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Chapter 15 - Obesity in Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2019

Tauqeer Husain
Affiliation:
Ashford and St Peter’s NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey
Roshan Fernando
Affiliation:
Womens Wellness and Research Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
Scott Segal
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University, North Carolina
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Summary

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Chapter
Information
Obstetric Anesthesiology
An Illustrated Case-Based Approach
, pp. 75 - 80
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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