Classification of Tumours: Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Breast and Female Genital Organs, ed. Tavassoli, A. and Devilee, P.. Lyon: IARC Press, Chapter 6.

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×