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Chapter 6 - Spinal Ultrasound for Neuraxial Anesthesia Placement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2019

Tauqeer Husain
Affiliation:
Ashford and St Peter’s NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey
Roshan Fernando
Affiliation:
Womens Wellness and Research Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
Scott Segal
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University, North Carolina
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Obstetric Anesthesiology
An Illustrated Case-Based Approach
, pp. 24 - 29
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Broadbent, CR, Maxwell, WB, Ferrie, R, et al. Ability of anaesthetists to identify a marked lumbar interspace. Anaesthesia 2000; 55:1122–26.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Ultrasound guided catheterisation of the epidural space: understanding NICE guidance, January 2008. Available at www.nice.org.uk (accessed November 11, 2014).
Grau, T, Leipold, RW, Conradi, R, et al. Efficacy of ultrasound imaging in obstetric epidural anesthesia. J Clin Anesth 2002; 14:169–75.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shaikh, F, Brzezinski, J, Alexander, S, et al. Ultrasound imaging for lumbar punctures and epidural catheterisations: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2013; 346:f1720.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grau, T, Bartusseck, E, Conradi, R, et al. Ultrasound imaging improves learning curves in obstetric epidural anesthesia: a preliminary study. Can J Anesth 2003; 50:1047–50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Furness, G, Reilly, MP, Kuchi, S. An evaluation of ultrasound imaging for identification of lumbar intervertebral level. Anaesthesia 2002; 57:277–80.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chin, KJ, Perlas, A, Chan, V, et al. Ultrasound imaging facilitates spinal anesthesia in adults with difficult surface anatomic landmarks. Anesthesiology 2011; 115:94101.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carvalho, JCA. Ultrasound-facilitated epidurals and spinals in obstetrics. Anesthesiol Clin 2008; 26:145–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sahota, JS, Carvalho, JCA, Balki, M, et al. Ultrasound estimates for midline epidural punctures in the obese parturient: paramedian sagittal oblique is comparable to transverse median plane. Anesth Analg 2013; 116:829–35.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Margarido, CB, Arzola, C, Balki, M, et al. Anesthesiologists’ learning curves for ultrasound assessment of the lumbar spine. Can J Anesth 2010; 57:120–26.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arzola, C, Mikhael, R, Margarido, C, et al. Spinal ultrasound versus palpation for epidural catheter insertion in labor: a randomised controlled trial. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2014; 31:17.Google Scholar
Chin, KJ, Ramlogan, R, Arzola, C, et al. The utility of ultrasound imaging in predicting ease of performance of spinal anesthesia in an orthopedic patient population. Reg Anesth Pain Med 2013; 38:3438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weed, JT, Taenzer, AH, Finkel, KJ, et al. Evaluation of pre-procedure ultrasound examination as a screening tool for difficult spinal anaesthesia. Anaesthesia 2011; 66:925–30.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Karmakar, MK, Li, X, Ho, AMH, et al. Real-time ultrasound guided paramedian epidural access: evaluation of a novel in-plane technique. Br J Anaesth 2009; 102:845–54.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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