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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2023

Wolfgang Schnotz
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University of Koblenz-Landau
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  • References
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.012
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  • References
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.012
Available formats
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  • References
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.012
Available formats
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