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Chapter 24 - Emergency Delivery for Fetal Distress

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2019

Tauqeer Husain
Affiliation:
Ashford and St Peter’s NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey
Roshan Fernando
Affiliation:
Womens Wellness and Research Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
Scott Segal
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University, North Carolina
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Summary

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Chapter
Information
Obstetric Anesthesiology
An Illustrated Case-Based Approach
, pp. 128 - 132
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Alexander, JM, Sharma, SK, McIntire, DD, et al. Intensity of labor pain and cesarean delivery. Anesth Analg 2001; 92:1524–28.Google ScholarPubMed
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Classification of urgency of caesarean delivery: a continuum of risk. GP11, 2010. Available at www.rcog.org.uk/classification-of-urgency-of-caesarean-section-good-practice-11 (accessed August 10, 2016).
Thurlow, JA, Kinsella, SM. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress. Int J Obstet Anesth 2002; 11:105–16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Intrapartum care: care of healthy women and their babies during childbirth, CG190, 2014. Available at www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg190 (accessed August 10, 2016).
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Lam, DTC, Ngan Kee, WD, Khaw, KS. Extension of epidural blockade in labour for emergency caesarean section using 2% lidocaine with epinephrine and fentanyl, with or without alkalinisation. Anaesthesia 2001; 56:790–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kinsella, SM, Girgirah, K, Scrutton, MJL. Rapid sequence spinal for Category I urgency caesarean section: a case series. Anaesthesia 2010; 65:664–69.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kathirgamanathan, A, Douglas, MJ, Tyler, J, et al. Speed of spinal vs general anaesthesia for Category I caesarean section: a simulation and clinical observation‐based study. Anaesthesia 2013; 68:753–59.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stocks, GM. Opposer: When using spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section after the epidural has failed, the normal dose of spinal anaesthetic should be used. Int J Obstet Anesth 2005; 14:5557.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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