Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-6xp8w Total loading time: 0.3 Render date: 2022-01-23T14:25:59.471Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

12 - Clientelism in Japan: the importance and limits of institutional explanations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2009

Ethan Scheiner
Affiliation:
Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of California, Davis
Herbert Kitschelt
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Steven I. Wilkinson
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Get access

Summary

Japan is (in)famous for its clientelistic politics, for which the country's electoral institutions are frequently blamed. Indeed, this chapter's analysis of clientelism in Japan is more sympathetic than the other chapters in this volume to institutional explanations for voter–politician linkages. In Japan, electoral rules have helped protect the clientelistic system, as societal pressures to reduce the country's particularistic arrangements run through institutions that privilege those favoring clientelism's maintenance. The most popular institutional arguments surrounding Japanese clientelism tend to focus on the now-defunct but long-used single non-transferable vote in multimember district (SNTV/MMD) electoral systems. SNTV/MMD was useful in helping to organize clientelistic linkages. Nevertheless, just as Müller in this volume argues that no electoral system is likely to determine the nature of voter-politician linkages, I argue that SNTV/MMD was neither necessary nor sufficient for clientelism in Japan.

SNTV/MMD was important in reinforcing clientelistic linkages, but clientelism in Japan was originally due to other factors, especially the internal mobilization of the country's first parties and the organization of landholding. In the postwar period, SNTV/MMD created incentives for new political arrangements that held clientelism at their core, but SNTV/MMD was hardly a sufficient reason for clientelism. The electoral system was utilized throughout the country, but the levels of clientelism varied with differences in social structure, local governmental financial autonomy, and political economy.

This chapter offers support for the principal arguments laid out in the Introduction, and the Müller, and Kitschelt contributions to this volume.

Type
Chapter
Information
Patrons, Clients and Policies
Patterns of Democratic Accountability and Political Competition
, pp. 276 - 297
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
9
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×